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While The Beatles had several peaks together collectively, the band members didn’t always see it that way. Take Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which is often called the greatest album of all time. Neither George Harrison nor Ringo Starr had a great time making that record.

George described being bored by the “assembly process” the band went through during the Sgt. Pepper sessions. For his part, Ringo wasn’t thrilled about all the sitting-around the band did making the album. (He compared it to being a session musician.)

On “She’s Leaving Home,” Ringo didn’t even have a drum part to play. Overall, Sgt. Pepper was very much a Paul McCartney project. That hints at another reason Ringo didn’t enjoy making the album.

In an interview published in the Anthology project, Ringo said he generally preferred playing songs John Lennon wrote to those penned by Paul. It was a matter of the songwriters’ individual styles.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ringo, Paul, John — and Eric?! Perhaps no other band in history is quite as synonymous with the first names of its members as the Beatles. But at one point, George Harrison walked out on the band — and at the top of the list to replace him: Eric Clapton.

The guitarist first met the Fab Four when he was in the band the Yardbirds, who were a supporting act for one of their headlining shows in 1964.

That led to a connection so strong that straddled both the Beatles' professional and personal lives. Clapton didn’t just collaborate with the band as a whole, but he also played with each of the four members independently on their solo endeavors. On top of that, he became best friends with Harrison — and they even ended up sharing an ex-wife, Pattie Boyd.

Source: biography.com

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You’ll sometimes hear Beatles fans referring to a Fab Four record as “perfect.” Given the power of the songwriting, production, and individual performances, it’s not hard to understand what they mean. But from a technical standpoint, band’s recordings were far from perfect.

In some cases, The Beatles intentionally made a recording flawed. Geoff Emerick, the band’s longtime engineer, explained how it worked in the book Here, There and Everywhere. “When someone made a mistake and the others liked it, we’d often make it louder [during mixing] to accentuate it.”

On the Abbey Road album, you find an example of what Emerick was talking about on “Polythene Pam.” In the middle of that track, which was part of the Side Two medley, Paul McCartney made a mistake playing his bass part.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Collector guitars signed by rock and roll legends such as Eric Clapton and Van Halen were recently stolen from a storage unit in Daytona Beach.

“I hate thieves. They’re the worst on earth so I’m glad that he got caught and I’m excited about getting my guitar back,” Jack Baker said.

Jack Baker lives out of state and stored his precious memorabilia he bought online at the storage facility while he renovates his Florida home.

“Something in my brain told me that it would be better taking it to Hyde Park because it’s built like a fortress,” said Baker.

Officials from the Daytona Beach Police Department said the crime was reported on Dec. 20, 2019, after someone came to the unit at Hyde Park Storage Suites and noticed the eight instruments were missing. The crime likely occurred sometime between October and Dec. 17, 2019, but it’s unclear exactly when.

Source: Adrienne Cutway/clickorlando.com

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While George Harrison was working to refine his songwriting craft, he wasn’t getting much help from his bandmates in The Beatles. “I had a little encouragement from time to time, but it was very little,” George said in a 1977 interview.

Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick backs up that account in the book, Here, There and Everywhere. “In general, sessions where we did George Harrison songs were approached differently,” Emerick said. “Everybody would relax — there was a definite sense that it really didn’t matter.”

During the sessions for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), George faced more criticism than usual. It began when he introduced “Only a Northern Song” in the studio. After John Lennon didn’t play on the backing track, The Beatles decided to shelve the song for a later date.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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George and Ringo's Handwritten Lyrics - Saturday, January 11, 2020

There's a special piece of Beatles memorabilia up for sale ... handwritten lyrics to a classic song from the 'White Album' scribbled by George Harrison and Ringo Starr!!!

The lyrics to George's signature song "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" are penned on the back of a studio recording sheet, and it's going up for sale through the memorabilia company Moments in Time -- and they're hawking this slice of Beatles history for $195,000.

It's pretty cool ... the lyric sheet is a working draft used during the hit song's recording way back in 1968 at EMI Studios in London.

George started the top of the sheet by writing, "I Look at You all see the love there thats sleeping -- While my guitar gently weeps" and continued at the bottom with, "While my Guitar Gently weeps as I'm sitting here doing nothing but aging still my guitar G W."

