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Beatles News

Pattie Boyd has spoken about her life with George Harrison during her debut at International Beatleweek. The model and photographer was interviewed by Beatles expert Mark Lewisohn in front of a packed ballroom at the Adelphi.

It was her second visit to Liverpool in just over a week, after she attended Cilla Black’s funeral in Woolton. And she spoke of the day, saying “I thought I was going to weep like mad, but it was so wonderful and brilliantly done....I’m sure Cilla would have been really pleased.”

The 71-year-old was a teenage model in London when she first met Beatle George Harrison on the set of A Hard Day’s Night in 1964.

She says: “I got a call from my agent to go for an interview. The usual girls were all there waiting to go in and show their photographs. “I recognised Dick Lester, as I’d done some TV commercials for him, and I went away thinking it was an interview for a commercial.“I was shocked and amazed when my agent called and said I’d got a part in a Beatles’ film.”

Some scenes were shot on a train running to the West Country and back, and Boyd revealed how at the end of the day’s filming George Harrison details

Take one part R&B, one part Buddy Holly, and another part Everly Brothers and the result is “Thank You Girl,” the B-side to the 1963 single “From Me to You.” Ringo Starr’s pounding drumming, John Lennon’s bluesy harmonica, and Lennon and Paul McCartney’s tight harmonies make for an unfairly unappreciated early track.

Originally intended as an A-side, “Thank You Girl” was eventually replaced with “From Me to You.” Drawing from past interviews, Anthology quoted Lennon’s summary of the song’s fate: “We’d already written ‘Thank You Girl’ as the follow-up to ‘Please Please Me.’ This new number [‘From Me To You’] was to be the b-side. We were so pleased with it, we knew we just had to make it the a-side, Thank You Girl the b.” As Lennon stated in one of his last interviews, “‘Thank You Girl’ was one of our efforts at writing a single that didn’t work.”

According to the Beatles Bible, the song was a true collaboration between Lennon and McCartney, with the former writing the verses while the latter contributed the chorus and middle eight. Paul McCarney cla details

The Beatles were constantly photographed by professionals and obsessive fans alike, but they liked to take their own snapshots, too.

Drummer Ringo Starr especially loved taking photos.

During the group's glory days, Starr was active behind the lens, capturing candid moments on tour, backstage, and in the studio.

His work has been catalogued in a new book, "Photograph," which contains over 250 extremely rare and never-before-seen photographs taken by the world-famous drummer.

Published by Genesis Publications, the book will go on sale September 21.“There’s a lot of pictures in this book, shots of ‘the boys’ that only I could have taken," says Starr in the introduction.

Take a peek at the highlights below, as well as some of Starr's musings from the book.

Starr says he feels bad for famous young musicians of this generation who can't escape the media and society completely. "We'd go on holiday and it was great; we could go away, have a good time, and be left alone," he says. 

Soon after that photo was taken, Starr joined The Beatles. As the band's popularity grew, their days became busy with making music, going to photo shoots, and touring. Here, details

The 50 Best Beatles Songs - Saturday, August 29, 2015

The Fab Four. The Lads from Liverpool. The Mop Tops. No band has quite impacted the trajectory of popular music like John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr did in The Beatles. They’ve earned more No. 1 records than any other group in their native England, and sold more records than any other musician in America. They are indisputably one of the greatest acts of all time.

But picking the best 50 songs out of the 300+ The Beatles recorded was a project Paste has planned for more than a year. More than 20 staff members, contributors and interns participated, voting for 98 different songs—nearly a third of the band’s brilliant catalog. And the results are fascinating. We included 26 McCartney songs, 17 Lennon songs, three Harrison songs (two of which made the top 10), and four that were truly co-written by Lennon and McCartney. Below, find our thoughts on the 50 best songs by The Beatles.

50. “The Long And Winding Road”

“The Long and Winding Road” begins quietly, but after those first five words when the strings swell up, it gets dramatic pretty quickly. This symphonic track triggers a deep sense of longing and always invokes a sort of empty fee details

What was your first concert? Was it so seminal that 50 years later rock writers seek you out to pick through your memories? Personally, I know that will never happen to me: mine was Grand Funk Railroad with opening act Suzi Quatro at Madison Square Garden in 1974. But for a very lucky batch of teenage girls – and a smattering of boys, parents and celebrities – it was The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl in August 1965.

