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The BBC has pulled the plug on a TV special celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the first worldwide simulcast, during which the Beatles premiered the son All You Need Is Love”. And the cancellation threatens a San Francisco component of the project, produced by the Antenna Television.

On June 25, the BBC was planning to air several three-minute segments from dozens of cities around the world, including London, Venice, Italy, and San Francisco. For the videos, local arts producers would create visual spectacles on the theme of love.

Chris Hardman, founder and artistic director of San Francisco’s Antenna Theater, was planning San Francisco’s contribution: a live video stream in which two planes would sky-write a heart over the Golden Gate Bridge while local choruses sang the iconic Beatles’ song from a fleet of boats on the San Francisco Bay. 

“The timing,” Hardman said Monday, “was perfect, with the anniversary of the Summer of Love.”

“The last time I talked to them, the word was full steam ahead, green light,” Hardman said. “And then three days ago we got an email from the details

“At the actual breakup of the Beatles, it was painful,” Paul McCartney said during a 1990 television interview. "We likened it to a divorce.”

Twenty years earlier on April 10, McCartney signaled the end of the Fab Four during his unveiling of his solo album “McCartney.”

On April 9, McCartney released a Q&A package to the British press in which he explained his reasons for making his solo album. Compiled with the help of Apple executives, the self-interview also contained questions McCartney imagined he would be asked regarding the possibility of the Beatles splitting up.

While stopping short of saying that the band was finished, McCartney stated that he did not know whether his "break with the Beatles" would be temporary or permanent.

It didn’t quite feel real, in part, because of the way McCartney phrased it — and also, the Beatles' final album “Let It Be” was yet to be released.

From the group’s first studio contract in 1962, it was clear that John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were something special.

The Ed Sullivan Show

In February 1964, the group made their first details

There's something magical about hearing Sgt. Pepper outtakes in Studio Two of Abbey Road — the same room where the Beatles made the album. The studio looks the same as it did in 1967 — even the same baffles hang on the wall. "Abbey Road is a bit like a salad bowl or a teapot," producer Giles Martin, son and heir to George Martin, tells Rolling Stone. "The walls absorb music."

There's no better place for Rolling Stone to experience an exclusive tour of the Pepper vaults, as Martin spends a hard day's afternoon giving us a one-on-one preview: the previously unheard and unreleased treasures on the new 50th Anniversary Edition of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The box has alternate takes of each song — in some cases drastically different and all offering revelatory insights into the most legendary of rock masterpieces. It's the first time the Beatles have opened their vaults and released new recordings since Anthology.

The new remix has long been craved by hardcore Beatle heads, who have always complained about the diffuse stereo mix. The mono version was the one George Martin, engineer Geoff Emerick a details

Julian Lennon is teaching children how to “Imagine” a better world — and build it themselves.

Like his rock-icon father John Lennon, the 54-year-old musician, photographer, film producer and activist is using his art as a rallying cry.

With a little help from his friends, New York Times bestselling author Bart Davis and Croatian illustrator Smiljana Coh, he’s written Touch the Earth, the first in a planned trilogy of illustrated books designed to educate children on the fragile beauty of the planet — and what they can do to protect it.

Out Tuesday (just ahead of Earth Day on April 22), a portion of the proceeds will go to support the efforts of Lennon’s White Feather Foundation, which fights for environmental and humanitarian causes across the globe.

Lennon spoke to PEOPLE about Touch the Earth, its message and its touching connection to his late father.

PEOPLE: What moved you to write the book series?

Julian: After having written songs about environmental and humanitarian issues, wo details

The storied “Beatles Ashram” awaits beyond a long and winding road across the Ganges River in Rishikesh, the Himalayan town where The Beatles lived in 1968 and composed their curious chapter of renunciation.

Nearly five decades later, the ashram is derelict yet still alive, a peaceful yet eerie abandoned ghost village that the Rajaji Tiger Reserve is now slowly consuming – like endless desires eating away humans and demigods of fame and fortune as The Beatles were circa 1967.

The iconic British band met Transcendental Meditation founder “Maharishi” Mahesh Yogi in London in 1967, and their India odyssey followed. And worldwide media attention followed them.

“I followed The Beatles to Rishikesh with my photographer colleague Raghu Rai,” Saeed Naqui reported in Indian newspaper The Statesman. “Almost every newspaper in the world had sent their senior reporters. Not to much avail, though. The ashram was out of bounds for the media.

” … We walked on ’til I spotted the Maharishi under a tree with The Beatles. I promptly sneaked Raghu Rai in and he took a shot with the aid of his zoom lens. The Statesman had its scoop.”

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ABOUT THIS INTERVIEW:

This printed interview appeared on April 9th 1970 as a press release in advance promotional copies of Paul McCartney's first solo album entitled 'McCartney.'

