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On Feb. 23, 1965, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr began filming the second Beatles movie. Originally named Eight Arms to Hold You -- an innocent but prophetic phrase that was definitely better than the working title Beatles 2 -- the title was eventually changed to Help! And that's exactly what the band needed around that time.

The four knew their fabness was waning. Beatlemania was taking its toll, making it impossible for them to escape the bubble of fame that surrounded them, leaving the quartet detached from the kind of everyday world that inspired the songs that helped blow up that bubble in the first place.

Lennon knew what he was doing when he wrote the title track. “I meant it, it’s real,” he said later. “It was just me singing ‘help’ and I meant it.” Separately, he told Playboy in 1980 that, at the time, he “was fat and depressed, and I was crying out for help.”

McCartney more recently concurred: “He didn't say, 'I'm now fat and I'm feeling miserable.' He said, 'When I was younger, so much younger than today.' In other words, he blustered his way through. We all felt the same way.” Still, “Help!&r details

The official and verified Instagram page of The Beatles icon John Lennon exposed special memorabilia of lithographic plates written by Lennon.

In the caption of the picture, It is stated that this exclusive plate was written by John in February 1969 as a part of the ‘Bag One’ collection. The stone was printed by Curwen Studio in London, and also it’s signed and dated.

Here is what John Lennon wrote onto the stone:

“THIS IS MY STORY, 1969⠀

Source: Berk Uykucuoglu/metalheadzone.com

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Software entrepreneur and music producer Scott Freiman put together a little show for friends in his living room in Irvington, New York, back in 2009, listening to some Beatles music. He’d been a fan of their work since childhood and enjoyed analyzing what made it so unique.

Before he was finished, his friends — composers and producers — were suggesting he was on to something. They told him he ought to develop his ideas into presentations others could enjoy as well. His background was perfect: an undergrad degree from Yale in computer science and music, and a master’s from New York University in music composition. He’d been in the business full time since 2001, opening his own studio in 2005, writing film scores, editing movie sound and music, and selling out Carnegie Hall with a concert of original music for orchestra and children’s choir.

Source: Joe Stinnett/newsadvance.com

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The Day John Lennon Came To Michigan - Saturday, February 22, 2020

That December day in 1971 when John Lennon came to Ann Arbor was his own idea…he wasn’t invited, but took it upon himself to come and perform.

The reason? John had heard about the plight of John Sinclair. Sinclair was chairman of the Rainbow People’s Party of Ann Arbor and was serving an unjust ten years in Jackson State Prison for possession of two marijuana joints. The People’s Party did their best to bring attention to their cause by holding concerts, benefits, and rallies, and they even got a handful of celebrities involved, like actor Donald Sutherland, Jane Fonda, and others. After Yippie activist Jerry Rubin told Lennon about an upcoming December 10 rally for Sinclair, Lennon took the ball and ran. He wrote a song about Sinclair that can be found on his Sometime in New York City album.

The rally was to be held at UM’s Crisler Arena, and Lennon said he would donate his performance fee to the John Sinclair Freedom Fund.

Source: 99wfmk.com

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James Taylor is one of the most iconic folk singers of the 1960s, which is saying a lot. Although the Beatles occasionally dabbled in folk music, they largely stayed in a separate musical lane from Taylor. However, that doesn’t mean he didn’t socially interact with the Beatles now and then.

In fact, Taylor auditioned for the Beatles. Later, Taylor had a front-row seat to the later years of the Beatles. Surprisingly, he admitted to being a bad influence on the group.

Rolling Stone reports Taylor was signed to the Beatles’ Apple Records in 1968. He was able to secure an audition for the label after his friend gave his demo tape to Apple’s head of A&R, Peter Asher. On a 2015 episode of Late Night with Seth Meyers, Taylor said scoring the audition was a great example of “being in the right place at the right time.”

