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Music students from Weston-super-Mare were given the opportunity to perform at one of the world’s most famous recording studios – London’s Abbey Road.

The students, who all study at Weston College, even got the chance to use the ‘John Lennon microphone’ during the project.

The pupils, who are in the second year of their music degrees at the college, were told to write a composition for brass instruments. It had initially seemed a daunting prospect, as some students had no experience of writing music.

Student Grace Luren at first thought she could not do it. But the project gave the students the opportunity to work alongside National Youth Jazz Orchestra (NYCO). Grace said: “I couldn’t turn down the opportunity to work with musicians of that calibre. “I’m a singer, and cannot read music, so I thought I would embody a brass instrument. “So I sang it all and pretended to be a trumpet.”

With the help of computer programmes, Grace was able to use her voice to compose music the brass players could play to. Paul Raymond, who teaches the course, said: “Grace showed parts of it to the people who would play them, and the first thing th details

He is rarely seen in public with both daughters simultaneously. But Sir Paul McCartney changed all that when he stepped out with daughters Mary and Stella on Friday evening in central London. The Liverpudlian star, 73, looked delighted to join his glamorous offspring at the BAFTA screening of new film This Beautiful Fantastic. 

Cutting a dapper figure, the Beatles star had clearly dressed to impress for the occasion. Stepping out in a navy blue, pin-striped suit, he matched the ensemble with a classic white shirt and a pair of leather-effect shoes. Sporting brown hair, he looked considerably younger than his years.

Not to be out-done, Mary was also out in force - wearing a conservative, yet trendy, look. This consisted of a pair of fitted, black trousers with a square-neck blouse and a silk jacket, complete with baseball collars and equinn detailing. Scooping her hair up into a classy bun, she struck a dramatic resemblance to her famous father. 

Source: Daily Mail

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All You Need Is Love proves all you need for a terrific night out is a rocking good live band, the sublime talents of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra, the comfort and acoustics of the Adelaide Festival Centre and the song writing genius of the greatest band there ever was.

Throw in the considerable singing prowess of four guys clearly enjoying a musical “bromance” and it’s hard to go wrong.

Featuring a catalogue of 30 Beatles songs primarily from their psychedelic period – that have captivated more than one generation – it is all aboard the ‘Mystery Tour’ through to a rousing hand waving encore of Hey Jude.

Ciaran Gribbin, an Irishman brought to Australia to front INXS five years ago, was the standout vocalist in the first half engaging the pack audience with some Irish charm and singing the pants off I Am The Walrus.

Darren Percival and Jackson Thomas, both runners-up in series of The Voice Australia, showed they will be remembered for more that reality TV appearances.

Percival was at his best with Fool On The Hill and Something while Jackson has a sublime voice and handled the tricky Let It Be with star quality.

By: Craig Cook

So details

Maurice White, 1941–2016 - Friday, February 05, 2016

FOUNDER OF 2016 RECORDING ACADEMY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENTS EARTH, WIND & FIRE DIES AT 74

Maurice White, founder of 2016 Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipients Earth, Wind & Fire, died Feb. 3 following a lengthy battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 74.

White founded Earth, Wind & Fire in Chicago in 1969 and shared lead vocal duties with Philip Bailey. He served as the supergroup's principal songwriter and producer for classic albums such as 1971's Earth, Wind & Fire, 1975's That's The Way Of The World and 1976's Spirit. White also co-wrote many Earth, Wind & Fire classics, including "September," "Shining Star" and "Let's Groove."

White earned seven GRAMMY wins, including the group's first career win for Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus for "Shining Star" for 1975. He won a GRAMMY for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s) for 1978 for Earth, Wind & Fire's cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life." Earth, Wind & Fire were recently announced as 2016 recipients of The Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. A special ceremony and concert celebrating this year's Special Merit Award recipients will be held in t details

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the release of “Revolver,” the greatest album by The Beatles, the greatest band of the modern era. Its best song, “For No One,” the best composition by this era’s best songwriter, Paul McCartney, is a 122-second triumph. It starts suddenly. No instrumental introduction to get the ear ready for the melody or the mind ready for the lyrics. We awake in a flash: “Your day breaks / Your mind aches.

It’s a not uncommon trick, this jarring start; perfect for when the writer wants to set a tone from the jump. Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong uses it to establish the punk twitchiness of the melodic marvel “Basket Case.” Squeeze uses it to foreshadow the climactic theme of “Pulling Muscles (From the Shell).” Like McCartney, Kesha (!) uses it in “TiK ToK” to start the day (“Wake up in the morning / Feelin’ like P-Diddy”)&dmash;though, admittedly, to tell about a very different kind of day.