Following up on their groundbreaking 1964 sold-out concert at the Bowl, The Beatles returned for two performances the following year, August 29th and 30th. Tickets were $3, $4, $5, $6 and $7. Naturally, both shows sold out and with a capacity of just over 17,600, the band grossed $156,000 (almost $1.2 million in today’s dollars).

Back then, kids learned about and bought tickets through what today we call “traditional media.” AM radio station KRLA presented the concerts and promoters placed full-page ads in the Los Angeles Times, with a coupon that fans had to mail in on a specific date to order tickets.

And mail in they did. Fan and Beatles at the Bowl concertgoer Sharon Weisz remembers, “My parents didn’t subscribe to the Times so I had to go out and details

“Why does Pete Best still not know why he was fired from The Beatles?” Good question. (OK, it’s a bit “old school” before there was any school but again it beats answering those questions odd intimate inquiries. Seriously? We thought “The Walrus” was Paul. If you don’t get that reference then you need to look into a “Glass Onion”, mmmkay?) 

Former Beatles drummer Pete best still does not know why he was fired? Really?

It was August, 1960. A Brit band called The Silver Beatles recruited Pete Best as drummer. Guest speaker Mark Frauenfelder, contributor to BoingBoing, confirms this and adds: “Best was already in a band called the Black Jacks, but he took the gig and for the next two years he played with the band (which eventually dropped “Silver” from its name).”

In the summer of 1962 the band attended their first Parlophone recording session at EMI studios, (now Abbey Road Studios). They recorded four songs including the first recording of “Love Me Do.” Numerous sources note producer George Martin—not present during the actual recordings—later decided to use another drummer in the studio.  details

Liverpool’s tourism businesses have enjoyed as much as 15% annual growth in Beatles-related trade every year since 2008.

That claim was made by one of the local entrepreneurs behind the on-going International Beatleweek festival and comes as the city prepares for this weekend’s separate Liverpool International Music Festival (LIMF). The continuing surge of interest in The Beatles has meant that Cavern Club owner Cavern City Tours has seen its turnover double in the past seven years and this year’s figure is expected to reach £6m with profits in excess of £1m. As well as the Cavern Club venue and International Beatleweek, the company also operates the Magical Mystery Tours around Liverpool.

Cavern City Tours co-owner, Bill Heckle, told ECHO Business: “We have had 15% growth since 2008 and we thought it couldn’t get any better, but it is. “This last week was as busy as Beatleweek ever was. The number of visitors to the city is continuing to rise.”

International Beatleweek runs between August 26 to September 1 and involves live gigs, talks, exhibitions, memorabilia sales and tours. It culminates this coming weekend when thousands of tourists are expected details

Paul McCartney has admitted he was scared there was a Beatles serial killer on the loose following John Lennon’s assassination.

Speaking with Uncut magazine, Macca recalled his mindset in 1980 when he found himself the inadvertent subject of a mock invasion in his Scottish home.

“It was weird because in the days that followed it, I was sitting in the house. We had a little perimeter fence, mainly to keep foxes out, because we had some chickens. I’m aware of security threats, so I’m on high alert and I look out and I see someone with a f–king gun, like a machine gun, an assault rifle – ‘Wha?!’ He’s in full military gear, and then I see there’s a whole patrol of them. I’m going, ‘Holy shit, what’s going on?'” he told the British music magazine.

Fearing for his life, not to mention the Paul is Dead headlines the following day, the “Helter Skelter” singer worried he’d never see another day: “I don’t know what I did. I think I rang the police. It turned out to be army manoeuvres. [They said] ‘Oh, sorry. Are these your woods?’ I’d put two and two together and made a thousand. God, details

In the sad sweepstakes for Worst Paul McCartney Solo Album, it would have taken a lot to zoom past the cutesy London Town, the self-conscious Driving Rain or the undercooked Wild Life — to say nothing of the synthy disaster that is McCartney II.