All the writing in between is scribbled by Ringo ... including an effort to work out a misspelling on the side of the sheet.

Source: tmz.com

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The longtime friendship between Bob Dylan and The Beatles’ own George Harrison is a long one deeply entrenched in the joy of one another’s creativity. In fact, in 1992, Dylan would be the major reason for Harrison to perform for what would be one of the last times.

The legendary Quiet Beatle had been out from underneath the large shadow the Fab Four had cast for a few years now. His iconic album All Things Must Pass had ascertained Harrison his legendary status on his solo work alone but, despite all his experience, Harrison was never a big fan of touring after his 1974 tour.

The pain of that tour with Ravi Shankar had clearly landed quite heavily on Harrison and for many years, despite commercial success like his 1987 record Cloud Nine, the Quiet Beatle was, for the main part, remaining quiet.

Yet in 1990 something seemed to change, Harrison looked as if he gearing up for a tour of his own, for the first time since 1974. After sharing the stage in Los Angeles in 1990, Harrison, to seemingly dip his toe into the touring water, joined the legendary Eric Clapton for a joint tour of Japan, the next year.

Source: Jack Whatley/faroutmagazine.co.uk

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There are a lot of ‘almost’ moments in rock and roll history, one that has always hung heavily over our heads was the very real moment Saturday Night Live nearly reunited The Beatles, had John Lennon and Paul McCartney been bothered to get up from watching it on TV.

In the iconic first series of ‘Saturday Night Live’ – America’s home of alternative weekend hilarity – show’s legendary producer, Lorne Michaels set himself a fairly big challenge: to reunite The Beatles. He started as any SNL act would, with a piece direct to camera.

Whether Michaels was performing with the real intent of reuniting the most enigmatic songwriting partnership to have ever existed in Lennon and McCartney, or he was just doing a bit, he shared the sentiment of a nation. Michaels talks directly to the camera about how The Beatles had affected so many lives, “In my book, The Beatles are the best thing that ever happened to music. It goes even deeper than that — you’re not just a musical group, you’re a part of us. We grew up with you.”

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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The Beatles are some of the most widely discussed people of all time. It feels like every time John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr tied their shoes has been thoroughly documented. However, one Beatles song has remained hidden from the public for decades. Here’s what we know about the lost Beatles track “Carnival of Light.”

Of the Beatles, John is often regarded as the avant-gardist. Paul, meanwhile, is known for making more conventional music. However, The Guardian reports Paul tried his hand at experimental music with a song called “Carnival of Light.”

Barry Miles asked his friend Paul to compose music for an electronic music festival called the Million Volt Light and Sound Rave. The festival was held in 1967 at the Roundhouse Theatre in London. Little did Miles know Paul would produce one of the great pieces of rock esoterica.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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There have been some incredibly famous music stars over the years from Elvis Presley to Freddie Mercury. And, of course, surviving Beatles member Sir Paul McCartney has had to deal with the highs and lows of fame for almost 60 years. In a new interview, he revealed how he tries to put fans at ease when meeting him, but also revealed which musician he still gets nervous around himself.

Speaking with The Penguin Podcast last month, the 77-year-old said: “If I had to interview someone famous tomorrow, I’d be like thinking about it all night and all morning, ‘oh my god what am I gonna do?’

“And I imagine that’s what they’re going through and normally you can see this bit of fear in the eyes or there’s shaking.

“So I like to put people at ease and say, ‘Look, it doesn’t matter [about calling me Sir Paul], I’m just some guy.’

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

 

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The Beatles’ 1969 album Abbey Road has been named the US’s biggest-selling vinyl LP of the 2010s, shifting more than 558,000 copies. The Top 10, compiled by Nielsen Music, is comprised almost entirely of old albums, from Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon (2), Bob Marley and the Wailers’ Legend (4) and Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours (9).

The only 21st-century releases on the list are Amy Winehouse’s 2006 album Back to Black (5) and Lana Del Rey’s 2011 debut Born to Die (10), the only original album from the 2010s to chart. The soundtrack to Marvel’s first Guardians of the Galaxy film, released in 2014, placed third with 367,000 sales, but features solely music released between 1968 and 1979.