What sets “For No One” apart, though, is the sudden sorrow. The Beatles used a similar approach in Lennon’s superb “Help!” The instant exclamation “Help details

Another Beatles book? You’d be forgiven for thinking there couldn’t possibly be anything left to be written about the Fab Four. Every aspect of their career has been excavated and explored in print so many times. With the exception of Bob Dylan, surely no popular musicians have been subject to such extensive investigation.

However, this latest addition to the canon offers perspective on the band that is as interesting as it is infuriating. Interesting because it considers some of the major legal spats involving the band in their lifetime; infuriating because time after time in Stan Soocher’s obsessively detailed book, one is left with the feeling that as songwriters the Beatles may have had rare talent, but as businessmen they were naive to the point of stupidity.

The book’s strength lies in the ability of its author, an academic and entertainment business attorney, to apply his knowledge of the law to existing files and recently released documentation. Winnowing out irrelevances, he draws some of the remaining threads together into a clearly constructed narrative, which can be read as three simple sub-narratives: the business chaos during the Brian Epstein era; the rise in legal wranglin details

A photograph of the late Beatle George Harrison celebrating his 21st birthday in Los Angeles is expected to attract worldwide attention.

The 1964 colour image shows George, dressed in a blue shirt and grey trousers, opening a huge ‘key to the door’ to celebrate the milestone.

The back of the picture is captioned: ‘George Harrison of the Beatles. 21st birthday party in Los Angeles 1964’. A mystery man can be seen strumming a guitar behind the Liverpool musician.

The lot will go on sale with Suffolk auctioneers Martlesham on February 18 with a catalogue guide price of between £30-£50.

Auctioneer Chris Elmy said: “This picture has travelled a long way from Los Angeles and will, no doubt, continue its journey as there are collectors of Beatles memorabilia all over the world.”

By: Laura Tacey

Source: Liverpool Echo

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Why Ringo rules - Thursday, February 04, 2016

With the welcome news that Ringo Starr & His All Star Band are set to play Cross Insurance Center in Bangor on June 8, it’s a good time to assess some of Starr’s greatness. The Beatles would not have been the group we know today without him.

For starters, he completed the group. They truly became The Beatles when Ringo officially joined the band in August 1962, four years after John, Paul and George began playing together. When Ringo accepted the job, the chemical reaction synthesized by the coming together of those precise personalities created a form of divine magic that can never be duplicated.

Ringo: “Every time he (Pete Best, previous Beatles drummer) was sick, they would ask me to sit in.”

George Harrison: “I was the one responsible for getting Ringo in the group. Every time Ringo played with us, the band just really swung then. I did conspire to get Ringo in and talk to John and Paul until they came around to the idea.”

Paul McCartney: “We really started thinking that we needed THE great drummer in Liverpool. And the great drummer in our eyes was this guy called Ringo Starr.”

By: Mike Dow

Source: The Main Edge

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Whisper it quietly but music royalty Sir Paul McCartney may put in an appearance at this year's Concert At The Kings in All Cannings, near Devizes. There have been rumours that McCartney would take to the stage at Rock Against Cancer since it was first held five years ago. But this time co-organiser John 'Grubby' Callis believes it could happen. And as Grubby is McCartney's sound engineer he should know. He said on Friday: "He has the date and he has promised me that he will appear one year. This is our fifth anniversary so why not this year. But I doubt we will know until very near the time."

Last year McCartney did not make it to All Cannings to join the likes of Lindisfarne and Squeeze but Mr Callis revealed he had made a substantial donation to the event which raises money for a number of cancer charities and local good causes.

The first four concerts have raised a total of more than £112,000 and there are high hopes that this year's on May 21 will be even more successful. It has grown hugely since Mr Callis along with Kings Arms landlord Richard Baulu and Andy Scott guitarist with The Sweet came up with the idea.

By: Joanne Moore

Source: Gazette and Herald

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How do you like your Beatles? Mark Bryant’s second annual Beatlefest at the Spire this last Friday and Saturday served them up in four distinct flavors and no one went away hungry.

First up Friday night were the inimitable local favorites, 3rd Left, who offered a variety of Lennon-McCartney tunes – and one Wing’s hit, raw.

That is not to say their music was undercooked but, rather, as fresh as possible and a packed house that was decidedly older than their usual fans went wild for every serving.

“That reaction was well deserved,” Bryant told the Old Colony this week, as he began to assess the weekend’s mania. “They always step it up, but when things are on the line that’s the band you want.”

Bryan recalled how last year after 3rd Left’s show an “older gentlemen” approached him and said that the band’s passionate performance had literally brought tears to his eyes.

This past Friday a packed house was a bit emotional as well, on their feet for almost every song the local band played, from their opening saxophone-guitar “Blackbird” duet, through spectacular renditions of “While My Guitar Gently We details

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