Taylor was told he was going to audition for two Beatles an hour before the audition was going to happen. He recalled auditioning for Paul McCartney and George Harrison and being thoroughly intimidated by the experience, as most musicians would be. At the audition, he played “Something in the Way She Moves,” which was his favorite of the songs he details

Just days before his death, The Beatles founding member George Harrison wrote a letter to Austin Powers director Mike Myers expressing his admiration for his work.

The letter, which would go on record as the final note ever written by ‘The Quiet Beatle’, was never mailed out to Myers but was subsequently passed on to the filmmaker who, coincidentally, ended up receiving on the day Harrison passed away.

Myers, whose father was born in Liverpool, once said: “You don’t know what The Beatles were in my house,” in an interview with WENN news. “They were everything. Liverpool was poorish and it was rough and all of a sudden it was cool to come from this town, so my parents were eternally grateful.” 

Later, in a wide-ranging interview with GQ, Myers was asked: ‘Is it really true that the very last letter George Harrison wrote in his life was to you?’ and, remarkably, it was: “Yes. That’s mind-blowing, dude, for the son of a Liverpudlian, a person who worships the Beatles,” Myers replied.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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The National Trust is looking for a guide to work at the childhood homes of Paul McCartney and John Lennon.

The "once in a lifetime opportunity" has become available due to a long-serving member of staff retiring.

The Beatles composed and rehearsed many of their early hits at the houses in Liverpool.

The charity said it wanted someone with "accurate historical knowledge" to bring the "early years of two of the Beatles' story to life".

Paul McCartney lived at 20 Forthlin in Allerton from the age of 13 to 22 and about 100 Beatles songs were composed there.

Lennon lived at Mendips, a 1930s semi-detached house in Woolton, with his Aunt Mimi from the age of five to 22.

Source: bbc.com

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If you were looking for experimental music from The Beatles, you’d probably look to John Lennon first. After all, Lennon was behind the sound collage that was “Revolution 9” and another wild song the band rejected during the White Album (1968) sessions.

But Paul McCartney had gotten out in front of John in this regard. When Paul led the band through the free-form “Carnival of Light” in ’67, he’d long been experimenting with avant-garde music. (According to Ian MacDonald, Paul worked on tape loops and musique concrete as early as ’65.)

By the time The Beatles got near the end of the line, Paul felt ready to bring “prepared piano” to a Fab Four track. In this case, it involved altering strings to get a metallic effect. When George Harrison asked for a different piano sound on “For You Blue,” Paul got to work.

 

Source: Cheatsheet

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The Beatles: Paul McCartney says John Lennon split the group

John Lennon and Paul McCartney were incredible songwriters and their joint powers created some of the best songs in the world. But they also had some pretty nasty things to say about each other, which they certainly didn’t shy from in their songs. But what happened between the pair of them, and did they patch things up?

John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote many of the Beatles biggest hits together.

Lennon and McCartney met at a local church fete in 1957, where Lennon was performing with a skiffle group called the Quarrymen.

After Macca impressed Lennon with his guitar stylings, he was invited to join the Quarrymen, and soon they brought along their friends to listen to their new song performances, inviting mates such as Nigel Walley and future Beatle George Harrison.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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Between summer 1968 and January ’69, relations between The Beatles hit an all-time low. During the making of the White Album, Ringo Starr registered his personal disgust with the situation by walking out on the band for a few weeks (in August ’68).

That left the group without a drummer, which led the remaining three to try their hand at the kit on “Back in the U.S.S.R.” Though Ringo returned before long, that set a precedent. Later in the White Album sessions, Paul McCartney played drums on “Mother Nature’s Son” even though Ringo was in the studio that day.

The following year, Paul was back on drums for a May ’69 single. On the A-side, listeners heard “The Ballad of John and Yoko,” John Lennon’s No. 1 hit. For its B-side, fans got the George Harrison track, “Old Brown Shoe.” In this case, Paul played drums on both because Ringo was on a film shoot.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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On his first trip to England in 1968, James Taylor played for Paul McCartney and George Harrison. The younger half of the Beatles were impressed with the Chapel Hill-raised singer-songwriter, and they made Taylor the first act signed to the nascent Apple Records. Taylor began recording his debut album at Trident Studios, where the Beatles were also recording The Beatles at the time.

