Search
Filters
Close

 

Beatles News

Before The Beatles went to America and after The Ronettes recorded “Be My Baby,” John Lennon met Ronnie Spector at a party. They instantly clicked. Maybe almost too well. John put the moves on Spector, and she had to deny his advances quickly.

According to People, The Beatles officially met The Ronettes at a show-business party in London. The Ronettes were over the pond for their first U.K. tour. The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and more welcomed the trio and made them feel a part of the music scene.

Spector had heard that the Fab Four wanted to be introduced to them. “They had seen us on Sunday Night at the London Palladium and they said, ‘We have got to meet these girls with the black long hair and slits up the side,'” Spector said.

Source: cheatsheet.com

Read More<<<

details

Sir Paul McCartney will join other figures from the world of music in a radio special to pay tribute to Liverpool-born presenter Janice Long.

The BBC has announced plans to celebrate Long with a tribute programme hosted by Zoe Ball and featuring a number of artists, including the former Beatle.

Long, who was born in Liverpool in 1955, became the first woman to have her own daily show on Radio 1 and the first regular female presenter on Top Of The Pops.

She died at home on Christmas Day at the age of 66, following a short illness.

'A Life In Music' will broadcast on Radio 2 on January 23 and feature family, friends and the musicians she helped during her 40-year career in broadcasting.

Sir Paul will discuss his “old Liverpool mate” who was always “a pleasure to meet” and voice his sadness “at the loss of a great Scouse girl”.

Source: Alex Green, PA Senior Entertainment Reporter/liverpoolecho.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

“The Beatles: Get Back” is a feat of modern cinema. Spanning nearly eight hours and chronicling the development of one of the greatest albums of all time, this film pushes fans to reconsider how and why The Beatles broke up.

The footage was pulled from director Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s 1970 film, “Let It Be” and its unused recordings. Originally to be released as a TV special, “Let It Be” transformed into a documentary film capturing the development of the Beatles’ twelfth studio album by the same name.

When Jackson began looking through the footage, he stated, “I was thinking, I’d love to make a Beatles film, but I don’t want to make the Beatles-breakup film. That’s the one Beatles movie I would never want to make.” Jackson maintained this mindset throughout the film’s creation.

Source: dukechronicle.com

Read More<<<

details

The Beatles were a British rock band active during the 1960s, and recognized as the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed in the history of popular and rock music. Formed in Liverpool, it was constituted from 1962 by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. Rooted in skiffle, beat music, and 1950s rock and roll, their sound would often incorporate elements of classical and traditional pop music, among others, in innovative ways in their songs; the band would later go on to work with a wide range of musical styles, ranging from ballads and Indian music, to psychedelia and even hard rock.

Source: McCartney Times

Read more<<<

details

Full disclosure: I’m more of a Stones guy than a Beatles guy, and some early Beatles (Love Me Do, I Wanna Hold Your Hand, and the like) I can find incredibly irritating. Now, sometime around Revolver, I took a turn and most of their albums from then on I like quite a bit. Abbey Road, in particular, I consider to be a stone-cold masterpiece. Although I still think The White Album has way too much filler (Ob-La-Di, Rocky Raccoon, and so forth).

What I’m getting at here is that I didn’t come to Peter Jackson’s seven-plus hour, three-episode series for Disney on bended knee—quite the contrary. I came to Get Back not as a fanboy but as an interested critic.

So, with that preamble out of the way, let me just say, this is a fascinating piece of work. The first part of the initial episode gives the viewer a quick overview of “Beatlemania” before bringing us to what would be the Beatles’ sessions for the recording of their last studio album, Let It Be in 1969 (Abbey Road was actually recorded after Let It Be, but released before).

Source: David Phillips/awardsdaily.com

Read More<<< details

Watching Peter Jackson’s documentary “The Beatles: Get Back” streaming on Disney+ was a split experience — utterly pedestrian but transplendent and deeply moving.

It was tedious slogging through eight hours of interrupted rehearsal takes, repetitive chit-chat and countless cigarettes, bottles of beer and slices of marmaladed toast consumed in London recording studios during 1969’s opening weeks. Dramatic cinema — and musicmaking — it wasn’t.

Yet thanks to Jackson’s extraordinary digital restoration, along with unfettered access the band gave original director Michael Lindsay-Hogg for an intended behind-the-scenes concert film, the intimate, immediate quality of the three-part miniseries is riveting. It wasn’t just who the four lads were (though they displayed their creative genius even just riffing around) but also when they were, at least for those of us who came of age during their reign.

Source: Allan Ripp/nypost.com

Read More<<<

details

Acclaimed singer-songwriter Rickie Lee Jones joined host Kenneth Womack to talk about her musical roots, having her 10-year-old world rocked by the Beatles, her recent memoir and more on "Everything Fab Four," a podcast co-produced by me and Womack (a music scholar who also writes about pop music for Salon) and distributed by Salon.

