Beatles News

“I had a lot of emotional abuse with my mother; she was schizophrenic,” said Kaya John as she discussed her book, “When Life Sends You Lemons, Make Lennonaid: What John Lennon’s Life Did For Mine” (Balboa Press, 192 pp., $14.99), a story of how The Beatles and, in particular, John Lennon saved her from a path of self-destruction due to, among other things, abusive parents.

“She went into a very dark period where her insane anger just overtook her, and I was the target for it,” continued John. “And on my father’s end, there was very violent sexual abuse and, of course, that’s coming to the forefront in our culture and our world right now in a lot of different areas. It’s interesting because it took me a lot of years to write this book, and the timing of it seems to be rather amazing considering how that’s surfacing.

“A lot of people like The Beatles (and) there’s been a lot of books written about The Beatles but I’ve never read a really serious, personal book, written by a Beatles fan (about) how they affected their life. How they transformed their life, what they learned from The Beatles. And in my case, they helped me surv details

Blast from the past - Sunday, March 18, 2018

In February 1968, members of the legendary rock band, The Beatles, arrived in Rishikesh for a "momentous" sojourn. A teenage rebel — a diehard Beatles fan himself — watched them with keen interest. Five decades later, he has compiled an account of their stay here, and maintains that the three-year period that marked their affair with India was particularly significant in the life of the band.
"This is when The Beatles reinvented themselves from being the world's most famous pop stars into pioneering musical artists, creating new parameters of contemporary music," says Ajoy Bose, who has written an exhaustive account of their journey in Across The Universe: The Beatles in India.

Musical note
Bose, a well-known journalist, finds it interesting that their growing relationship with India, "led by George Harrison, who was particularly into Indian music, culture and religion, went side by side with their experiments with narcotics and psychedelic drugs".

Source: The Tribune



On March 24, a unique archive of photographs of the Beatles will go on sale and is expected to fetch at least $350,000 at auction. Photographer Mike Mitchell was just 18 when he shot the Beatles' first US concert in 1964, and the 413 negatives with full copyright are available to purchase. Mike's story of how the photographs came about is compelling.

"I was in a point in my life where I was learning that photography could take me anywhere," explains Mike, more than 50 years later. Because of the equipment that he had available, Mike shot in black and white without flash and used only available light.
Coming two days after The Beatles legendary appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Mitchell also attended the press conference before the gig at the Washington Coliseum, before photographing them again a month later at the Baltimore Civic Center. With virtually no restrictions, Mitchell shot with the intention of creating portraits rather than merely documenting the events and was able to move freely about the stage, producing an intimate encounter with a group that was bringing something completely different to popular culture.

Source: Andy Day /


1. The Beatles first fan was Irish. The Beatles Tune-In author Mark Lewisohn tracked down Pat Moran who was originally from a strict Irish Catholic home in Liverpool. In a letter written to Pat from 1960 Paul McCartney described her as the band's "number one fan." As Lewisohn suggests something in The Beatles story touched Pat deeply, her father wasn't such a fan sending his daughter to confession after committing the "sin" of chattering about The Beatles non-stop. She sent food parcels, gave them money and even arranged a holiday for the struggling musicians before losing touch when joining the Royal Air Force.

2. The notoriously private George Harrison came from an Irish Catholic family on his mother's side. Unusually for the time his grandparents never married. The Beatles Tune-In author suggests the secretive aspect to his family and their suspicion of "nosy neighbours" had a lasting effect on Harrison's attitude.

3. John Lennon's mother Julia survived an IRA bomb on 3rd May 1939. Julia Lennon worked as an usherette in the Trocadero cinema where one of two tear-gas bombs went off that night. There was no loss of life but fifteen patrons were treated in hospital.

Source: Richard Purden/ details

In February 1968, members of the legendary rock band, The Beatles, arrived in Rishikesh for a "momentous" sojourn. A teenage rebel -- a diehard Beatles fan himself -- watched them with keen interest. Five decades later, he has compiled an account of their stay here, and maintains that the three-year period that marked their affair with India was particularly significant in the life of the band.

"This is when The Beatles reinvented themselves from being the world's most famous pop stars into pioneering musical artists, creating new parameters of contemporary music," says Ajoy Bose, who has written an exhaustive account of their journey in "Across The Universe: The Beatles in India".

Bose, a well-known journalist, finds it interesting that their growing relationship with India, "led by George Harrison, who was particularly into Indian music, culture and religion, went side by side with their experiments with narcotics and psychedelic drugs".

Source: IANS/



In what is quite possibly one of the most nostalgia-inducing pieces of music ever created, one man has combined two of the 20th century’s most popular cultural creations into one super tune.