“We intersected in the studio a lot,” says Taylor in a new interview in the Guardian. “They were leaving as I was coming in. I often came in early and would sit in the control room and listen to them recording – and hear playbacks of what they had just cut.”

It’s hard to imagine what more a barely 20-year-old musician could want, but it wasn’t all good news for Taylor. He quickly picked up a drug habit in London, where heroin and other opiates were cheap and easy to find at the time.

“[Y]ou used to be able to buy something called Collis Browne’s Chlorodyne, which was an old-fashioned medication. Essentially, it was a tincture of opium, so you’d drink a couple of bottles and you could take the edge off,” he recalled. Eventually, he shared his stash with none oth details

In 1961, The Shirelles made history when “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” topped the Billboard Hot 100. It was the first time a black girl-group — any girl-group, some say — ever hit No. 1 on the leading U.S. pop chart.

When record-buyers took that single home, they found another gem on the B-side. That was “Boys,” a track Luther Dixon and Wes Farrell had written for the group of young ladies from New Jersey. Over in England, a Liverpool band called The Beatles started performing it live in their performances.

Though this early version of The Beatles featured John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison, the vocal duties on “Boys” went to drummer Pete Best. Across town, playing for Rory Storm and The Hurricanes, drummer Ringo Starr also sang the song.

So when Ringo joined The Beatles in ’62, he kept running with the vocal whenever the band played “Boys.” And it never seemed to matter that the lyrics spoke of “boys — what a bundle of joy.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ever since the Beatles broke up, fans wished they would reunite. That sort of happened in the years following John Lennon’s death. Here’s how an unfinished demo by John led to a musical reunion for the Beatles.

Ultimate Classic Rock reported that, in 1977, John recorded a demo song called “Free as a Bird” for the musical The Ballad of John and Yoko. He never finished it and he died in 1980. According to The Beatles Bible, George Harrison approached Yoko Ono to see if he and the other surviving Beatles could work on some of John’s demos together. In 1994, Yoko would give Paul McCartney tapes containing four unreleased John tracks: “Free as a Bird,” “Grow Old with Me,” “Real Love,” and “Now and Then.”

Paul was moved listening to them. He said “I’d never heard them before but she explained that they’re quite well known to Lennon fans as bootlegs. I said to Yoko, ‘Don’t impose too many conditions on us, it’s really difficult to do this, spiritually.’”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Most Influential Songs of The Beatles - Monday, February 17, 2020

The song "I Want to Hold Your Hand" is so incredibly simple lyrically. But when The Beatles released this song and showed how they could take a song about two lovers holding hands and make it into something special, the world definitely listened.

The upbeat music and beats mixed with a fun and energetic chorus were extremely contagious, and had fans everywhere singing along. This was only emphasized by when they performed the song live on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964.
One of the most popular song written and sang by John Lennon was "Norwegian Wood" on the album Rubber Soul. This song had an almost folk-like sound to it all while telling a very intriguing story about John Lennon visiting a friend of his and staying the night.

Source: Alex Parisi/theblast.com

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When The Beatles bought the possibility carry out on the 1967 Our World broadcast, they weren’t significantly excited. Despite the very fact it might attain a whole bunch of tens of millions internationally, John Lennon waited till simply earlier than the occasion to write down the tune they’d carry out.

But John got here up with a winner (“All You Need Is Love”), and to make issues extra fascinating he determined he’d sing it stay for the June ’67 broadcast. That gave the Beatles’ manufacturing crew nervous suits.

After John determined he’d sing stay, Paul McCartney mentioned he’d do the identical together with

his bass half. Once Paul was in, they turned to George Harrison to see if he’d play the guitar solo stay as properly. George agreed.

