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They are some of the most intimate images ever taken of John and Yoko. In one portrait, the couple are pictured at their secret wedding in Gibraltar in 1969. In another, they happily nestle together in the back of a limo following the ceremony.

Others show the newlyweds, both in white, looking relaxed on a private jet at the end of the wedding saga that would later be immortalised in hit song The Ballad Of John And Yoko.

Yet they are among the most controversial pictures, too. For as John Lennon’s widow prepares to mark the anniversary of her wedding to the late Beatle next Sunday, The Mail on Sunday can reveal these exclusive images are a source of anguish that has distressed her for decades. 

As the photographer who took the pictures that day explains, they are at the heart of a long-running mystery after vanishing in an apparent burglary. And, despite the best efforts of detectives, have never been seen since. Until now – because a Mail on Sunday investigation has tracked down the negatives for the 118 missing pictures, estimated to be worth more than £100,000, and discovered they are being touted for sale, apparently by well-known Beatles biographer, although he denies it.  details

Rock and pop legend Sir Paul McCartney was spotted at Cineworld in Ashford yesterday to catch the third instalment in the Kung Fu Panda series. He visited the multiplex with a teenage boy, believed to be his grandson. Zoe Robertson, from Folkestone, who is a massive fan of The Beatles, was in the same screening as the singer/songwriter.

Her dreams came true when he approached her after the film was over. Miss Robertson said: "We saw him in the popcorn queue before the film and my partner said 'That's Sir Paul'. But I didn't believe him. "But then when we were handing our tickets over to go through, the member of staff said 'Hello Sir Paul' to him, so we knew it was him." Sir Paul, 73, and his young companion sat in the row behind Miss Robertson, who was with her partner and his daughter.

She adds: "When I went to the loo, another woman came up to me and asked if it was him sitting behind me. "Then when we were walking out, I saw him over my shoulder. He said hello to me and I said it back. He then crossed the foyer to come and talk to us. "He was really relaxed and friendly and asked us if we liked the film and what we were doing for the rest of the day." Miss Robertson did ask for a photo, but the Hey Jude, Let details

Guitar company Fender has painstakingly replicated the Telecaster George Harrison played both in the sessions for Let It Be and in the Beatles' farewell concert atop the roof of Apple Records headquarters. It has made 100 limited-edition copies of the guitar, reproduced down to minute details, which are available now.

The original guitar can be seen prominently during the Beatles' performance of "Get Back" during the rooftop concert. Fender had custom-made two copies of the model and sent one to Harrison and Jimi Hendrix, with hopes they'd play them live. Hendrix died before he was able to play his, according to the Beatle's son, Dhani Harrison.

The suggested retail price for one of the replica guitars is a hefty $12,500, but it is meant to reflect the level of attention to detail put into the instrument. Harrison's family granted Fender Custom Shop Master Builder Paul Waller access to the Beatle's instrument, a 1968 Rosewood Telecaster, and allowed him to examine, dismantle and effectively reverse-engineer it. 

Returning the guitar to its native state proved to be more difficult than Waller had expected. Harrison had given the instrument to his friend, Delaney and Bonnie songwriter and producer Del details

After a couple of years on his “Out There Tour”, Paul McCartney has decided to retool and relaunch on the road with his new “One on One” product.

The ‘One On One’ Tour will debut a brand new production, as always utilizing state of the art audio and video technology and to ensure an unforgettable experience from every seat in the house. Employing massive screens, lasers, fireworks and, of course, a staggering selection of the best songs ever written or performed, every Paul McCartney show promises a once in a lifetime evening that transcends and elevates the potential of live music.

McCartney hasn’t been off the road for that long, ending the Out There tour in Buffalo, NY on October 22 of last year. The new tour starts on April 13 in Fresno, CA and plays seven North American dates, including two in Vancouver, before moving to Europe starting May 28 in Dusseldorf, Germany.

The dates: 04/13 – Fresno, CA – SaveMart Arena 04/15 – Portland, OR – Moda Center 04/17 – Seattle, WA – Key Arena 04/19 – Vancouver, BC – Rogers Arena 04/20 – Vancouver, BC – Rogers Arena 04/30 – Little Rock, AK – Verizon Ar details

It's something you have to imagine. And while visiting the beach area, he drives his car into a library parking lot just as the radio starts playing a Beatles song, Please Mr. Postman.All of this happened as I went to interview Julia Baird, the sister of former Beatles leader John Lennon, whose music, as she told me, will never disappear.

She's so right. She has examples from all over the world. She was once doing research in India at the Dali Lama's. She was looking for his assistant and found the Buddhist monk listening to a Beatles tune, Yellow Submarine. She has been living with the Beatles and its mania most of her life.

In Panama City for a Beatles tribute concert and signing her book, Imagine This: Growing Up With My Brother John Lennon, Julia, named after her and John's mother Julia, travels with the tribute band the Mersey Beatles, whose members grew up in Liverpool and still live where Julia and John called home.

