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John Lennon’s “Instant Karma!” had an intro reminiscent of an earlier song. The Beatles covered the earlier song.
Sean Ono Lennon discussed his reaction to “Instant Karma!” and his father’s music in general.

John Lennon‘s “Instant Karma!” is one of his most popular solo songs. During an interview, he said part of it sounded like an earlier track. Subsequently, John’s son, Sean Ono Lennon, discussed what he feels when he hears “Instant Karma!”The book Lennon on Lennon: Conversations with John Lennon features an interview from 1974. In the interview, John discusses some records he enjoyed. “Another American record, that nobody I know over here seems to have ever heard of,” he said. “And it’s called ‘Some Other Guy,’ by Richie Barrett. There is a strange bootleg of The Beatles singing it rather crappily from the Cavern somewhere way back in ’61.” One of The Beatles’ performances of the song can be found on the 1994 album Live at the BBC.

Source: Matthew Trzcinski/cheatsheet.com

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After John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr found global success with their music, they decided to expand into film with A Hard Day’s Night. The film was The Beatles’ first time acting on camera, and they did it with varying degrees of success. While they had fun shooting the film, watching it was a different story. The band’s press officer, Derek Taylor, said all but Harrison left during the band’s viewing of the film.

In 1964, The Beatles decided to further capitalize on Beatlemania by releasing a movie. In it, the band played themselves. McCartney explained that they had fun doing it, but he didn’t think they were particularly good actors.

“The first film we ever made, and we’re having a good time,” said McCartney, per the book George Harrison on George Harrison. “We’re not very good actors, but we’re trying hard. That’s the most important thing, really — having a try, isn’t it?”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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This year January 30th was the 54th anniversary of The Beatles' legendary rooftop concert at Apple Corps HQ in London's Savile Row. The 1969 event was the final live show The Beatles ever played and also brought an end to their then-upcoming documentary and final album, Let It Be. But once the Fab Four started playing loudly, police attended after receiving some noise complaints. And before long, arrests were threatened.

​Kenneth Womack, a Beatles scholar, recalled that the band's road manager, Mal Evans, was told the police were going to intervene unless the music stopped.​ ​

He explained: "The police demand that [The Beatles] turn down the sound or stop the concert. They tell Mal they intend to arrest The Beatles. At that point, Mal turns off George Harrison’s amplifier."​

However, after he turned off Harrison's amp, he was screamed out by the quiet Beatle, prompting him to turn it back on.

Evans, who was The Beatles' road manager, then recalled in his diary how he was then arrested by the police who were trying to shut down the live performance.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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No band has had more pages written about them than the Beatles. There are books that examine every day of the band’s history, large volumes about their recordings and books devoted entirely to their gear. Yet for all that has been written about them, there is still much mystery about the finer details, such as what exact guitars and amps they used to record specific songs.

We set out to answer that last question by closely examining a select group of songs spanning the Beatles’ entire recording history. A big part of the challenge is that a great amount of conflicting info exists, even among the experts. Even the members of the Beatles, producer George Martin and engineers like Geoff Emerick have provided conflicting accounts, and sometimes those people have contradicted themselves.

Photos taken during the recording sessions provide helpful hints, but all too often crucial details are missing, and the best anyone can do is speculate. Internet forums are frankly a hell-hole of highly opinionated alpha characters who insist they have golden ears but are usually pulling utter BS out of their golden rears.

Source: Chris Gill/Guitar

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It's a case of Love Me Do and Silly Love Songs for the ex-Beatle, who wrote My Valentine for his third wife Nancy. Ahead of February 14, Sir Paul told his website that he hides cards around the room “and sometimes things even spill into the next day - it’s completely silly”.

Sir Paul said: “I would say that being a father and being a husband are two completely different things.

“As far as being a dad is concerned, I’ve always just tried to give my kids a bit of guidance if they seem to need it - but that was mainly when they were younger.

