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Sir Paul McCartney has opened up about the first time he met Beatles bandmate John Lennon, admitting he looks back “like a fan”.

The 78-year-old singer spoke to Lennon’s son Sean Ono Lennon, 44, and widow Yoko Ono, 87, for new BBC Radio 2 documentary John Lennon At 80.

McCartney recounted the day on 6 July, 1957, when he was introduced to Lennon, then aged 16, in Liverpool.

He said: “I look back on it now like a fan, how lucky was I to meet this strange teddy boy off the bus, who played music like I did and we get together and boy, we complemented each other!”

Sir Paul McCartney admitted not all the songs he wrote with John Lennon were good.

Source: news.yahoo.com

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The Roncalli Auction has always been entertaining, and this year will be no different! Roncalli Catholic Schools is pleased to share the 36th Annual Roncalli Pierside Auction will go on online and with a special virtual event.

“There is nothing like the energy of the auction, and we will do our best to deliver on the fun everyone knows and loves,” said Candice Giesen, director of development for Roncalli Catholic Schools. “While we are moving online this year, we are still planning to bring the fun and hopeful that we will return to the gym and an in-person event in the future. Over 200 items are available for bidding!”

Registration is now open at www.roncalliauction.givesmart.com. Silent auction items are, as of Monday, available for viewing and bidding. Premium auction items will be available for viewing and bidding beginning Wednesday. Premium auction items will include one-of-a-kind finds such as a Paul McCartney signed electric guitar, Pop*A*Card pinball machine and Rowe AMI Jukebox.

Source: htrnews.com

 

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Even 50 years after their separation, The Beatles continue to make headlines. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison will be at the heart of a new book in which they recall the recording of their last original album, “Let It Be”. On the program: long hours in the recording studio, friction and lots of rock ‘n’ roll.

“The Beatles: Get Back” is a 240-page account of the creation and recording of the band’s 12th album, “Let It Be”, which many fans believe contributed to the split of the British band in 1970.

This is an erroneous view of The Beatles’ history according to English writer Hanif Kureishi, who wrote the introduction to “The Beatles: Get Back”.

“In fact this was a productive time for them, when they created some of their best work. And it is here that we have the privilege of witnessing their early drafts, the mistakes, the drift and digressions, the boredom, the excitement, joyous jamming and sudden breakthroughs that led to the work we now know and admire,” wrote Kureishi in the introduction.

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When The Beatles met Elvis Presley in 1965, the Fab Four wasn’t impressed with the King’s current output. John Lennon and Paul McCartney both said they thought Elvis’ best work came before he served in the Army in the late ’50s.

In 1980, while giving his Playboy interviews, John narrowed down the premier Elvis period for him. “When I was 16, Elvis was what was happening,” he said. “A guy with long hair wiggling his ass and singing ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘That’s All Right’ and those great early Sun records, which I think are his great period.”

In ’66, as the band set to record Revolver, The Beatles actually considered going to Memphis (home to Sun Studio) to lay down tracks for the album. However, after manager Brian Epstein looked into the matter, the band decided against it. Apparently, it came down to money, and Paul believed the decision had an impact on the quality of three Revolver tracks.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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A new peace award named in honor of Yoko Ono will be presented during a virtual gala to be held by The Peace Studio, an organization co-founded by President Barack Obama's sister Maya Soetoro to promote "active peacebuilding" through artists and storytellers. The Dalai Lama, Ted Danson and Rhiannon Giddens will be in attendance.

"I am thrilled to have The Peace Studio inaugurate the Yoko Ono Imagine Peace Award. I look forward to working with The Peace Studio to honor deserving recipients as they further the causes of peace and justice that have been central to my life's work," Yoko Ono said, in a statement provided to Newsweek by The Peace Studio. "I wish you well with the gala and your work in spreading the message of peace, which is needed now more than ever."

Source: Andrew Whalen/newsweek.com

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Lennon and McCartney sneaked in Liverpool slang or even made up new words or phrases for their songs, Paul McCartney says in a new interview on his official website.

"There was a thing in Liverpool that us kids used to do, which was instead of saying 'f-off', we would say ‘chicka ferdy’, McCartney said.

"It actually exists in the lyrics of The Beatles song Sun King. In that song we just kind of made up things, and we were all in on the joke. We were thinking that nobody would know what it meant, and most people would think, ‘Oh, it must be Spanish,’ or something. But, we got a little seditious word in there!"
"When you are kids you make up silly things, and what’s great about it is you and your friends all know those silly things," recalled the once and forever Beatle.