Source: Jeremy Spirogis/sahiwal.tv

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If you wanted obscure lyrics, the 1967 work of John Lennon will do. Start with the “looking-glass ties” and “marmalade skies” on “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.” As John said of a different Beatles song from that year, “Stick a few images together, thread them together, and you call it poetry.”

He was speaking about “I Am the Walrus,” a track that took obscure lyrics to another level. Yet on tracks like “All You Need Is Love,” his message couldn’t be clearer. A few years later, John was singing in the most direct way possible on “Don’t Let Me Down” and “I Want You.”

On his first solo album (1970), he dispensed with images entirely, and fans got more of the same on 1971’s Imagine. (“The only thing you done was ‘Yesterday,'” he sang of Paul McCartney.) But Mind Games (1973) found John back to writing at least somewhat obscurely.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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In the autumn months of 1969, Paul McCartney died.

It had been a series of deaths, really. First up were the rumors, invented and spread by DJs and college students, that he had perished in a 1966, automobile accident and that the other Beatles were accomplices in the coverup. The Paul Is Dead hoax would be quelled after Life magazine dispatched a crew to Scotland to track down McCartney. The world breathed a sigh of relief after Life ran a November cover story under the banner headline "Paul Is Still with Us" and a glossy photo of the living, breathing Beatle with his young family.

But during that same period, he had also suffered a spiritual death of sorts with the Beatles' disbandment. For McCartney, the idea of no longer being in the group meant that his creative outlet had seemingly been extinguished. By his reasoning, the "overall feeling" during his downtrodden days in Scotland was that "it was good while I was in the Beatles, I was useful, and I could play bass for their songs, I could write songs for them to sing and for me to sing, and we could make records of them. But the minute I wasn't with the Beatles anymore, it became really very difficult."

Source: salon.com

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KARW was a radio station in Tyler-Longview, Texas. The station broadcasted at 1280 kHz AM for 46 years, ending in 1994. In 1966, the “Beatles Bonfire” was an event that was both retrospectively comical, or extremely disrespectful, depending on how religious or into the Beatles you claim to be.It all started in the fall of 1996. The culprit? John Lennon. It was all due to an offhanded comment in an interview with Maureen Cleave with the London Evening Standard. In the interview in early August, John Lennon stated that his band, The Beatles, was more popular than Jesus Christ. Which, depending on who you ask, the fab four just might have been. Women were screaming, swooning, and passing out at shows, Beatles albums were being printed and sold at lightning speeds, and rock and roll was being changed forever. The comment was printed in Datebook, an American teen magazine and that’s when all hell broke loose. Because the only thing that can rival Jesus’ fandom is a boyband. Most people read the article and just dismissed it as pop music babble.

Source:  Moriah Gill, Writer/rare.us

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here were five months between the announcement and the release of Green Day’s new album, Father of All…, and even though it’s the band’s 13th studio LP, frontman Billie Joe Armstrong admits he still gets nervous with anticipation.

“I have a hard time sleeping and I try to distract myself as much as I can,” he told DK of ALT 105.3 in San Francisco.

There was nothing to worry about, of course, now that we know that the concise 10-song, 26-minute ‘60s pop-inspired album to be another win for Green Day.

But a social media question from a listener brought Billie Joe back to another moment when he had to catch his breath. A fan wanted to know the last person to make him starstruck. The year was 2015 and it involved the surviving Beatles.

“When we got inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Ringo (Starr) was doing a sound check and we’re standing next to Paul McCartney’s bass amp and he was relearning how to play the bassline to ‘(With) a Little Help From My Friends,’” Armstrong recalled. “And I just sort of looked over at Mike (Dirnt) and I was like ‘I can’t even believe what is happening right n details

When Beatles manager Brian Epstein secured the Fab Four’s spot on the 1967 Our World broadcast, he considered it a major coup for his group. “I have the most fantastic news to report,” Epstein told the band before making his announcement. But none of The Beatles seemed to care.