Expanded allegations of child sex abuse by Michael Jackson do not appear to have affected his sales: Thriller placed sixth, selling with more than 334,000 copies.

Abbey Road also topped vinyl sales for 2019 in the US, thanks to an elaborate box set reissue to mark its 50th anniversary.

Source: Laura Snapes/theguardian.com

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The Fab Four grew up in Liverpool together but had drastically different family lives. In an interview with The Penguin Podcast last month, Paul McCartney spoke of his comfortable upbringing compared to John Lennon’s. The Beatles star admitted: “I was very lucky. I had a very lovely family in Liverpool.”

The 77-year-old added: “And I can’t remember any aggro. I mean how lucky is that?

“I thought everyone had that kind of a family.”

However, it was when he met John Lennon that he discovered his future bandmate had a much harder time.

The young musician had lost his mother, while his father had left at a very early age.

Source: express.co.uk

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In 1965, The Beatles started on a new path. After racking up No. 1 hits with songs like “Love Me Do” and “She Loves You” in ’64, the Fab Four began digging deeper. John Lennon, resolving to turn the lens on himself, had his most introspective moment to that point with “Help.”

Though he charted a path in a different direction, Paul McCartney was also growing rapidly as a songwriter. After delivering the masterpiece “Yesterday,” he followed with more clever work like “Drive My Car” and “You Won’t See” me on Rubber Soul (released later in ’65).

By then, John was turning out classics like the sitar-infused “Norwegian Wood” as well as “Nowhere Man” and “Girl.” To George Harrison, the prospect of matching this work must have been daunting. He didn’t have someone to bounce ideas off of and had little experience writing on his own.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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One of the world’s most gifted songwriters of all time, Paul McCartney has been involved in some of the most popular and beloved music the modern world has ever known. But which one of The Beatles’ extensive back catalogue was his favourite?

In a recently unearthed interview, thanks to CBS, that question has now been answered. The star, usually very coy about picking his favourite songs, was talking to Scott Muni, a legendary broadcaster for WNEW in New York City, about his then-new song ‘We All Stand Together’ back in 1984.

The singer was promoting the track, which featured in the short animated film Rupert and the Frog Song and was credited to Paul McCartney And The Frog Chorus, when Muni hit him with the age-old question, what is your favourite Beatles song?

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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If you were at Paul McCartney’s 1969 marriage to Linda Eastman, you’d have noticed someone conspicuously missing — John Lennon. Actually, considering none of Paul’s Beatles bandmates attended, maybe John’s absence wasn’t so surprising.

About a week later, it was John’s turn to tie the knot with Yoko Ono. (They did so in Gibraltar.) Because of the runaway nature of John and Yoko’s nuptials, you didn’t find Paul (or anyone else) in attendance there, either.

After John and Yoko had their marriage certificate, they headed to the Amsterdam Hilton to stage their first “bed-in for peace.” If you’ve heard “The Ballad of John and Yoko,” you know most of this story.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon’s departure from The Beatles split the band and rocked fans all around the world in 1970. The break-up came shortly after the Imagine hitmaker tied the knot with Yoko Ono, with the avant-garde artist bearing the brunt of the blame from The Beatles’ fanbase. The band dissolved following the release of their final album, Let It Be, and Abbey Road, having cemented their place in rock ’n’ roll history.

The split was far from amicable, sparking a feud between Lennon and his former bandmate Paul McCartney, during which they exchanged jibes publicly through the medium of their solo songs.

Later, however, they reconciled and reignited their firm friendship, which dated back to their schooldays.

Many whispers about a potential reunion circulated over the years, particularly in the latter half of the ‘70s, but it never transpired.

Source: Minnie Wright/express.co.uk

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The Walrus himself, Sir Paul McCartney, was recently interviewed by BBC Radio 4’s Sarah Montague. When Montague took McCartney to task over Coldplay’s recent decision to mercifully stop touring due to their awareness of the band’s own “carbon footprint”, McCartney reassured Sarah that he has no plans to do the same. Paul McCarney ‘refuses’ listening to John Lennon songs.