Jones, the two-time Grammy award winner behind the 1979 hit "Chuck E.'s in Love" (which Womack calls "a breath of fresh air"), describes growing up in her family as a "musical incubator." Her grandfather was a successful Vaudevillian performer, and her father and uncles were all musicians who raised her on jazz and popular records in the '50s and '60s. As she tells Womack, being a singer was considered important and "an acceptable job" in her household, with her mother even encouraging her to follow that dream.

Source: salon.com

Read More<<<

details
In my ears and in my eyes - Saturday, January 15, 2022

Paul McCartney never wrote an autobiography. He argued that his remarkable life story is “all in the songs” — the hundreds upon hundreds of timeless, instantly engrossing classics that have become the soundtrack to Western culture.One hundred and fifty-four of these musical gems are gathered in The Lyrics — a gripping commentary on the inspiration for the tunes, their making and the characters they portray. From boyhood creations such as “I lost my girl” written at the tender age of 14 following the untimely death of his mother, to “Penny Lane”, “Yesterday”, “A Day In A Life”, “Let It Be”, “Hey Jude”, “Back In The USSR”, “The Long And Winding Road” and “Mull of Kintyre” among many iconic others.

Source: Hannah Gal/thecritic.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

George Harrison had a lot of support from his family, especially his sister Louise when he joined The Beatles. His mother (also Louise) was his No. 1 fan. She answered fan mail, invited some of her son’s loyal fans to tea, and even became pen pals with one of them.

Initially, George’s father was less-than-enthusiastic about his son quitting his job to become a full-time musician. Yet, he was just as much involved with George’s fans as his wife.

However, George’s sister had an even bigger job; helping her little brother reach stardom.

In 1963, The Beatles decided to take a holiday. John Lennon took his wife Cynthia to Paris, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr went to Greece, and George visited his sister in America. On Sept. 16, George flew to the States with his older brother, Peter, becoming the first Beatle to do so.

Louise ‘Lou’ Caldwell lived at 113 McCann Street in Benton, Illinois, at the time. Louise had recently immigrated there with her husband Gordon, a nearby coal mine engineer. Benton, Illinois, is a small town, but George welcomed the quiet after experiencing the first waves of Beatlemania. No one recognized him, and he could experience some American s details

Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson's acclaimed documentary series The Beatles: Get Back is getting a Blu-ray release.

The three-part series on Disney+ has become a phenomenon with fans with its three-part documentation of the final days of The Beatles as they recorded their Let it Be album.

If you don't have Disney+ (you should get it!) or simply want to add the Blu-ray to your collection, Zavvi will be releasing The Beatles: Get Back on home video on February 28, 2022 for the special price of £29.99.

Source: Justin Harp/digitalspy.com

Read More<<<

details

PAUL MCCARTNEY prevented The Beatles' road manager from being arrested during the legendary rooftop concert in 1969 by doing something he didn't expect. After he was saved, John Lennon couldn't help but crack a joke.
In 1969 The Beatles decided to finish off their documentary, Let It Be, with a bang by performing some of their newest and biggest tracks on the roof of their Apple Corps headquarters. The band had not performed publicly for a few years and were working on writing and recording what would become their final album, 1970's Let It Be. But once they got on the roof of their Savile Row building on January 30, 1969, the police were not very happy.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

The resurgent interest in vinyl LPs has resulted in more and more people surveying record shop bins like musical archaeologists. The careful eye and ear can trace cultural shifts, breaks, and trends through the images and sounds of 12-inch vinyl LPs encased in cardboard sleeves. The diligent (or obsessed) explorer will occasionally come across a record that stands out from the rest in both its aesthetic presentation and, perhaps, sonic appeal that hints at something significant.

Such is the experience of encountering The Concert for Bangladesh, a three-record set released on 20 December 1971. The recording is encased in a plain burnt-orange box whose design might have seemed innovative at the time but rarely escapes the wear and tear of five decades’ worth of use.

Source: Rick Quinn/popmatters.com

Read More<<<

details

As someone who likes the Beatles but is nowhere near a superfan, I've found the recent Peter Jackson documentary about the group equal parts boring and fascinating; on a couple of nights, it did a great job of putting me to sleep. Given what I do for a living, it's probably no surprise that the fashion is what really succeeded in holding my attention. John, Paul, George and Ringo were certainly a well-dressed group of lads.