“Now that they are older, they’re guiding me! They don’t need so much guidance these days but if there’s ever a problem, I’m very happy to be the guy they come to. So, that’s largely the thing of being a dad.

“You’re just there to help, and I suppose have fun with - we do have a lot of fun. Now they’re older we can have a drink together, for instance!

 

Source: Tara Fair/express.co.uk

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In addition to being a rock star, Paul McCartney is a husband and father, and those are two roles that are very important to him. In a new post on his website, the Beatles legend responds to a Twitter question about what the two roles mean to him, noting they are “two completely different things.”

“As far as being a dad is concerned, I’ve always just tried to give my kids a bit of guidance, if they seem to need it – but that was mainly when they were younger,” he explains. “Now that they are older, they’re guiding me! They don’t need so much guidance these days but if there’s ever a problem, I’m very happy to be the guy they come to.”

He adds, “You’re just there to help, and I suppose have fun with – we do have a lot of fun. Now they’re older we can have a drink together, for instance!”

As for being a husband, he says the most important thing is “just trying to be good to my wife Nancy (Shevell) and trying to be considerate and romantic.” And it sounds like Nancy can expect something special later this month.

Source: kslx.com

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In 1965, Queen Elizabeth awarded The Beatles MBEs, and John Lennon found the whole situation baffling. By appointing each member of the band a Member of the British Empire (MBE), the queen honored the band’s contributions to British society. It caused some controversy, though, and even the members of the band weren’t sure why they were receiving the honor. Lennon explained that he found the whole thing “daft” and said he hadn’t been a fan of the ceremony.In 1965, the queen awarded the band MBEs, which rewarded their contributions to society. This decision sparked controversy; some believed that giving The Beatles the distinction cheapened it for other recipients. The band was just as surprised as everyone else.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Louise Harrison, George Harrison's sister and eldest sibling, died on January 29th at age 91, according to The Daily Mail. Louise, who spent her final days in assisted living, was known to a generation of Beatles fans for her participation in countless fan convention across the U.S. and England, and even managed her own Beatles tribute band — the Liverpool Legends. Her younger brother, 89-year-old Harry — who like their late-brother Peter — worked for George until his retirement, remains the sole-surviving member of the original Liverpool Harrison clan.

Louise and her husband, Scottish mining engineer Gordon Caldwell, emigrated to the U.S. in the 1950's, eventually settling in Illinois. In 1963 as “Beatlemania” was blossoming across Britain, a still-unknown George and Peter Harrison visited their sister — marking George the first Beatles to visit the States — including Manhattan — months before his bandmates. Louise played an early role trying to get the Beatles played on U.S. radio.

Source: Music News/nightswithalicecooper.com

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When Beatles fans in America think of “Beatlemania” and the 1964 British Invasion, most think of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” as the signature song of that moment. They have good reason to do so: That track represented the band’s first No. 1 hit on this side of the Atlantic.

However, the Fab Four had notched several No. 1 hits in the UK by February of ’64. “Please Please Me,” the band’s first huge success on the charts, went all the way to No. 2 in early ’63. That April, “From Me to You” became the first chart-topping single on the Beatles’ resume.

In July , The Beatles were the dominant force in British pop and went to EMI studios on Abbey Road to record their next single. Prior to the actual recording session, the band took some publicity photos outside.

After they’d gone in to work on the recording, they experienced the type of scene later found in A Hard Day’s Night. In fact, that day, just as they were about to record “She Loves You,” screaming fans broke into the building, with one girl actually making it into their studio.

Source: Eric Schaal/ details

Ringo Starr is one of history’s best-known drummers, performing original songs like “Octopus’s Garden.” In one press conference, a teenager said he started playing the instrument because of this Beatles member. Of course, Starr had a hilarious response to the comment.

Ringo Starr was the last addition to the “Fab Four,” appearing alongside George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and John Lennon. He performed songs like “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” “Love Me Do,” and “A Hard Day’s Night.”