Josef Kenny has worked in production and remixes for other people, and writes music inspired by synth-pop and funk, but the Eleanor Rigby battle theme might be his best work yet.

Combining the famous Beatles song with the battle music from early Pokemon games, it really is a treat for the ears as well as the memory.

“I based the arrangement on the music from the first-generation, original Pokemon games,” Kenny told the Press Association. “Specifically the music that plays when you encounter a wild Pokemon.
“Junichi Masuda’s battle music for that game is quite similar to George Martin’s backing string arrangement for Eleanor Rigby,” he continued.




Move over, Brooklyn Beckham and Chloë Grace Moretz—there may be a new young power couple in town: Ava Phillippe and Arthur Donald.

After stunning the world at Le Bal des Débutantes in Paris, many assumed Ava Phillippe, Reese Witherspoon and Ryan Phillippe's glamorous daughter, may have been interested in Maharaja Padmanabh Singh of Jaipur, who escorted her to the debutante ball. But it turns out she may have her eye on someone else. While on the London leg of the press tour to support her mom in A Wrinkle in Time, Phillippe and Arthur Donald, a grandson of Paul McCartney, were spotted heading to Sketch, an all-pink 18th-century tearoom turned cocktail lounge.
Arthur, the son of Stella McCartney's sister, the photographer Mary McCartney, recently left the United Kingdom for the United States to continue his studies at Yale. Phillippe has yet to announce which university she will be attending, but in July 2017 her dad told the hosts of Live! with Kelly and Ryan that she will be college bound very soon. Hopefully we'll get those happy campus move-in pics soon enough, just like we got with Malia Obama and Brooklyn Beckham.

Source: by Brooke Marine/The Descendants


Council to purchase iconic theatre where The Beatles played for £2.6m

An iconic building where household names such as The Beatles once performed is set to have new life breathed into it after Waltham Forest Council purchases it for £2.6 million.

The former Granada cinema, also known as the EMD, in Walthamstow’s Hoe Street is set to become a 1,000-seat venue to host the biggest names in UK and international comedy, pantomimes, film screenings and more.

The historic Grade II* listed theatre was partially reopened in 2016 as Mirth, Marvel & Maud, a pub and entertainment complex.

It will be brought back to its former glory with the help of Soho Theatre, who will operate the venue, and is expected to add between £34 and £52 million to Walthamstow’s economy over a 10 year period.

Source: Laura O'Callaghan/



Jenny Boyd, sister of George Harrison’s first wife, Pattie, and an ambassador for The Beatles Story in Liverpool, tells Abigail Healy her fascinating story.

How did you first become involved with The Beatles?
It was when my sister, Pattie, began going out with George [Harrison]. We would often all go to the latest nightclubs in London together.

Why is now the ideal time for an exhibition about The Beatles in India at The Beatles Story in Liverpool?

It’s 50 years since they were in India. That time had such a huge impact on so many people. It was not only their music, but also their influence in bringing the benefits of meditation to the West.

How did you end up joining The Beatles’ trip to India in 1968?
I was staying with Pattie and George in Surrey, having returned from six months in San Francisco. One evening I went with them and joined the rest of The Beatles to see the guru, Maharishi, speak in London. Not long afterwards we saw Maharishi again at the retreat in Bangor. On our return to London, having discussed it with Pattie, George asked me if I’d like
to accompany them to Maharishi’s ashram in details

A legend of popular music has donated a signed box set exploring one of the most iconic albums of all time to help parents who have lost a child.

A signed Beatles set of six discs has been handed to the Forever Stars charity - straight from Sir Paul McCartney's personal collection.

The legendary musician and songwriter will even personalise the set with his signature and a message once it is sold at auction.

The lot has been described as the "Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band super deluxe, six-disc set" and carries an estimate of between £250 and £500.

It will be sold at Hansons Auctioneers, in Heage Lane, Etwall, in a specialist music sale on Wednesday, March 14.

Source: Ben Waldron/



Paul McCartney’s 1967 Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 is one in a number of celebrity cars that will be sold at Bonham’s upcoming Goodwood Members’ Meeting auction.

The Lamborghini was purchased by McCartney at the height of The Beatles’ success and was owned by him while they recorded Yellow Submarine and worked on the animated film of the same name. The car also appeared in ‘Anthology of The Beatles‘ – a 1996 BBC TV series focused around the band. This example, which features a 320 hp 4.0-liter V12, was purchased new by McCartney in February of 1968. It has had just four owners from new, with the most recent acquiring it back in 2011. It has been stored in a climate-controlled environment at Lamborghini Hong Kong for much of that time.



Memorial garden for ex-Beatle - Monday, March 12, 2018

THE widow of George Harrison has agreed to support the creation of a memorial garden in Henley.