I love seeing the more casual outfits they wore to write, rehearse and record, but they also really knew how to serve a look for special, public-facing moments — especially, in my opinion, George Harrison, who seemed to have a penchant for glamorous winter outerwear. So it's no surprise that for his January 1966 wedding to supermodel Patti Boyd, he topped his suit with a sumptuous fur coat. As they stepped out of the London registry office, Boyd, too, covered her mod-era short dress with an opulent fur. There was something about celebrity weddings during this era (or maybe just rock-star weddings) where personal style seemed to eclipse tradition when it came to clothing.

 

Source: fashionista.com

details

Multi-instrumentalist Davey Johnstone has been Elton John’s guitarist for 50 years, which hasn’t left him with much free time to focus on his solo career — his debut LP, Smiling Face, came out on Elton’s Rocket Record Company label way back in 1973, and it’s taken him this long to make a follow-up album. Johnstone found the time, obviously, during 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic put a temporary halt to Elton’s Farewell Yellow Brick Road tour — and the result is Deeper Than My Roots, a family affair featuring musical contributions from four of Johnstone’s sons and artwork by his daughter Juliet. Fifteen-year-old Elliot, Johnstone’s youngest child, sings lead on most of the tracks, including a cover of “Here, There and Everywhere,” which Johnstone describes as “one of the great Beatles songs of all time.”

Source: Lyndsey Parker/yahoo.com

Read More<<<

details

Unfortunately, John Lennon did not perform at Woodstock Music and Arts Festival. The festival’s co-creator, Michael Lang, died on Jan. 8. The famous music festival was the crowning jewel of Lang’s career in the music industry. However, it wasn’t without its hiccups. Among other issues, Lang had a problem getting some of the acts he wanted to perform during the three-day festival, including John.

However, The Beatles, who were breaking up at the time, and the U.S. government barred John from performing.

In 1969, The Beatles were on the brink of breaking up. By then, each of the Fab Four thought about leaving at some point or another. We recently saw what happened when George Harrison briefly quit the group in Peter Jackson’s new three-part documentary, The Beatles: Get Back.

So, when Lang was getting the lineup for Woodstock together at the time, it was doubtful that he’d be able to get one of the biggest bands in the world as they were on the outs with each other.

Source: cheatsheet.com

Read More<<<

details

What makes an album cover controversial? In the classic 1984 rock mockumentary This Is Spinal Tap, record industry executive Bobbi Flekman (played by the great Fran Drescher) finds herself embroiled in an argument with band manager Ian Faith about exactly that, while discussing the proposed artwork for new record Smell The Glove.

“You put a greased naked woman on all fours with a dog collar around her neck, and a leash, and a man’s arm extended out up to here, holding onto the leash, and pushing a black glove in her face to sniff it,” points out Flekman. “You don’t find that offensive? You don’t find that sexist?”

Faith can’t see the problem: “Well you shoulda seen the cover they wanted to do,” he shoots back. “It wasn’t a glove, believe me.”

Source: independent.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

In the newly released documentary “The Beatles: Get Back,” famed director Peter Jackson highlights the band’s professional relationships, business approach and, most interestingly, their creative process during a recording session in January 1969. While The Beatles are globally regarded as one of the most successful and influential bands of all time, five business lessons can be learned from observing their creative and innovative process unfold during rehearsals — lessons that can be applied to all work settings, regardless of the discipline.

1. Collective compromise builds strong teams
While Paul and George were discussing how to finish a song, their views clashed, with neither musician willing to compromise. This ultimately led George to quit the project and the band. Several days and some discussions later, a compromise was reached, and George re-joined the band.

Source: José Valentino Ruiz/news.ufl.edu

Read More<<<

details

The legendary band members of The Beatles are still considered experts in the music industry to this day. Paul McCartney and John Lennon's songwriting is still unparalleled to this day, and the blend of their two voices is endlessly iconic. So then it is extraordinary to hear McCartney declare one rock band from the 1990s were vocally better than him and his songwriting pal.McCartney spoke to journalist Ian Halperin where he discussed the state of rock music at the time. He confessed that a lot of the bands around were "a lot more technical" than The Beatles were.

This is a no brainer considering how much music and music production had changed between the Fab Four's final album (1970's Let It Be) and 2008's chart-toppers Kings of Leon. But McCartney's gaze was fixed on the comedic pop-rockers the Barenaked Ladies.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

By his own admission, David Crosby is the country’s third-most famous stoner, behind Willie Nelson and Snoop Dogg. He’s an iconic musician who’s found an enthusiastic sideline rating people’s joints on social media. And he’s looking to leverage that persona into a profitable business selling weed.

His explanation? “Well, I like getting stoned,” he told the Los Angeles Times in a new interview for their video series The Green Room.

He went on to cite the experience of getting high with his wife and son. “I like the bonding,” Crosby said, and recounted his memories of getting high and playing Words With Friends with his wife. Given that he’s been married to his wife Jan for 43 years and says weed is central to their marriage, he might be on to something.