Paul McCartney got there with Press to Play, released on Aug. 25, 1986, an oh-so-typically-1980s Hugh Padgham-helmed “event” that stands as perhaps his least listenable offering. In some respects, you can blame the production values. Listen closely, and you might find the first frail flowerings of a creative rebound for Paul McCartney here — even if the old-man attitude seems a little heavy handed on tracks like “Angry.” But, more often, you’re stuck with things like “Good Times Coming/Feel the Sun,” which was as lightweight as anything on the second side of Wings albums like London Town and, maybe more particularly, Red Rose Speedway — since it too featured a series of half-finished ideas masquerading as a medley. “Talk More Talk” and “Pretty Little Head” are, even now, largely nonsensical.

Yet McCartney is, bless him, incapable of making a completely awful record. (Even McCartney II had details

It’S been called his finest moment since his work with Thomas The Tank Engine. Ringo Starr is back in the nation’s living rooms as the star of a new advertising campaign for… comfortable shoes. “Rock out in comfort” may be the kind of tagline that would have horrified the four lads who stormed the Cavern Club in 1960s Liverpool but at 75 it seems the former Beatle is perfectly happy endorsing a gentler kind of existence.

In the commercials for Skechers shoes Ringo is back behind his drum kit, hammering out a beat, before watching a young pretender attempt the same. After the final flourish the old master shakes his head. “Well,” he says in that famous Scouse drawl, “at least you got the shoes right, brother.”

As adverts go it’s actually rather good. Ringo looks great: fit, handsome and still retaining that deadpan charm that always made him the funniest and most likeable of the Fab Four. And Skechers are clearly delighted. “We are incredibly excited to be working with such an amazing world-renowned artist as Ringo Starr,” the company’s president Michael Greenberg said in a statement. “Ringo possesses charm, charisma and global r details

Blame it on the bottle, Harry Nilsson makes another phenomenal attempt to dismantle his own career. It had all been eccentric career moves and nonstop partying since “Without You” stunned the world and made him a star back in 1972. Bringing along ex-beatles John and Ringo (sometimes George and Paul stopped by as well) and a trail of thirsty celebrities (like Keith Moon) as cheerleaders, wasn’t the smartest thing to do, at least according to his doctor and his record company. RCA probably thought their star had gone insane. I don’t think “Son Of Dracula” (1974) is Mariah Carey’s favorite album (or movie), to put it that way.

“Pussy Cats” was born during John Lennon’s 18-month “lost weekend” in Los Angeles. Out on his own he turned into your drinking buddy from hell, having a lot of catching up to do. John and Harry triggered each other in their drunken stupors, feeding the gossip press with marvelous scandals. In between fistfights, heckling and being thrown out of night cubs with a sanitary pad on his head, John offered to produce Harry’s next album. Not surprisingly it turned into an open doors session, party time, drinks and drugs and a gall details

Rare Beatles memorabilia will be auctioned off in Liverpool this weekend – including sketches drawn by Paul McCartney which are expected to fetch over £10,000.

The drawings, which include Beatlesesque faces drawn in ink, have writing by Paul on the reverse and were discovered by the seller in an attic.

More than 300 lots are being auctioned at the Annual Beatles Memorabilia Auction, including Beatles trading cards, Beatles breakfast bowls, a Christmas card signed by Yoko Ono and an 800-piece jigsaw puzzle.

Four volumes of the Liverpool Daily Post and ECHO from 1962-64 are also included in the sale, for a guide price of £250-300. The auction will be held at the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts on Saturday and is organised by Stephen Bailey, manager of The Beatles Shop in Mathew Street. He told the ECHO the sketches were “an amazing find”.

He said: “People usually think of John as the artistic Beatle but these drawings show Paul’s talent for capturing an image in a quick sketch. “Every year we’re just amazed by what goes in for auction and each year there’s something new that we’re surprised to see – it’s just fant details

The piano played by John Lennon during his last years in New York is currently making its way to Liverpool. It is expected to be put on display to the public at The Beatle’s Story museum in the city’s Albert Dock in time for the forthcoming Bank Holiday weekend’s music festivals.

The piano was used to record some of the last music John Lennon composed before he died at the hands of a gunman on December 8, 1980. According to Jack Douglas, an engineer who worked at the Record Plant Studio in New York at the time, it affectionately became known as “the John Lennon Piano” because he would move it to every studio he was working in. Lennon is said to have loved the piano’s honky tonk sound as it reminded him of early American Rock and Rhythm & Blues.