At the time, the group was finishing up Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and couldn’t be bothered. Though Our World eventually reached hundreds of millions via satellite, it appeared to be just another appearance to four guys who’d made it their mission to stop touring a year earlier.

Nonetheless, John Lennon volunteered to write a song for the broadcast, which would feature the band performing live in Abbey Road studios. And, as they’d done when recording the orchestra part for “A Day in the Life,” The Beatles decided to make it a happening.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Lennon was officially still a Beatles member when he performed his hit single on BBC.

In 1970 John Lennon becomes the first solo Beatle to appear on Top Of The Pops when he performs his single “Instant Karma!”

Released while John Lennon was still officially a member of The Beatles, on February 6, 1970, “Instant Karma!” was written, recorded and released within a period of ten days, making it one of the fastest-released songs in pop music history. The recording was produced by Phil Spector, marking a comeback for the American producer after his self-imposed retirement in 1966, and leading to him being offered the producer’s role on the 1970 Beatles’ “Let It Be” album. Having privately announced his departure from The Beatles in September 1969, he was now comfortable to issue “Instant Karma!” immediately as a single, the third under his and Ono’s Plastic Ono Band moniker.

Source: popexpresso.com

 

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The contribution to music from John Lennon and Paul McCartney can never be truly overstated. The partnership spawned some of the world’s most cherished songs and later emboldened the pair to seek solo careers. But what was the final song the pair truly wrote alongside one another?

‘Lennon & McCartney’ is a marking so ubiquitous on the back of The Beatles’ first records that you would expect the Fab Four to be a duo. While George Harrison and Ringo Starr’s own proficiency with a pen grew with time, for a short while all the songs were either Paul’s or John’s.

During the band’s frenzied early moments, attached to one another by the almighty touring schedule, Lennon and McCartney created songs side by side. They worked on melodies together, they exchanged lyrical ideas, they harmonised on vocals and either played piano or guitar for one another. But soon enough that naturally came to an end.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles, the new work by Kenneth Womack, dean of humanities and social sciences at Monmouth University, and veteran Beatles historian, is essentially two books. The first half is a fascinating look at the Fab Four’s swan song, whether you’re a general Beatles fan, a musician, someone fascinated by the record production process, or all of the above. The second half is a much darker look at the world’s most influential musical act of the 1960s imploding. While Beatles obsessives like myself know the tale of how Abbey Road was written and produced fairly well, Womack manages to uncover several surprising details.

Source: By Ed Driscoll /pjmedia.com

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What John Lennon Hated About the British Press - Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Imagine, if you can, a storied British institution under siege. After years of joy and prosperity, the institution faces a challenge from an outsider — a foreigner — with the potential to topple the colossus.

That might sound like the saga of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry in recent years, but it’s only the latest example. Fifty years earlier, John Lennon and his soon-to-be wife Yoko Ono dealt with a similar reaction from the British tabloid press during the latter days of The Beatles.

After a couple years of that treatment, John and Yoko did what they had to do — they left England for good. If you read what John said about the British press, it isn’t hard to see how he came to that decision.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Bob Dylan. The Cure. Alice Cooper. Roger Daltrey. Brian Wilson. Def Leppard, Dr John. Kiss. Chrissie Hynde. Jeff Lynne. Heart. Steve Miller. Perry Farrell. Robin Zander & Rick Nielsen. Sammy Hagar. Paul Rodgers.

There are tribute albums and then there are tribute albums. The Art Of McCartney, a tribute to former Beatle Paul McCartney, is one of the latter, with a cast of performers that reads like a "who's who" of A-list rock stardom.

Launched in 2014, the super-deluxe version of the album (triple CD, quadruple coloured vinyl, DVD, 64-page 12” hardback book, etc) originally retailed at £240, but right now it's on sale for less than £90 at Amazon.

Source: By Scott Munro/loudersound.com

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