Source: Tobias Carroll/insidehook.com

Read More<<<

details

When I first saw the photograph, I was a bit confused. One was Beatle John Lennon because his name was written in bold, but who was the other similar-looking person?

Well, it’s New York photographer Eric Kogan who is often traveling by foot in Manhattan. He loves street photography as it engages him with his surroundings, and he can see something new even in mundane or familiar places.

On the afternoon of October 25, 2020, Kogan was running errands. John Lennon was not on his mind at all when he dressed up to leave his house. New York was on a COVID-19 lockdown and how he looked or dressed was not of any concern.

At Houston Street near West Broadway in Manhattan, an intersection he passed very frequently, Kogan suddenly stopped in his tracks and did a double-take. Oh, yes, it was John Lennon, but…why does Lennon suddenly look so familiar? Of course, he spotted a resemblance for the first time!

Source: petapixel.com

Read More<<<

details

George Harrison named his son Dhani Harrison after two notes in the Indian music scale. Having a name representing George’s favorite thing, plus being the child of an ex-Beatle, sort of sealed Dhani’s fate of following in his father’s footsteps.

However, Dhani resisted going into the family business for most of his childhood and young adult life.

For Dhani, growing up at Friar Park was interesting, to say the least. He used to tell his friends that his dad “pushes buttons” for a living. He had no idea that those buttons were making hit albums.

“I hung out with my parents. I was always trying to be with the big kids, and the big kids at my house were like (ELO frontman) Jeff Lynne,” Dhani told Daily Mail. “You’d come home and it was like, ‘Bob Dylan’s here.’ It’s hard to get a bit of perspective on, like, ‘How did your school test go today?'”

Source: cheatsheet.com

Read More<<<

details

A sumptuous new offering from Genesis Publications, "Mike McCartney's Early Liverpool" vividly traces the life and times of the city that birthed the 20th century's most resounding musical revolution.

An exquisite mélange of original photographs, drawings, and language, "Mike McCartney's Early Liverpool" reflects the author's keen sense of history. As the younger brother of pop virtuoso Paul McCartney, Mike McCartney enjoyed a bird's-eye view of the pre-fame Beatles and the city that made them.

Later, as the Fab Four conquered the global music charts in the 1960s, Mike McCartney left his job at a salon and took his own stab at greatness via the Scaffold, a group of the younger McCartney's Liverpool mates bent on taking a humorous approach to the Mersey Sound. They would score a chart-topper of their own in 1968 with "Lily the Pink."

Source: salon.com

Read More<<<

details

Sir Paul McCartney was left "very sad" following the death of Janice Long.

The Beatles singer has paid tribute to the veteran broadcaster - who was the first woman to regularly host 'Top of the Pops' - after she passed away at her home on Christmas Day (25.12.21) aged 66 following a short illness.

Paul took to Twitter on Friday (07.01.22) to share a photo of himself and his "old Liverpudlian friend" standing around a jukebox and wrote: "I was very sad to hear that my old Liverpudlian friend Janice Long has passed away.

“Janice was a fun-loving lady who always had a twinkle in her eye. She was very knowledgeable about the music scene and whenever we met it was a pleasure and we had a great laugh.”

Source: Celebretainment/purdueexponent.org

Read More<<<

details

Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider took his official Twitter account to reply to a post saying that ‘We’re Not Gonna Take It’ has the same drum introduction as George Harrison’s hit song ‘Got My Mind Set On You.’

Twisted Sister dropped ‘We’re Not Gonna Take It’ in their 1984 studio album ‘Stay Hungry.’ The song was initially released as a single two weeks before the album, and it became the band’s highest-selling single in the United States. It was written by Dee Snider, and was later covered by various musicians.

On the other hand, George Harrison’s ‘Got My Mind Set On You was released in Harrison’s 1987 album ‘Cloud Nine.’ The song was originally recorded by James Ray in 1962 and Harrison decided to release a cover version. It achieved great commercial success and quickly reached No. 1 in various charts.

Source: Bihter Sevinc/metalheadzone.com

Read More<<<

details

Sir Nick met Sir Paul only once, but it was memorable. It was at Royal Albert Hall. Yes, that one.

Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall.

Elton John made the introduction.

Nick Faldo was pleased to learn that the Beatle, an icon of our culture, knew who he was. “Paul McCartney,” Faldo said the other day. You could hear a hint of awe, as Faldo said the name. You know the accent, from his many years in many CBS towers. “So that was a nice bit.”

But it’s not surprising that McCartney would know Nick Faldo’s name, and the sporting life behind it. He reads the paper. He likely owns a telly. We’re not talking Dylan here.

Source: golf.com

Read More<<<

details
Beatles Radio Listener Poll
What Beatles Era do you like better?