Source: rte.ie

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In the 1970 film Performance, a gangster on the lam named Chas (James Fox) has a hilarious encounter with Turner, a reclusive rock star played by Mick Jagger. “You’re a comical little geezer,” Chas tells Turner. “You’ll look funny when you’re 50.” The line gets funnier every year, and Paul McCartney probably laughs about it as hard as anyone.

Long before the music became “classic rock” and The Beatles made massive arena shows the norm, Paul and other musicians of the day couldn’t have imagined selling out packed American stadiums one night after the next. For starters, they didn’t know how long their fans would listen.

In late 1966, just after the Fab Four stopped touring, Paul checked in with The Beatles Book Monthly fanzine for a chat about the state of things. On the subject of touring, Paul sounded as if he agreed with Chas in Performance. He thought The Beatles would look silly if they were still flogging it on tour a decade later.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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October 9, 2020 marks what would have been John Lennon’s 80th birthday. It also sadly marks four decades since he’s been gone.

That it’s been that long is hard to believe. But what is undeniable is that the power of his music hasn’t diminished at all. The music, the spirit, and the message conveyed means more now than ever.

To celebrate this milestone, a new collection called John Lennon Gimme Some Truth is being released, featuring new “ultimate” mixes of many of his most famous solo work done by Paul Hicks. These are completely new mixes done from scratch, but with much care and focus on fidelity to John’s vision.

“Yoko is very keen,” said Hicks, “that in making The Ultimate Mixes series we achieve three things: remain faithful and respectful to the originals, ensure that the sound is generally sonically clearer overall, and increase the clarity of John’s vocals. ‘It’s about John,’ she says. And she is right. His voice brings the biggest emotional impact to the songs.”

Source: Paul Zollo/americansongwriter.com

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In many ways, the end of The Beatles was a liberating moment for George Harrison. After years of having his bandmates reject his songs and Paul McCartney telling him what to play (or not play) on guitar, George could make his solo record exactly as he saw fit.

That’s exactly what George did with All Things Must Pass (1970), the triple album that served as the epic opening statement of his solo career. Over six album sides, the erstwhile “Quiet Beatle” rattled off one sparkling composition after another. (The set included a bitter farewell to the Fab Four.)

But George, a well-known perfectionist, didn’t love how every track turned out in the studio. He had legendary producer Phil Spector at the controls for All Things Must Pass, and Spector had his ways.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon has a blissful autumn day in Central Park in the video for “Mind Games,” off his upcoming box set Gimme Some Truth. The Ultimate Mixes.

The video — now upgraded to HD — was shot in November 1974, a year after he released the album by the same name. Wearing a slick black coat and a floppy hat to match, he strolls through Strawberry Fields and signs autographs for fans. He glances at ice cream and pretzels at a food cart before he feeds elephants at the Central Park Zoo and dances at the Naumburg Bandshell to an empty audience. Later, he visits Tiffany & Co., pays a visit to the marquee of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road and rides away in a horse-drawn carriage.

“[Mind Games] was a fun track because the voice is in stereo and the seeming orchestra on it is just me playing three notes with slide guitar,” the late Beatle said in an interview. “And the middle eight is reggae. Trying again to explain to American musicians what reggae was in 1973 was pretty hard, but it’s basically a reggae middle eight if you listen to it.”

Source: Angie Martoccio /msn.com

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Who Wrote the Most Beatles Songs? - Friday, September 18, 2020

John Lennon was the dominant early creative force in the Beatles. But Paul McCartney quickly began to catch up as their career together unfolded. George Harrison made a late push into songwriting as well.

So, who wrote the most Beatles songs?

As you'll see, there are individual albums where Lennon and McCartney take center stage. Lennon, for instance, wrote or co-wrote an astonishing 10 songs for 1964's A Hard Days Night. On the other hand, McCartney is credited for the vast majority of 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

On several occasions, things were in complete equilibrium: 1965's Help! and Rubber Soul, and 1966's Revolver. They basically split the songwriting difference on 1968's The Beatles, too. But there was clearly a sense of competition about things: Lennon would write "Day Tripper" and McCartney delivered "We Can Work It Out"; Lennon brought in "Strawberry Fields Forever," and McCartney countered with "Penny Lane."

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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The Beatles had extremely dedicated and excitable fans back in the 60s. At each gig a large group of teenage girl fans fought their way into the press conferences held just before the band went on stage, in an effort to catch a glimpse of the fab four.