Originally a traditional upright made by the New England Piano company, it had been converted by inserting tacks into the hammers to give it a harpsichord-like percussive sound.

Not only can the piano be heard on Walls and Bridges and Double Fantasy but John Lennon also used it to compose songs with Elton John and David Bowie.

On the day he died, John Lennon spent many hours working at the piano on Walking On Thin Ic details

The Beatles' 10 Greatest Guitar Moments - Wednesday, August 26, 2015

The Beatles were such talented songwriters that it’s easy to overlook the fact that their music has some great—and occasionally groundbreaking—guitar work.

With that in mind, Guitar World decided to celebrate the 10 best guitar moments from the band's hit-making history. In assembling this list, we looked beyond our personal favorite songs and reflected on where John Lennon, George Harrison and Paul McCartney showed their talents as guitarists, whether in a solo, a riff, a technique or by their astute selection of instrument and arrangement.

For some songs, we’ve gone a step further and analyzed the guitar work to give you insights into the magic that makes these moments so special. Enjoy! And be sure to share your thoughts in the comments below or on Facebook! If you'd like to delve much more deeply into this topic, be sure to check out The Fab 50: The Beatles' 50 Greatest Guitar Moments.

10. “Something” Abbey Road (1969) Ironically, while the Beatles were breaking apart in 1969, George Harrison was coming into his own as a songwriter and guitarist.

His Abbey Road contribution “Something” is among his finest songs, and his guitar playing here and t details

Four new statues of the Beatles are to be erected in Liverpool. The Cavern Club is paying £200,000 for the 8ft tall bronzes of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr and donating them to the city of their birth. They hope they will be installed on Liverpool’s iconic waterfront.

People will get the first glimpse of the statues, sculpted by Andrew Edwards, on Sunday at the annual International Beatleweek convention at the Adelphi hotel. Two – Lennon and McCartney – have already been cast, and the other two are currently modelled in resin and clay. The Cavern’s Bill Heckle said today: “When we saw them for the first time it was really emotional – I thought I was going to cry. “We just shook our heads. We knew it would be good, but not as good as that.”

There are nearly 30 Beatles statues and monuments all over the globe, from Spain to Cuba, and Ukraine to Kazakhstan. Houston in Texas has a set which are 36ft tall.

Jon Keats, from the Cavern, added: “We want this to be the ultimate Beatles statue, here in Liverpool.” Claire McColgan, Liverpool’s head of culture, said: “Hats off to the Cavern. They’ve all details

Fresh off an undeniably historic headline performance at this year's Lollapalooza hailed without exception as the biggest and best in the festival's 25 year history, Paul McCartney has confirmed another new North American arena date on the universally acclaimed Out There tour.

Paul will return to Columbus, OH nearly 10 years to the day since his last appearance in the Ohio capital city to headline the Nationwide Arena on October 13. October 17 will see Paul back at Toronto's Air Canada Centre for the first time since 2010 on the Up And Coming Tour.

NEW NORTH AMERICAN DATES CONFIRMED

October 13 - Columbus, Ohio - Nationwide Arena

October 17 - Toronto, Canada - Air Canada Centre

Having already torn through 22 shows this year covering Japan, South Korea, Europe, the UK and the US, the Out There tour, as always, features music from the most beloved catalog in popular music, spanning Paul's entire career - as a solo artist, member of Wings and of course as a Beatle. The set list also includes material from Paul's most recent studio album NEW, a global hit upon its release in 2013.

The McCartney live experience is a once in a lifetime opportunity: in just three hours some of the greates details

If he was an ordinary musician without the famous last name, the assortment of music projects keeping Sean Lennon busy right now (producer, band member, solo artist, environmental activist) might cry out creative restlessness or workaholic.

He’s co-produced the forthcoming album by Fat White Family, and he’s also working with members of the group on a side project, a new act called the Moonlandingz who have an EP out in October. It’s released on his label Chimera Music, a label started by Lennon and his girlfriend Charlotte Kemp Muhl, and he’ll head into the studio next month to help produce and play on a Moonlandingz record, with an EP planned for October.