Mayor Kellie Hinton wrote to Olivia Harrison to see if she would back the idea and her husband’s charity confirmed she was in favour.

The town council will now work with Mrs Harrison and the Material World Foundation to find a suitable location.

Plans for a memorial in the town have been mooted for years. Mrs Harrison was against plans for a statue to the former Beatle, who lived at Friar Park. Councillor Hinton said: “We were only comfortable doing something if Olivia was going to support us.

“We know from previous discussions that she did not want anything near the house. We looked at locations in Mill and Marsh Meadows, which are tranquil and by the river. There were other areas we looked at which could be suitable.”

The Mayor met with representatives of the foundation in October, when they discussed the possibility of a garden. Cllr Hinton said: “We had a 45-minute meeting and went over some of the possible locations, which they could look at in their own time. On the same day we had a message saying they wanted to do it.



Shots of The Beatles’ first US concerts are expected to sell for £250,000 ($347,000) at auction. Mike Mitchell, 18 at the time, snapped hundreds of never-before-seen photographs of the band’s performances at the Washington Coliseum and the Baltimore Civic Centre in 1964. The negatives, taken only with ambient light as Mitchell had no flash, have sat for decades in his basement.

Source: The Guardian



The day after The Beatles’ Cardiff show, manager Brian Epstein and the bandmates met with Walter Shenson, the producer who brought them to the big screen in A Hard Day’s Night and Help!

While the meeting was certainly less climactic than the previous evening’s concert, the day’s events held great portents nonetheless. Brian had arranged the meeting so that Walter could pitch a third feature film to the group. This time, the deal involved another property for United Artists titled A Talent for Loving.

Based on Richard Condon’s novel of the same name, A Talent for Loving would depict the four lads from Liverpool transplanted into an 1870s-era western as pioneering frontiersmen. But for the first time, the Beatles weren’t having it, voting unanimously – all for one and one for all, as was their practice – to reject Shenson’s gambit outright.

Source: Ken Womack/



You might only know the Beatles as John, Paul, George and Ringo, but before there was a Starr, there was a Best. Often called the fifth Beatle, Pete Best was a member of the Fab Four just when Beatlemania was becoming a thing between 1960 and 1962.

Once the band -- with the help of manager Brian Epstein -- decided to replace Best with Starr, Beatles fans were outraged, chanting, "Pete forever, Ringo never!" And in their defense, Best is definitely still the best-looking out of the mop-top crew.

So, what's he up to now? On March 30-31, he and his brother Roag Best will be performing, answering questions and signing autographs at Queen Bee's (3925 Ohio Street) for the San Diego Beatles Fair.

Source: By Rutger Rosenborg/



The Liverpudlian who put the Beatles in suits, landed them a record deal with Parlophone, and brought to them to “The Ed Sullivan Show” is getting the biopic treatment from Bravo. Bravo is developing a limited series based on the life of Brian Epstein, the Beatles manager who helped steer them to “the toppermost of the poppermost” from the early 1960s until his death of a drug overdose in August 1967 at the age of 32.

Produced by Universal Cable Productions and Sonar Entertainment, the project is based on “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story,” the Dark Horse Comics graphic novel penned by Vivek J. Tiwary with art by Andrew C. Robinson and Kyle Baker. Tiwary will pen the series adaptation and serve as executive producer along with Leopoldo Gout. Bravo said the project has secured access to the Lennon-McCartney song catalog for use in the series.

Epstein is an enigmatic figure in the history of the legendary band. He struggled with internal and external demons and discrimination as a Jewish, closeted gay man living at a time when homosexuality was a felony in Britain.

Source: By Cynthia Littleton /Variety


On display in a museum in Liverpool is a tiny record that changed the history of music.

Made in 1962, it holds a recording of "Hello Little Girl" by a then-unknown band called "John Lennon and the Beatles".

The Fab Four were struggling to get a record deal when their manager took this record to a meeting with George Martin, the man who would become known as "the fifth Beatle".

He saw the potential in the music group that day - and the rest is history.

This is the amazing story of the record that started it all:

Source: ITV Report

Listen Here<<<


George Harrison is today best remembered as the spiritual Beatle, but when he wrote "Blue Jay Way,” he was still helping invent rock star protocol. The Beatles already formed rock music from the Cavern they were carved in, and Harrison lived the lifestyle to its fullest. He was single the longest, married a model – perennial musical muse Pattie Boyd, rented rich people’s houses in the Hollywood Hills and went slumming in Haight-Ashbury. He was the youngest Beatle, born on Feb. 25, 1943. For what would have been Harrison’s 75th birthday, the band’s official Vevo YouTube site dropped the music video for “Blue Jay Way.” The clip is an excerpt of The Beatles' 1967 television film Magical Mystery Tour.




