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Beatles News

The legendary “fifth Beatle” died two years ago after a lifetime as a successful record producer.

And now a new biography is claiming Martin had a “cold war” with The Beatles in 1968 when they recorded The White Album.

Author Kenneth Womack details the affair in his new book, Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin, the Later Years, 1966-2016.

The Guardian reveals the claim is that Martin would turn up to recording sessions and just sit reading newspaper and eating chocolate.

Womack alleged: “I asked them [the sound engineers] what George was doing when John was playing a particularly guitar part or when Ringo was working on some drum part.

“They would say ‘nothing, he was in the back of the booth, reading newspapers, sharing his chocolate with us.’

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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A handwritten letter from John Lennon’s Aunt, Mimi Smith, which dates from September 1967 and refers to The Beatles visit to Bangor, is set to be auctioned next weekend.

The Beatles visited Bangor on 25th August 1967 to attend a conference at the Normal College, now the University’s Management Centre, led by Maharishi Yogi, a guru in Transcendental Meditation.

The visit to Bangor however was tragically cut short, after the group heard the news on Sunday 27th August, that their manager Brian Epstein had died age 32, following an overdose of sleeping pills.

Source: thebangoraye.com

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He was the producer often referred to as the fifth Beatle. But George Martin was “frozen out” by the band while they were making the White Album in 1968, a new biography claims.

Its author, Kenneth Womack, said that a “cold war” between Martin and the band led to him turning up to those recording sessions with “a large stack of newspapers and a giant bar of chocolate” – only to sit at the back of the control booth reading and eating. Martin had produced Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, one of many landmarks of music that he oversaw, but he would speak “only if he was called on by the Beatles” while they made the White Album.

Source: Dalya Alberge/theguardian.com

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Thirty years ago, an album called The Traveling Wilburys appeared and quickly went platinum. It had four famous singer-songwriters and one famous producer-musician performing under stage names. It was the work of George Harrison. The actual story of the Wilburys album captures what can happen when a group of talented artists gathers, often by chance, at a certain time when everything is right, the stars are lined up, and the creativity is focused.

In April 1988, Harrison needed to record a B-side for a European single. There was a deadline issue and Harrison asked Bob Dylan for the use of his Malibu studio. Tom Petty and Roy Orbison joined them, and with Dylan cooking barbecue, Harrison instructed the musicians, including producer Jeff Lynne, to make up words to his chords.

Source: Michael Corrigan/idahostatejournal.com

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“Yesterday” was, in effect, the first solo record from a Beatle. Paul McCartney famously wrote the song’s melody while asleep, hearing it in a dream. He held onto it for weeks, convinced that he’d been thinking of some nagging previously existing melody. He sang it for people, asking them whether they knew what song it was. Nobody knew, so McCartney finally decided, rightly, that it was his. (Not that the Beatles were ever that shy about swiping musical ideas.)

McCartney kept tinkering with “Yesterday” on the set of the Beatles’ movie Help!, reportedly aggravating both director Richard Lester, who threatened to take away his piano, and the rest of the band. He kept working on the words, too. For a while, the song’s working title, as a sort of private in-joke, was “Scrambled Eggs.” When McCartney did figure it out, when he recorded it, he was the only Beatle to do so.

Source: Tom Breihan/stereogum.com

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Why Nobody Sang the Beatles Like Aretha - Saturday, August 18, 2018

From singing “Eleanor Rigby” in the first person to why “The Long and Winding Road” is the best Beatles cover of all time
Aretha Franklin’s genius took so many forms — as a singer, a songwriter, an album-crafter, a live performer. But the Queen was also one of history’s most audacious Beatle fans. Nobody ever sang the Beatles like Aretha. Since she was one of the few Sixties musicians as famous and revered as they were, she felt free to take any approach she pleased to a Fabs song — sometimes radically reworking it, as when she sang “Eleanor Rigby” in the first person. When Aretha sang any song, even a Beatle song, she claimed it as her own — and the Beatles knew it. Nothing could make them prouder than getting one of their songs stolen by the Queen. When Paul McCartney wrote “Let It Be,” he sent an acetate demo to Aretha in hopes she’d record it, knowing full well she’d outsing him on it. (Needless to say, she did.)

Source: Rob Sheffield/rollingstone.com

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The two surviving Beatles paid tribute to Aretha Franklin today following the news of the Queen of Soul’s death. Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr issued separate statements, each praising the artist for her musical impact.