He was even the focus of the music comedy film, Help. The drummer appeared in the Beatles until they officially disbanded in 1970. Even afterward, Ringo Starr continued to play drums for other groups and as a solo artist.
“I’ll say it again: I love being in a band,” Starr said during an NPR interview. “I love playing with other human beings. I’ve never practiced drums unless there was another human being in the room. If you could play, I’d play with you all night. But if I’m just playing by myself, it gets boring pretty quick.”

Source: Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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David Crosby wasn’t fully onboard with one of George Harrison’s most important relationships. David Crosby said he was close friends with George Harrison. Afterward, David Crosby wrote a song about George Harrison.

David Crosby didn’t get along with many people, but he found a friend in George Harrison. Though Crosby didn’t agree with everything Harrison did — he even wrote a song about this — he valued his relationship with him. Crosby said that of all of The Beatles, Harrison was his favorite.

Crosby and Harrison got along, and the former Byrds artist was slightly concerned about a significant relationship in his life. When Harrison met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and had his spiritual awakening, Crosby was happy for him, but, not being religious himself, he wasn’t wholeheartedly accepting of the relationship.

Source:Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles have plenty of hidden gems that were never released to the public. Some of the unreleased recordings include fragments of other songs that were edited out. While writing “The End,” John Lennon and Paul McCartney combined two Beatles songs to create a song that ended the band on a high note.

While “The End” isn’t the final song on Abbey Road, it fittingly was the final song recorded collectively by the four members of The Beatles. It was written by Paul McCartney but is credited to the Lennon-McCartney duo. Initially, the song was meant to end Abbey Road, but the final song was later changed to “Her Majesty.”

Each member had a solo in “The End.” McCartney, Lennon, and George Harrison performed three two-bar guitar solos, while Ringo Starr performed a drum solo, despite normally disliking drum solos. In The Beatles Anthology, Starr recalled being against the idea but was inevitably convinced by the other members.

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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It took 53 years, but now, at last, The Beatles’ final public performance can be heard – with all the songs complete and uninterrupted. True, a split-screen sequence of the remarkable event on January 30, 1969, was the climax of Peter Jackson’s epic Get Back trilogy. But the film’s fascinating cutaways to the drama unfolding at ground level meant the music on the roof was not always in the foreground. Finally, a new mix by Giles Martin and Sam Okell presents virtually every second from the two reels of tape containing the rooftop session. Listening to this historic audio is a thrilling experience. Although no one knew at the time, this was The Beatles’ last gig. But it’s a perfect live finale – original, humorous and unprecedented: elements that are forever associated with The Beatles.

Source: Kevin Howlett/Yahoo news

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In an era when rockstars who had exciting and intimidating names began to emerge, The Beatles kept their real names, except Ringo Starr. Before Starr joined the band, The Beatles temporarily went under different names, with Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and George Harrison creating their own “showbiz names.”Ringo Starr joined The Beatles in 1962, becoming the band’s permanent drummer. Starr, born Richard Starkey, was the only band member who used a stage name. The nickname came from the drummer wearing many rings, and it began to stick. In a 1992 interview with Club Sandwich, McCartney said Ringo had previously established himself with the name at Butlin’s Holiday Camp, where several other stars started out. “Ringo was the only one who stayed with a stage name, Ringo Starr because he’d been to Butlin’s holiday camp,” McCartney explained. “This was the big difference between Ringo and us – it actually made a difference in a man’s life, in those days, whether or not you’d been to Butlin’s. And this was actually a true claim to fame: having done a complete season at Butlin’s, he was the consummate pro.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatshee details

Recorded as the B-side of “Get Back” on January 28, 1969, “Don’t Let Me Down” was first heard outside of the recording studio two days later, on January 30, when The Beatles played it a rooftop concert at Apple Studio in Savile Row, London. Written by John Lennon as an expression of his love for Yoko Ono, the song is heartfelt and passionate. As John told Rolling Stone magazine in 1970, “When it gets down to it, when you're drowning, you don't say, ‘I would be incredibly pleased if someone would have the foresight to notice me drowning and come and help me,’ you just scream.”