A motorcycle once owned by Beatles legend John Lennon has fetched a record-breaking £57,500 at auction.

The 1969 Honda Z50A Monkey Bike sold for almost double the estimated £30,000 when it went under the hammer at the National Motorcycle Museum in Solihull.

Lennon used the bike to get around his Tittenhurst Park estate in Berkshire, where he lived from 1969 to 1971.

It was sold by John Harington, who had owned it for 47 years and displayed it at various shows.

He bought the bike from Henry Graham, of Hook, Hampshire, who said he had bought the motorbike from Lennon when he was living at Tittenhurst Park.

The successful bid on Sunday is the highest price ever paid at a public auction for a Honda Monkey Bike.

Source: BBC News


The Beatles members forewent a journey of fame and fortune during their lives, but not without a struggle.

Visiting Scholar Walter Everett, Professor of Music Theory from the University of Michigan, gave a presentation March 6 about unfolding the psychology and success of the fab-four. Katie Kapurch, assistant professor of English, invited Everett to speak at Texas State. She met Everett at a Beatles conference at Penn State in 2014. She said after he read one of her publications, they decided to collaborate because they shared similar interests related to the representation of sex, sexuality and gender in pop culture.

Kapurch said they have contracted with Bloomsbury for a book with the working title, “Sex and Gender in Rock and Pop from the Beatles to Beyoncé”. The free co-sponsored event featured a presentation that delved into the composition of the 1967 single “Strawberry Fields Forever”. Everett has published an acclaimed two-volume book “The Beatles as Musicians” and stands at the forefront of scholarly research on The Beatles.

Source: Diana Furman/

Read More<<<< details

The Beatles were arguably one of the greatest and most talented rock groups of all time. Consisting of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr, this unassuming quartet arguably changed the face of popular music completely thanks to the music they crafted during their nine-year stint.

But have you ever wondered how far the apple fell from the tree? With Ringo’s son, Zak Starkey, hitting up Melbourne for a couple of shows with his band SSHH this weekend, we’ve decided to take a look at the musical careers undertaken by the offspring of one of music’s greatest groups.

Source: Tyler Jenke/



As hairdresser to the Beatles in the 1960s, Leslie Cavendish was exposed to sex, drugs and rock n’ roll. However, working for Vidal Sassoon, the most famous hairdresser of the time, he was under strict instructions that the female clientele – including Jane Asher, Mary Quant and singer Shirley Bassey – were off limits. And drugs didn’t float his boat. But rock n’ roll and the Beatles were a dream come true.

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In his recently-published book, The Cutting Edge: The Story of the Beatles’ Hairdresser Who Defined An Era, Cavendish (who is pictured below, strumming the Gretsch guitar John Lennon used during the recording of Paperback Writer), lifts the lid not just on Beatlemania, but also on popular culture in an era when the BBC only played “safe and proper” music by artists speaking “the Queen’s equerry”.

Source: By Alex Galbinski/



They have been madly in love for more than a decade. And keeping the romance alive, 75-year-old Paul McCartney enjoyed an intimate lunch with Nancy Shevel, 58, on Tuesday in Beverly Hills.

The casually-clad rocker shielded his eyes with a pair of sunglasses as he made a low-key exit from the eatery ahead of his wife.Read more:The casually-clad rocker shielded his eyes with a pair of sunglasses as he made a low-key exit from the eatery ahead of his wife. Meanwhile, Nancy cut a casual figure in a dark hoodie and cut-off trousers which she teamed with trainers for their afternoon date. The wife of the musician displayed her natural age-defying beauty when she scraped her brunette tresses into a bun and shielded her eyes with sunglasses.

Source: Daily Mail




As we've pointed out (over and over and over again), George Harrison and Eric Clapton continued to work together long after those mythic days of "Sour Milk Sea," "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" and "Badge." This is especially true of the early Seventies and the late Eighties, when Clapton appeared on Harrison's Cloud Nine (1987) and Harrison appeared on Clapton's Journeyman (1989). When the pair toured Japan together in 1991, Harrison's set was packed with a crowd-pleasing assortment of Beatles tunes (it was the first time Harrison had performed Beatles songs in Japan since 1966). Among the highlights each night was "Taxman," which originally appeared on the Beatles' Revolver (1966), and which the Beatles never performed live. Above, you can watch Harrison and Clapton tackle the classic Harrison-penned tune.  If you like what you hear, track down the double album recorded during this tour, 1992's Live in Japan. It features live versions of other Beatles tunes, including "Piggies," "I Want to Tell You," "Old Brown Shoe," "If I Needed Someone," "Something" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps."

Source: Guitar World