“Let’s all take a moment to give thanks for the beautiful life of Aretha Franklin, the Queen of our souls, who inspired us all for many, many years,” McCartney wrote, paired with a photo that was shot looking up at her as if in awe. “She will be missed but the memory of her greatness as a musician and a fine human being will live with us forever. Love Paul.”

Starr simply wrote, “God bless Aretha Franklin the queen of soul and peace and love to her family.” He accompanied the note with emojis for music, peace and love.

Source: Kory Grow/rollingstone.com

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Macca's first studio album in five years is out next month

Paul McCartney has shared a new single from his forthcoming album ‘Egypt Station’, and revealed the full tracklisting for the record.
You can watch the lyric video for the single ‘Fuh You’ below. It’s the third track to be revealed from the album, following ‘I Don’t Know’ and ‘Come On To Me’ which both appeared together in June.

he latest single finds the former Beatle exploring a contemporary pop sound, and is a change in direction from the relatively traditional-sounding tracks we’ve heard thus far.

The album’s full tracklisting has also appeared, with Macca tweeting an individual illustration for each track, or ‘station’ in a thread you can see below.

That tracklist in full:

Source: Patrick Clarke/nme.com

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It was 56 years ago today ...

Ringo Starr on Wednesday celebrated the anniversary of the fateful day he joined the Beatles — replacing their original drummer and giving the world the Fab Four.

"56 years ago today John, Paul and George invited me to become part of the Beatles. It was a great day for me! peace and love," Starr, 78, wrote on his Facebook and Twitter pages, followed by a string of emojis.

56 years ago Wednesday, 15 August John Paul and George invited me to become part of the Beatles it was a great day for me peace and love. 😎✌️🌟💖🤓😏🤨

His post came one day after a Beatles reunion, of sorts, went viral: A side-by-side selfie of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's sons, who share a striking resemblance to their famous fathers.

Source: Jason Silverstein/cbsnews.com

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A restored and remixed version of John Lennon & Yoko Ono’s Imagine will reach theaters around the world beginning on Sept. 17.

The movie documents the making of the 1971 album Imagine and features never-before-seen footage.

According to a press release, Imagine, which Lennon and Ono directed, was restored frame-by-frame from the original reels, and the audio has been remixed by Paul Hicks. It guest stars Fred Astaire, Andy Warhol and Dick Cavett. The bonus footage, 15 minutes in all, includes Lennon and his band -- George Harrison, Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voorman and Alan White -- recording his anti-Paul McCartney diatribe "How Do You Sleep?" and "Oh My Love." A special Dolby Atmos "raw studio" mix was created for these performances.

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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Rishikesh:

Fifty years after the Beatles came to India, the bungalows where the Fab Four lived, the post office where John Lennon sent Yoko Ono postcards and the giggling guru's house are all ruins.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's ashram, where the world's most famous group sought refuge and spirituality in 1968 and wrote much of their seminal "White Album", fell into disuse in the early 2000s.

But thanks to the efforts of a group of locals, the site has been reclaimed from the jungle and tourists now roam where tigers and snakes were until recently the most common day trippers.

"Before, people used to sneak in, which could be dangerous," said local journalist Raju Gusain, instrumental in rescuing the area overlooking Rishikesh in northern India.

Source: All India | Agence France-Presse

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The Let It Be singer recently returned to the scene of the photo as he recorded his new album Egypt Station at the legendary London studio, and shared a video of himself crossing the road on Instagram, much to the delight of die-hard fans.

One fan described him as “the king”, while another wrote: “Paul Icon walking across Abbey Road this time wearing sandals, stops to give crowd a hello as only Paul McCartney can do.” (sic)

During the raw question and answer session the Liverpool-born star also revealed how the people and humour of his hometown in made him the man he is today and revealed his favourite memory of growing up in the Northern city.

Source: startsat60.com

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Two things symbolise the era of free love that was the 1960s – The Beatles and Alec Issigonis’ revolutionary Mini. Discovering a combination of the two is a seldom-found opportunity, but the very 1965 Morris Mini Cooper S DeVille used by Paul McCartney is going under the hammer with Worldwide Auctioneers during the 11th annual Auburn Auction held at the National Auto & Truck Museum, Illinois, on September 1.