There have long been misconceptions that Paul had written the questions himself. Paul told the Canadian magazine 'Musical Express' in 1982, "That's one thing that really got misunderstood. I had talked to Peter Brown from Apple and asked him what we were going to do about press on the album. I said, 'I really don't feel like doing it, to tell you the truth,' but he told me that we needed to have something. He said, 'I'll give you some questions and you just write out your answers. We'll put it out as a press release.' Well of course, the way it came out looked like it was specially engineered by me." This was also confirmed in Peter Brown's book 'The Love You Make.'

In the press release interview, Paul answers questions about the future of the Beatles, concerns about the Beatles' new management, as well as questions about the writing and recording of his first solo album.

Paul is asked if the release of the 'McCartney' LP is a rest away from the Beatles or the start of a solo career, to which details

Could this be the earliest recorded film footage of – a then 12-year-old – Paul McCartney?

Last month we asked whether the earliest piece of film showing future Beatles Paul, John Lennon and George Harrison, along with Paul’s brother, Mike McCartney, had been unearthed.

In that case, tiny figures in the distance were on screen for just a couple of seconds, but local historian and Fab Four fan Peter Hodgson, from Kirkby, was convinced the Liverpool City Police recruitment film from 1958 contained a world first.

Now Peter has scoured another You Tube film – Liverpool Trams: Green Goddesses Remembered, by Online Videos – and he said: “This is my finest find yet... absolute gold!

“It is circa 1955 and at one point a tram is seen heading down East Prescot Road, from Old Swan towards Page Moss, where Paul’s Aunty Jin and Uncle Harry lived.

“He is only on screen for a second but, comparing him with old pictures, I am 100% convinced that is Paul sitting at the window, at 29 miunutes and 25 seconds into the film. And is that his late mother, Mary, sitting behind him? It looks like her.”

Paul was born June 18, 1942, and so would ha details

The most ambitious reissue yet of an individual album from the Beatles’ catalog is coming May 26 with an expanded and newly remixed edition of the Fab Four’s 1967 pop masterpiece, “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

Consistently ranked by critics and fans among the most influential rock albums of all time, “Sgt. Pepper” is being reissued in multiple formats and editions, including new stereo and surround-sound audio mixes along with nearly three dozen previously unreleased recordings from the same sessions.

“It’s crazy to think that 50 years later we are looking back on this project with such fondness and a little bit of amazement at how four guys, a great producer and his engineers could make such a lasting piece of art,” Paul McCartney writes in a new introduction for the anniversary edition of a project that started out as his baby.

In a 1970 interview with Rolling Stone, John Lennon said, “It was a peak. Paul and I were definitely working together.”

Ringo Starr, the quartet’s other surviving member, writes in his introductory remarks to the new edition that “‘Sgt. Pepper’ seemed to capture the details

Unlike his loquacious and chatty dad Paul, James McCartney is a man of few, but well-chosen words. 

But get him one subject he is passionate about -- like animal rights and vegetarianism -- and he opens up a bit more.

"Hopefully animals won't be killed one day, preferably now as we live in the here and now, and they will be helped to live the lives they truly want to in their hearts," he said in a recent interview. "I know vegetarian/vegan/ayurvedic are the healthiest diets."

It's safe to say that McCartney will have plenty of vegetarian dining options when his tour hits Northampton at the Iron Horse Music Hall on April 7. 

McCartney is touring in support of his latest record, "The Blackberry Train," on which he worked with legendary producer Steve Albini (of Nirvana and Pixies fame). The opening track, the jangling rocker, "Too Hard," also features George Harrison's son Dhani on guitar and vocals. McCartney indicated that he and Albini got right down to work when it came to making the record.

By: George Lenker

Source: Mass Live

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The Beatles' George Harrison, the "quiet one," was in truth a kaleidoscopic force of nature. His songs and musicianship -- both with the fab four and beyond -- have not just aged well, but have become straight-up classics enshrined in the firmament of the 20th century music canon.

Without "If I Needed Someone," "I Me Mine," "Something," "Taxman," "Here Comes the Sun," or "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," the four would have been unbearably less fabulous. The same goes for his myriad of envelope-exploding contributions, including his chiming 12-string Fireglo Rickenbacker used throughout Hard Day's Night, his #wtf time-warped backward guitar on "I'm Only Sleeping" and his tamboura from the astral plane on "Tomorrow Never Knows." Harrison's genius is best summed-up perhaps with yet another of his underrated brilliant album cuts: "It's All Too Much."

And it never stopped. Harrison's 1970 magnum opus/dam burst following the Beatles' dissolution, All Things Must Pass, is filled with sublime sounds. The raw harmonica-driven "Apple Scruffs" could have been a White Album classic, his prostration before the universe in "My Sweet Lord" somehow became a pop s details

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