Meanwhile, Lennon has also started writing new music for his and Muhl’s band (they play together under the moniker The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger), in addition to new songs for himself – a batch of tunes that, once he’s ready to put them out, will comprise his first solo album in almost a decade. As if that’s not enough, he’s collaborating with his mother Yoko Ono on a new album she’s releasing in January. Oh, and he’s directing a documentary spotlighting some of his friends who work as artis details

Paul McCartney has admitted that he feared for his own life after John Lennon was killed. The former Beatle said he was on "high alert" when Mark Chapman gunned down Lennon outside his New York home in 1980, but said his own house in rural south England was still largely unprotected and in a remote woodland location.

McCartney said he was left terrified days after the killing when he spotted several armed men advancing on the property.

McCartney told Uncut: "It was weird because in the days that followed it, I was sitting in the house. We had a little perimeter fence, mainly to keep foxes out, because we had some chickens. I'm aware of security threats, so I'm on high alert and I look out and I see someone with a fucking gun, like a machine gun, an assault rifle – 'Wha?!' He's in full military gear, and then I see there's a whole patrol of them. I'm going, 'Holy shit, what's going on?'." 

He added: "I don't know what I did. I think I rang the police. It turned out to be army manoeuvres. [They said] 'Oh, sorry. Are these your woods?' I'd put two and two together and made a thousand. God, I don't know how I lived through it. You think you'd just faint dead on the ground. But they were all t details

It was the high summer of love, and the Beatles had just returned from an abortive trip to Greece in search of an island on which they could all live together and build a recording studio; it was John’s idea, but it quickly proved to be honey pie in the sky and they all gradually began to drift home.

Ringo had left early as Maureen was due to have a baby, George and Pattie flew home on 29 July 1967 to prepare to fly to Los Angeles.

Arriving in Los Angeles on 1 August, George rented a house on Blue Jay Way and while he was waiting for Derek Taylor, the Beatles former PR man who had moved to California where he set up his own PR business, to arrive, having got lost in the fog, George wrote a song named after the street, which was included on the Magical Mystery Tour album.

Over the next week George spent time at Ravi Shankar’s Music School, attended his musical mentor’s concert at Hollywood Bowl, and went to a Mamas and the Papas recording session before flying to San Francisco and walking around Haight-Ashbury, which was the centre of the counterculture and Hippies. before flying home to London on 9 August.

Two days after George arrived home, the Beatles were photographed by Rich details

Just two years separated Paul McCartney's second and third solo albums, 1980's McCartney II and 1982's Tug of War, but a lot changed for the ex-Beatle during that time. Two months after he reunited with Beatles producer George Martin in October of 1980 to begin recording Tug of War — which comes out as a deluxe CD/DVD reissue on October 2nd, along with its 1983 companion album, Pipes of Peace — John Lennon was shot and killed, and McCartney and Martin put their work on hold. They reconvened after a two-month break, bringing in high-profile guests such as Stevie Wonder (who would duet with McCartney on two songs, including future Number One "Ebony and Ivory") and Carl Perkins. Wings guitarist Denny Laine was on board as well, but he would announce his split from Wings in April, 1981, effectively ending that band.

Despite all the turmoil, Tug of War would turn out to be a major success, going platinum and spawning two Top 10 hits. We're offering an exclusive premiere of a remastered single edit of one of those songs, "Take It Away," a version that won't be among the many bonus tracks featured on the Tug of War reissue.

The new reissues are the latest volumes in the Paul McCartney Archive Collection, a details

The Mathew Street Festival may be no more, but International Beatleweek continues. And thousands of Fab Four fans and band from all over the world are set to descend on Liverpool this week to celebrate all things John, Paul, George and Ringo.

They will be joined by some of the most important people in the Beatles’ story, with the city alive with music and talks from Wednesday onwards. The annual week-long event is organised by the Cavern.

Here are 10 events and people that you shouldn’t miss.

1. Anniversary Concert- Cavern Club, August 27 from 6pm.

Join Hal Bruce and a host of the best Beatles’ tribute acts for this anniversary concert in the Cavern’s Live Lounge from 6pm to 2am. A Cavern Club all day and night tickets, which also gives you access to 14 hours of music, noon to 2am, in the front room of the Mathew Street venue, costs £10.

2. Donovan- Royal Court Theatre, August 28 at 7.30pm. Adelphi Ballroom, August 30 at 3pm.

The legendary troubadour that is Donovan returns to Liverpool to take part in International Beatleweek and celebrate 50 years in the music business. He’s due to play a special Shram-Rock Concert at the Royal Court details

SOME TWO YEARS ago, David Gilmour very kindly sent MOJO a cover version of The Beatles’ Here, There And Everywhere.