Offering peppy performance from a 1275cc four-cylinder engine, mated with a four-speed manual gearbox and four-wheel hydraulic brakes, the heavily modified DeVille Cooper S isn’t quite the same machine as was immortalised by Paddy Hopkirk during the Monte Carlo Rally. Rather, the upmarket Mini was fitted with a host of custom interior and exterior touches, often to individual order.

Source: autoclassics.com

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DUBAI: Billionaire investors from Saudi Arabia are reportedly snapping up a slice of Europe — minutes from Dubai's coast — as development on a luxurious man-made archipelago gathers haste.

On the emirate’s “The World” archipelago, the Heart of Europe project is an island destination comprising a complex of opulent palaces, island villas and 13 luxury hotels stretching across six small islands. Each offer a different aspect of European life and aim to bring European hospitality “with a Maldivian twist” to the Middle East’s Arabian Sea.

And, according to its developer, Joseph Kleindienst, chairman of the Kleindienst Group, wealthy investors across the Kingdom are among the most prominent buyers of the multimillion-dirham properties that are being developed on the island, with nearly a quarter of all investments (23 per cent) to date being by Saudi nationals.

Source: arabnews.com

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BEATLEMANIA is set to take over Redditch later this month with a talk from Ringo Starr’s drum curator and friend, Gary Astridge.

Gary has spent decades researching, organising and restoring The Beatles’ existing drum kits for their iconic value and historical significance.

As a member of Ringo’s inner circle, Gary can offer residents an insight into the life of the band like few others can.

He has amassed a personal collection of vintage drum kits which were all used by Ringo during his musical career.

This includes Ringo’s first Ludwig drum kit which at one point was sold for an astonishing £2.1 million.

Gary also has an intimate understanding of the drumming techniques used by Ringo and will be sharing those with members of the audience.

Source: Harry Leach/redditchstandard.co.uk

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If you had a number one hit song, you would probably remember writing it. John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote over 200 songs together over 50 years ago. So it’s no surprise that memories have gotten a little fuzzy when it comes to who wrote which Beatles song.

Take for example, the song “In My Life.” John claimed to have written that track, but Paul remembers it differently.

The two Beatles agreed to disagree. But die-hard fans remained curious—was there a way to get closer to the truth? True Beatles fans will tell you they’re more partial to songs written by Paul or John.

Mark Glickman, senior lecturer in statistics at Harvard University, was one such curious fan. He developed an algorithm to determine the authorship of “In My Life” and several other contested Beatles songs, by identifying what makes a song a John song or a Paul song. He joins Ira to discuss solving the mysteries of musical authorship with statistics.

Source: sciencefriday.com

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You might think you reside in a sweet pad, but it pales in comparison to the banana-colored submersible that the mop-topped lads from Liverpool call home in the classic Beatles tune "Yellow Submarine." The whimsical ballad was written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, memorably sung by drummer Ringo Starr, and appeared on their 1966 album Revolver.

To capitalize on the song's fantasy narrative and immense popularity, an iconic animated feature was produced using a kaleidoscopic palette of vivid colors and crazy characters (like Blue Meanies, Apple Bonkers, Snapping Turks, Old Fred, and of course the Dreadful Flying Glove) in a trance-like odyssey starring John, Paul, George, and Ringo.

Source: Jeff Spry/syfy.com

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The man known as the Fifth Beatle was more than a musical genius integral to the success of the biggest-selling band in history - with more than 800 million records shifted - according to author Kenneth Womack’s new book Sound Pictures. Martin was also a cool entrepreneur who responded robustly to a cash crisis over studio rentals and possible bankruptcy. At various times, he rejected multi-million bids for his company and an offer by his former employer, EMI, which wanted him to return to a higher salaried job. Instead, Martin took an even larger risk, opening a new studio in the Caribbean.

Source: Mark Beech/forbes.com

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The Beatle was interviewed by Marc Maron for his "WTF" podcast and talked about fame, the Stones and Charles Manson.

Capitol Music Group hosted its fifth annual Capitol Congress today at Hollywood’s Arclight Theater. The day-long confab brings together employees from across Universal Music Group as well as some of the company’s top executives, chief among them: UMG chairman and CEO Lucian Grainge, who delivered introductory remarks this morning. The event has traditionally featured several top stars from the CMG roster, and this year was no different, only the bar was set even higher with an appearance by Paul McCartney.

The Beatles co-founder was presented with a special Capitol Icon Award by CMG chief Steve Barnett, who programmed the day’s sessions, performances and Q&As. McCartney was later interviewed by podcast host and “Glow” star Marc Maron, a talk that will make up an episode of his “WTF” show.