Joining The Beatles at Apple Studios for both sides of the single was keyboard player Billy Preston, who gives the track such a beautiful, gentle feel, contrasting brilliantly with the intensity of John’s lead vocal. Billy was credited on the Apple single and it charted in America, but airplay of “Get Back” predominated and propelled the A-side to No.1 on the charts for five weeks. By comparison, “Don’t Let Me Down” got much less exposure. It’s another of those B-side gems that, with the passing of time, people have come to appreciate more.

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Many bands are led by iconic lead singers, such as Freddie Mercury for Queen or Mick Jagger for The Rolling Stones. However, The Beatles were unique because they didn’t have an official leader. While John Lennon and Paul McCartney were responsible for most of The Beatles’ songs, George Harrison and Ringo Starr still made significant contributions. However, McCartney believed he was the “instigator” of The Beatles.

In an interview with The New York Times, McCartney reflected on the passing of George Harrison and the memories he had with the “Somebody” singer. One memory shared was when he hitchhiked with Harrison before The Beatles formed. He later got Lennon to join in during his “hitchhiking burst.”

“I often think of George because he was my little buddy,” McCartney said. “I was thinking the other day of my hitchhiking bursts. This was before the Beatles. I suddenly was keen on hitchhiking, so I sold this idea to George and then John.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles didn’t need Ringo Starr to be a songwriter. Paul McCartney and John Lennon took up those duties early in the band’s career. George Harrison grew his writing skills. Not being relied upon for songs lessened the pressure on the drummer, which Ringo said was a positive of being the fourth Beatle. Still, he attempted to write songs. When you go inside Ringo’s clunky songwriting process, it’s a miracle he ever got any tracks on Beatles albums.

The Beatles needed Ringo to be their drummer to become the Fab Four. His steady timekeeping skills were critical to the band. Ringo’s songwriting? Not so much.

When they weren’t covering songs, John and Paul teamed up to handle a lot of the early songwriting duties for the band. The duo retained that dynamic for much of The Beatles’ career.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr songs rarely made the cut on Beatles albums (he wrote two Fab Four tunes). His playing almost never received the credit it deserved, either. Ringo’s drumming — subtle and situated perfectly in the song — often made him the most overlooked member of The Beatles, and yet there were very few places in the world where nobody knew Ringo. Though often overlooked for his playing, Ringo’s weirdest drumming happened in the studio when George Harrison briefly quit the band.

Former drummer Pete Best lost interest in The Beatles when they went heavily psychedelic on 1967’s Magical Mystery Tour. Maybe he wasn’t listening to the Fab Four a year earlier.

Revolver was a watershed moment for the band as it moved away from the saccharine pop of their early days. The non-album B-side “Rain” was a big step into the Fab Four’s psychedelic period.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Badfinger liked January. The Apple Records signings had three UK Top 10 hits, each of which hit the British bestsellers in the first month of the year, for three years straight. On January 29, 1972, they debuted with the third of them, “Day After Day,” marking the second time they had a hit produced by a Beatle.

After having their debut chart entry “Come And Get It” written and produced by Paul McCartney, “Day After Day” (written by the group’s Pete Ham) was produced by George Harrison. He played some of the lead guitar on the track, while Leon Russell added piano; Badfinger had, of course, been part of George’s all-star Concert For Bangla Desh in New York the previous August, in which Russell also took part.

Source: Paul Sexton/yahoo.com

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The Beatles often advocated for peace with their music — and equality with their concerts. Here’s what Paul McCartney and the other Beatles said about the American Civil Rights Movement and being “honest about” their activism.