September 18, 1964 was no different, as John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr all arrived at the Dallas Memorial Auditorium.

A group of young women attended the press-only press conference to try and talk to the band.

But the real story begins just after this, as the band were heading to the auditorium's stage.

The stage itself was three times larger than the normal height for standard concerts for The Beatles, giving them quite a view over the 10,000 fans that had come to see them.

Source:Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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John Lennon has sometimes been blamed for the break-up of The Beatles, given he brought Yoko Ono on the scene. Her involvement in the band caused obvious tensions, and many blamed her and her relationship with John for the band’s demise. However, different members of the band left at different times and returned, showing it can’t all be John’s fault.
Why did John Lennon leave The Beatles?

On September 20, 1969, the members of The Beatles met up for a meeting, though George Harrison was not present.

During this meeting, John announced he was leaving The Beatles, much to the dismay of Sir Ringo Starr and Sir Paul McCartney.

However, according to John, things went sour soon after as ‘PR man’ Sir Paul announced his departure first, despite John reportedly promising to keep his exit quiet to help with promotion of The Beatles.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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The Britbox streaming network has acquired the North American rights to air Lennon’s Last Weekend, a new documentary focusing on the final interview John Lennon gave before his December 1980 murder, Deadline reports.

The hourlong special profiles a conversation that the late Beatles legend had with BBC radio DJ Andy Peebles on December 7, 1980, one day before Lennon was shot to death outside of his New York City apartment building. The film will premiere this December in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of Lennon’s passing.

Source: ABC News/1065thearch.com

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Dave Meister certainly could claim to be speaking words of wisdom as his plans for a British-themed pub and eatery called Let It Be unfold in the months ahead.

After all, the music lover with an artistic touch is no stranger to the influence of the Beatles, having already once recreated a replica of the Liverpool, England, underground music venue where the group drew crowds in its early years.

That version of the Cavern Club, which was brought to life in Meister's Hartland office building and private jazz studio in 2018, attracted some high-profile interest from its onset.

This time, it's different. Meister wants to generate a true live-music venue in downtown Waukesha that would do the British Invasion proud, to the delight of fans of all ages locally. It won't be bigger than the Beatles, but as Let It Be takes shape, piece by piece, before it opens in the summer of 2021, he admits to having high enough hopes to become, at minimum, a downtown centerpiece.

Source: jsonline.com

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The Beatles aren’t exactly a well-kept secret. You could ask anyone, and even if they don’t claim to be a huge fan of the band, they’ll certainly know who The Beatles are and will likely have a song or two they enjoy.

The Beatles have been labelled as the most influential band of all time, and you’d be hard-pressed to find someone who disagrees with that.

However, a more debatable topic would be that of their discography.

People always seem to have differing opinions on the best and the worst.

Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Todd Pfannestiel, among many others, rates The Magical Mystery Tour as his least favorite Beatles album relative to all the others. However, this is not to say he doesn’t still enjoy it though.

Source: uctangerine.com

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Fifty-six years ago, the Beatles tried to sneak into town. Their private jet landed in the dead of night in a bid to escape the crowds. It didn’t work. They were met by a mob of shrieking teens who chased after rock’s mop-haired darlings as they left Friendship Airport (now BWI Marshall) in a limousine, flanked by 22 police cars. A caravan of fans followed them downtown at speeds of up to 80 mph while leaning out their windows shouting those iconic lyrics from “She Loves You” (Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!).

On Sept. 13, 1964, as part of their first official North American tour, the Beatles played Baltimore. The city had seen nothing like it. The English rockers packed the Civic Center for two Sunday shows, drawing 13,000 convulsive fans for each performance. (That same afternoon the Orioles, who led the American League pennant race, drew 3,035 for a game at Memorial Stadium.)

Source: Mike Klingaman/baltimoresun.com

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The first official Beatles book since seminal Anthology in 2000 is to be published in August 2021.

The Beatles: Get Back will tell the story of the final Beatles album, Let It Be, drawn from over 120 hours of transcribed conversations from the band’s studio sessions. It will accompany Peter Jackson’s feature documentary of the same name, also set for release that month.

The book documents January 1969, with friction building in the band as they recorded music for an intended TV special – George Harrison walked out of the sessions at one point and John Lennon described them as “hell”. The music they made, though, would be among the most poignant in their catalogue, and the sessions built towards the group’s final live performance, on top of the Apple Corps building in London on 30 January 1969.