Source: Shirley Halperin/variety.com

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Researchers from Canada and the U.S. have used math to unravel one of the greatest musical mysteries of the modern era: Who wrote “In My Life,” a nostalgic rock ballad on the Beatles’ 1965 album “Rubber Soul.”

It’s a song both John Lennon and Paul McCartney have taken credit for, sparking an enduring debate on the authorship of the melody and chords.
This 1966 file photo shows The Beatles, from left, John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney and George Harrison as they leave London Airport on their trip to the U.S. and Canada. Researchers from Canada and the U.S. have used mathematics to unravel one of the greatest musical mysteries of modern era: Who wrote In My Life, a nostalgic rock ballad on the Beatles' 1965 album Rubber Soul.

Source: The Canadian Press/thestar.com

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CBS is expanding on its hugely popular “Carpool Karaoke” segment with Paul McCartney with a primetime special. The network has greenlighted Carpool Karaoke: When Corden Met McCartney Live From Liverpool to air Monday, August 20 at 8 PM.

The network says the hourlong special will feature never-before-seen footage from the “Paul McCartney Carpool Karaoke” segment which aired on The Late Late Show with James Corden on June 21, during the week of shows from Central Hall Westminster in London. During the “Carpool Karaoke” segment, Corden and McCartney drove around Liverpool, visited McCartney’s childhood home and several of the places referenced in the song “Penny Lane,” and surprised locals with an intimate performance at a pub.

Source: Denise Petski/deadline.com

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The Beatles played Dodger Stadium in 1966 — louder than the Blue Crew beating the Giants eight days a week; and the Fab Four played the Hollywood Bowl the two years before that – recurring opportunities for your grandmas to put the "mania" in Beatlemania, perhaps providing the inspiration for the "Scream" movies.

Bob Eubanks was to blame for bringing the Beatles to SoCal, and he just won't let it be. Now, he wants to tell us all about it. That Mop Top flashback moment, "Backstage with the Beatles," is coming to the Civic Arts Plaza in Thousand Oaks on Sunday. Eubanks will be himself and Ticket to Ride, will be the Beatles.

Source: Bill Locey, Special to Ventura County Star

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The Beatles Rap in New York - Wednesday, August 08, 2018

On August 22, 1966, the Beatles flew into New York and gave two press conferences at the Warwick Hotel on West 54th Street. Asked their opinions on the war in Vietnam, they were succinct, John Lennon saying, “We don’t like it,” and George Harrison adding, “War’s wrong and that’s all.”

When a reporter asked, “Would you care to elaborate?” Paul McCartney said, “We would elaborate, but not here. … In England people will listen a bit more to what you say. Here everything you say is picked up and turned against you. There’s more bigotry in America.” The Voice‘s reporter, James Kempton (son of the well-known commentator Murray), noted, “Every pencil in the room came down.” And that’s when the quick-thinking 24-year-old McCartney decided that it might, in fact, be a very good moment to elaborate: “There are more people so there are more bigots.”

Source: by Michael Musto/villagevoice.com

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The slain Beatle's wife has repeatedly said that Mark David Chapman should not be released after he shot the musician dead in New York City in 1980. YOKO Ono was the second wife of John Lennon and the couple campaigned for world peace together for years before he died.

Here's the lowdown on the Japanese artist who stole the heart of the Beatles' legend.
Yoko Ono was married to John Lennon for more than 10 years when he was shot and killed. Yoko Ono is 85-years old .

She was married to John Lennon for over ten years from 1969 to 1980 when he was murdered in Manhattan.

Together the couple had a son, Sean Ono Lennon, who was born in 1975.

John and Yoko met in London in 1966 and married three years later in 1969.

The Beatles broke up in 1970.

Source: By Guy Birchall/thesun.co.uk

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There’s a crazy rumour that’s persisted for over 50 years that Paul McCartney actually died in a car crash in 1966 and was replaced with a lookalike imposter.

It was so well-known that Life magazine referred to it in the title – Paul is still with us – of a 1969 cover story about the musician. McCartney himself referenced the ‘Paul is dead’ myth on his 1993 album Paul Is Live. He also parodied the iconic album art of Abbey Road, which conspiracy theorists alleged contained clues suggesting McCartney’s replacement with a dead ringer.

Source: Christian Blauvelt/bbc.com

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Beatles Radio Listener Poll
What will you call him?