The Beatles sometimes made political statements with their music. “Get Back” acted as anti-immigrant satire and commentary on Britain’s attitude toward immigration. “Revolution,” co-written by Lennon, shared his thoughts on the global turmoil of the late 1960s.

“You say you got a real solution,” the lyrics state. “Well, you know / We’d all love to see the plan / You ask me for a contribution / Well, you know / We’re all doing what we can.”

According to Beatles Interviews, the interviewer mentioned one statement from the Beatles, where they said America was “a lousy country” for calling people who were Black the n-word. The artists stood behind their statements.

“This is it: that if you say anything against, say, the way Civil Rights gets treated over here, then there are bound to be extremist people who’ll think that we’re wrong for saying that colored peo details

The Beatles have influenced many artists in every genre. While Dolly Parton came from a vastly different background than The Beatles, she was still struck by one of their earliest hits in America that left her “feelin’ all kinds of emotions.”

In the early 1960s, The Beatles became one of the biggest artists in the U.K. “She Loves You” and “Please Please Me” were two early singles that put the band on the map in their native country. In 1963, The Beatles finally began to take over in the U.S. with “I Want to Hold Your Hand.”

The single was released in the U.S. with “I Saw Her Standing There” as the B-side. Its success in the U.S. marked the beginning of the British Invasion as the track peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the first Beatles song to achieve this accomplishment in the U.S. The track gained even more momentum after The Beatles performed it on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964.

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Madonna’s success upset Paul McCartney. He discussed how television defined the perception of the Queen of Pop.
Madonna said The Beatles influenced her but she was more interested in other types of music.

Paul McCartney said he didn’t like when Madonna became a big star. Subsequently, he said she came across as a “goddess” to normal people. Notably, the Queen of Pop explained why she wasn’t too interested in The Beatles when she was young.According to the 2015 book Conversations with McCartney, the “Silly Love Songs” singer was upset by Madonna’s success. “It makes me realize how people are affected by media,” he said.

“While you’re looking at her, from your little lowly room, on your little telly, you think she’s a goddess,” he added. “You give her all of that. She doesn’t even ask for it.”

Paul discussed the Queen of Pop’s tours. “Once she’s on tour, she’s selling out 30,000, she’s a goddess,” Paul added. “‘Look at the clothes she wears. No wonder. It’s because she’s better than us. We are only mortal, we’ve got tellies, and I bet details

Ringo Starr has been performing on stage for over 60 years since he began his career with The Beatles. However, the British drummer said he still experiences stage fright, even if the fear disappears shortly after taking the stage.

Starr joined The Beatles in 1962 after the band struggled to find the perfect drummer. While still a pivotal member of the band, much of the attention was often on Paul McCartney and John Lennon as most of the songs were written and sung by them. When The Beatles ended in 1970, each member went in their own direction, including Starr.

After releasing several solo albums and songs, Starr formed the All-Starr band in 1989, who he continues to tour with today. However, unlike most bands, the All-Starr band consists of a constantly rotating set of musicians. In an interview with USA Today, the “Octopus Garden” singer explained why he decided to have a constantly changing band.

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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In 1964, The Beatles attended a party at the British Embassy in Washington D.C., and Ringo Starr left with less hair than when he entered. Despite the relative exclusivity of the party, fans there were still overzealous with the band. Starr explained that people began behaving badly after a couple of drinks. One fan even snipped the hair from his head.In 1964, the band brought Beatlemania to America with their performances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Shortly after, they traveled to the nation’s capital. After a show at the Washington Coliseum, they reluctantly agreed to attend a party at the British Embassy.“We always tried to get out of those crap things,” George Harrison said in the book The Beatles: The Authorized Biography by Hunter Davies. “But that time [in Washington] we got caught. They are always full of snobby people who really loathe our type, but want to see us because we’re rich and famous. It’s all hypocrisy. They were just trying to get publicity for the embassy.”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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