"The band, I think, is the best of the tribute bands. They grew up in Liverpool, live in Liverpool and do the best tribute of the Beatles." Julia, a half-sister to John, born to the same mother, has written a book to set the record straight about her brother's upbringing, lacing it wit details

George Harrison's widow Olivia rejected calls for a statue of her husband in Henley-on-Thames, where he lived for much of his life, fearing her home would be overrun by Beatles fans. But, undeterred by her wishes, local councillors are now determined to press ahead with some form of lasting monument.

The mayor of Henley, Councillor Lorraine Hillier, is beating the drum for the former Beatles guitarist once more, and has suggested a memorial garden on a green triangle of land, which a developer has offered to the town council free of charge if it agrees to maintain it.

Harrison moved to Henley- on-Thames, in Oxfordshire, in 1970, when he bought Friar Park, a 120-room Victorian neo- Gothic mansion, set in almost 30 acres. He died of cancer aged 58 in 2001. The town's deputy mayor, Julian Brookes, says: 'We don't have any memorials in the town for George Harrison, who lived here for 30 years. Perhaps he should be recognised.' The council is now proposing to approach Olivia to see whether she would welcome the garden initiative. 

Various proposals for a memorial have been considered over the years, including a petition for a statue, which gained 2,000 signatures of support. However, that idea was droppe details

Ringo Starr broke the news of Sir George's death on Twitter as he wished "peace and love" to his family. He posted a picture of The Beatles and Sir George with the caption: "Thank you for all your love and kindness George peace and love."

Sir George's son Giles, who is also a producer and has worked at Abbey Road studios, tweeted: "RIP dad. I love you. I'm so proud to have been your son. I'll miss you more than words can say. Thank you for the all times we had together." Meanwhile, Sir George's manager Adam Sharp said: "The family would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers and messages of support. "In a career that spanned seven decades, he was an inspiration to many and is recognised globally as one of music's most creative talents. He was a true gentleman to the end."

Sir George, a carpenter's son from Holloway in north London, studied at Guildhall School of Music and played the oboe professionally before joining the recording industry. During his early career, Sir George produced comedy and novelty records in the early 1950s, working with Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan. He was head of the Parlophone record label when he first heard The Beatles's demo tape in 1962, with the band releasing their details

Paul McCartney on George Martin - Wednesday, March 09, 2016

I’m so sad to hear the news of the passing of dear George Martin. I have so many wonderful memories of this great man that will be with me forever. He was a true gentleman and like a second father to me. He guided the career of The Beatles with such skill and good humour that he became a true friend to me and my family. If anyone earned the title of the fifth Beatle it was George. From the day that he gave The Beatles our first recording contract, to the last time I saw him, he was the most generous, intelligent and musical person I’ve ever had the pleasure to know.

It’s hard to choose favourite memories of my time with George, there are so many but one that comes to mind was the time I brought the song 'Yesterday’ to a recording session and the guys in the band suggested that I sang it solo and accompany myself on guitar. After I had done this George Martin said to me, "Paul I have an idea of putting a string quartet on the record". I said, “Oh no George, we are a rock and roll band and I don’t think it’s a good idea”. With the gentle bedside manner of a great producer he said to me, "Let us try it and if it doesn’t work we won’t use it and we’ll go with details

George Martin, the urbane English record producer who signed the Beatles to a recording contract on the small Parlophone label after every other British record company had turned them down, and who guided them in their transformation from a regional dance band into the most inventive, influential and studio-savvy rock group of the 1960s, died on Tuesday. He was 90.

“We can confirm that Sir George Martin passed away peacefully at home yesterday evening,” Adam Sharp, a founder of CA Management, a British company that represented Mr. Martin, said on Wednesday in an email. Mr. Sharp did not say how Mr. Martin had died.

“God bless George Martin,” Ringo Starr, the former Beatle, wrote on Twitter.

Mr. Martin helped redefine a record producer’s role in pop music. He was one of a handful of pop producers — Phil Spector and Quincy Jones among them — to become almost as famous as the musicians they recorded. And when he left Parlophone, a subsidiary of EMI Records, to start his own production company in 1965, his reputation as the producer of the Beatles helped raise the stature of record production as an independent career, rather than a record label function.

By: details

A Starry Front Row at Stella McCartney - Tuesday, March 08, 2016

It may have been snowing on Monday morning here, but at Stella McCartney’s show in the Palais Garnier, the stars were shining brightly.

Amber Valletta and Doutzen Kroes were there; ditto the Formula One world champion Lewis Hamilton; François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of Kering, which owns the McCartney brand; and the art dealer Dasha Zhukova. In pride of place was the designer’s beaming father, Paul McCartney, alongside his wife, Nancy Shevell.

“Wasn’t it a stormer? Wasn’t it just great?” Mr. McCartney asked after the finale as he made his way down the sweeping grand staircase. “Of course I love every show because Stella is my baby. But I feel like this collection was particularly witty and sexy.’’

“And the closing song was pretty great, too, don’t you think?” he added with a wink.

The track in question was his own 1974 hit with the band Wings, “Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five,” which had many in the crowd whooping with delight — Jess Glynne, the flame-haired British pop singer, among them. She had arrived in Paris that morning after completing the United States and British legs of her tour details

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