We enjoyed his reworking of the Fab Four so much that we wanted to share it and after a spot of cajoling he’s finally agreed to let us include it on free CD that comes with the new edition of MOJO (October 15 / #263), on sale from Tuesday, August 25.

“I really wish I had been in The Beatles,” Gilmour tells MOJO of the genesis behind his cover. “[They] taught me how to play guitar, I learnt everything. The bass parts, the lead, the rhythm, everything. They were fantastic.”

That love is manifested on the wonderful harmony-filled cover of the 1966 Revolver original recorded with his son Joe. Previously unreleased anywhere, it forms the cornerstone of our collection of music designed to celebrate the Pink Floyd leader’s life, work and influence, David Gilmour & Friends.

A number of Gilmour’s closest collaborators appear on our bespoke compilation while the guitarist is featured on six of the tracks himself, including songs from Phil Manzanera, Robert Wyatt and The Pretty Things.

The CD is accompanied by a major new interview wi details

If only, even for one day, you could blink yourself back in time — to when you felt freest, when you felt boldest, when the sheer power of youth made you certain you'd succeed

. More than half a century ago, as the Beatles took the world by storm, a group of teenage girls made a pact. They would find a way to meet their idols, face to face, when the band arrived in L.A.

Who cared that theirs was a dream shared by a million screaming, bawling fans? These girls didn't cry. They plotted and succeeded, pulling off a caper so audacious that Life magazine pinpointed it as the moment when "Beatlemania reached its apogee."

Who wouldn't want to try to relive that glory?

And so even though one of their crew, Sue Candiotti, said she couldn't make it, Paula (Glosser) McNair, 67, flew in from Salt Lake City, and Californians Kay (Zar) Crow, 66, and Michele "Mikki" Tummino, 67, made their way south, determined to recapture the thrill of their wild quest.

Crow remembers its start, lying in her bedroom in 1964, listening to her little gray Zenith transistor radio, hearing "I wanna hold your hand..." In seconds, the Hamilton High 15-year-old was dialing a friend on her turquoise Princess phone, conv details

Much of what the average rock aficionado knows about the break up of the Beatles comes from either Jann Wenner’s interviews with John Lennon or from casual attention during those years to news reports about the legal hassles the Fabs endured while extricating themselves from their partnership in Apple. Like any break up, personal or professional, (and this was both the severing of an indescribably successful musical collaboration and the splintering of friends who’d been almost inseparable since childhood), the Beatles’ demise was messy and hurtful for all involved.

Tom Doyle’s superb book Man on the Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970’s fell into my hands as a birthday present from my beloved sister a few days ago and I dropped my usual reading to devour it, both because I wanted to make sure my sister knew I appreciated her thoughtfulness and because I will read anything written with something approaching competence about The Beatles generally and Paul McCartney specifically. Hell, I even read the incompetent stuff.

This book is as good as any I’ve ever read on these subjects. Kudos to Tom Doyle and to my sister Janis.

Doyle is a good journalist as well as a good writer details

The Beatles Symposium returns with a powerful lineup of experts on the Fab Four, according to organizers of the Beatles at the Ridge Festival. The symposium helps kick off the annual music festival in downtown Walnut Ridge Sept. 18-19.

Among the highlights at this year’s symposium will be an on-air presentation from Beatles experts Richard Buskin and Robert Rodriguez. They produce a popular podcast, “Things We Said Today,” which they will do live at the symposium.

Another recent addition is vendor Bud Loveall, who is bringing his Beatles Shop from Austin, Texas. Loveall is noted for his supply of Beatles memorabilia, T-shirts, books and other items.

Symposium headliners include Ivor Davis, who traveled with the Beatles on their North American tour in 1964, and Seth Swirsky, the filmmaker who created the movie “Beatles Stories.”

Davis was the only journalist to join the Beatles for all 34 days of their first American tour, and he was also the only newspaper writer invited to accompany the Beatles for the “Rock and Roll Summit,” when the band finally met Elvis Presley in Los Angeles in 1965.

In 2014, Davis broke his long silence and shared the &ldqu details

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