Source: Ben Beaumont-Thomas/msn.com

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The Beatles legend George Harrison became an honorary member of Monty Python after the Beatles split, according to Terry Gilliam.

George, who died in 2001, struck up an unlikely friendship with the trailblazing British comedy troupe, made up of Terry, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Michael Palin, Graham Chapman and Terry Jones, and even bankrolled their most famous film, 1979’s Life of Brian.

‘He was a joy,’ Terry told Metro.co.uk.

‘With George, he’s always referred to as the “quiet Beatle” – not at all! Just a jabber mouth. He was incredibly funny, that’s the other side that people aren’t aware of. They go “ohhh spiritual”. No, he was incredibly funny and we just had a great time.

Source: Darryl Hannah Baker/metro.co.uk

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Ringo Starr rescheduled his 2020 tour dates with his All Starr Band to summer 2021 as the COVID-19 pandemic has kept music venues closed.“This is very difficult for me,” said Starr in a statement on his website, “in 30 years I think I’ve only missed 2 or 3 gigs nevermind a whole tour. But this is how things are for all of us now, I have to stay in just like you have to stay in, and we all know it’s the peace and loving thing we do for each other. So we have moved the Spring tour to 2021. My fans know I love them, and I love to play for them and I can’t wait to see you all as soon as possible. In the meantime stay safe. Peace and Love to you all.”

Source: Marie Fiero/uinterview.com

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When Paul McCartney came up with the Beatles classic “Yesterday,” he played it for as many people as he could.

It wasn't because he was looking for criticism, but because he wanted to know if people recognized it. He was concerned that, instead of having written it himself, he’d accidentally stolen it from someone else.

Famously, McCartney dreamed the melody, then woke up and rushed to his bedroom piano to figure it out. “For about a month I went round to people in the music business and asked them whether they had ever heard it before,” he said later. “Eventually it became like handing something in to the police. I thought if no one claimed it after a few weeks then I could have it.”

Source:ultimateclassicrock.com

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A legendary The Beatles member and also one of the best friends of the late legend John Lennon, Ringo Starr, took to his official Twitter page today and sent his regards to Lennon by using beautiful words.

While Ringo sending peace and love to John, he also admitted that he’s still missing his old friend and while sending his message, he did not hesitate to mention Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon, who is the son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

If John Lennon would be alive, he would be 80-years-old today. While many people, even today, think that Ringo Starr isn’t talented, John Lennon was allegedly told Ringo was the best drummer in the world.

Let’s hear what Ringo Starr said about John:

Source: Enes K./metalheadzone.com

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The Beatles was a band which dominated the music scene all over the world in the 1960s. The band had a name which was known by young women everywhere, especially during Beatlemania. But how did the band find their name, and what exactly is it?

There has been a great deal of discussion about whether the Beatles is The Beatles, or purely Beatles.

The group have named themselves The Beatles on a number of their album covers, however the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band simply reads ‘Beatles’ on the grassy knoll in front of the band.

This has served as quite the confusion for some fans, who are unclear as to what the band should actually be.

According to various sources, many of whom have credentials surrounding their command of grammar, the band’s name is The Beatles, as, when referring to the band, both words should be capitalised, therefore the band is The Beatles.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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The Beatles were around for a long time, and their presence in the world was overtly complex. While there were of course other bands around at the time, none were as stratospherically popular as them, which meant everybody wanted a piece of the fab four. This meant a lot of groupies surrounded the band on their travels.

Over the course of the years the band shacked up in a number of hotels and private venues whilst on the road.

But when their popularity began catapulting in the earlier years, John Lennon brought along his wife, Cynthia Lennon.

Cynthia, who was born September 10, 1939, was happy to accompany her husband on tour, as it had been one of the first times she took a trip to the U.S.A.

Of course, eventually it would come to pass that John marriage with Cynthia would eventually break down once Yoko Ono was in the picture - but until then, Cynthia was extremely supportive of her husband's endeavours.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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The Beatles worked hard to craft their sound over the years, and fans of the band have since fallen in love with the various nuances through each of their albums. Over the years the band created many albums with hugely different styles and themes. The White Album is perhaps one of the most popular albums the band made, as it includes many enormous hits for the band.

Crucially, however, it includes While My Guitar Gently Weeps.

The songs is an emotional display of George Harrison's feelings, and divulges some of his best songwriting of all time.

Despite these facts, the young star struggled to get his band to record it with him.

Speaking out about this experience in Anthology, he explained how he instead turned to pal Eric Clapton when Paul McCartney and John Lennon wouldn't help him out.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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