“I am aware of [his carbon footprint], and you do your best. But, it is very difficult if you’re going to tour. I AM going to go on tour in America. You can’t say… ‘we’ll go by Greyhound Bus,’ because that’s just as bad! We certainly can’t just bike our way around. It’s a reality, you just have to do it, and plant a lot of trees… that’s kind of how I offset it, is by doing things that will make up for it. If I tour, that’s going to involve travel, which is going to involve a carbon footprint.”

Source: Mike Mazzarone/alternativenation.net

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Any Beatles fan looking for a way to spend their Christmas cash might consider buying the latest book about the band.

Kenneth Womack’s “Solid State: The Story of ‘Abbey Road’ and the End of the Beatles” puts the Fab Four’s recording of their last album in 1969 in context of the social atmosphere and advanced technology at their disposal. The electronic talk may be a little much for some readers, but it does indicate musical growth.

Remember, “Let it Be” was recorded before “Abbey Road” but released after. Of course, the Beatles’ breakup actually began before the band reconvened to make their last record.

Still, they rallied together to create an album with new sounds, notably George Harrison’s fascination with the Moog synthesizer, Geoff Emerick’s engineering, which complimented the band’s cohesiveness, and George Martin’s arrangements. The overdubs on the song “Because,” which was influenced by a Beethoven piano sonata, resulted in a nine-voice recording.

Source: Robert Hite/thesunflower.com

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Around this time of year, it’s not uncommon to talk about people “of a certain age” having been around long enough not just to read about history, but to experience it.

Peter Asher has seen — has lived — that scope of history in the music world. Not as a witness, but as a person who lived it. And those were the stories he shared with a fascinated, delighted and sold-out Nighttown Monday night, and will again in another sold-out gig at the Cleveland Heights club on Tuesday night.

But “Peter Asher: A Musical Memoir to the ’60s and Beyond” was more than just a PowerPoint recitation of known history, replete with family photos, publicity stills and amazing audio and video clips. It was two-and-a-half hours of tales and anecdotes, interspersed with a little music and a lot of laughs, that put a whole era in perspective for those of us “of a certain age.” And maybe for those who’ve just read about it.

Source: cleveland.com

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The Beatles were never particularly shy about revealing their influences, especially early on in their career. On the Fab Four’s first record (Please Please Me), you couldn’t help but notice the fascination with The Shirelles, the girl group who’d made “Boys” and “Baby It’s You” famous.

On their second U.S. release, fans found the band saluting idol Chuck Berry with a cover of “Roll Over Beethoven” as the first track. Later, fans heard the Fab Four’s take on several Motown hits as well as a cover of a Smokey Robinson track (“You Really Got a Hold on Me”).

Kicking off the second side, listeners got a taste of the Beatles’ live shows with a cover of “Long Tall Sally,” a Little Richard song Paul McCartney loved to shout on the bandstand. Paul once said you had leave your body to pull off a Little Richard vocal.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon and Yoko Ono fell madly in love after meeting in London in 1966. Though they were both married at the time, the avant-garde artist to her second husband Anthony Cox and The Beatles star to his first wife Cynthia Lennon, with whom he had one son, Julian Lennon, they soon started corresponding and later began their famous romance. In 1969, the couple tied the knot at a 10-minute ceremony at the British Consulate Office in Gibraltar.

However, the intensity of their relationship combined with the vicious backlash they faced from angry Beatles fans after the band split shortly after they married (a move many blamed on Ono) soon began to take their toll on Lennon and Ono.

In 1973, he embarked on an affair with their assistant May Pang and moved out of the New York home they shared together to set up house with her in Los Angeles.

The pair had a year-and-a-half romance but he had continued contact with Ono throughout.

Source: Minnie Wright/express.co.uk

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John Lennon’s wit was something special. Whether dropping a one-liner in an interview or rhyming “cigarette” with “stupid get” (at Sir Walter Raleigh’s expense), John had a way of entertaining himself and his audience whenever he spoke.

Of course, John could get himself into trouble when he got on a roll (see: “bigger than Jesus”). But when he kept his focus on the secular, everybody won. In his last major interview, John was at his wittiest when savaging Beatles songs and otherwise describing his life in music.

At several points, John became the target of his own ridicule, as when describing the period that drove him to write “Help!” While taking the interviewer through the very real pain he felt during those months, John couldn’t resist a one-liner. “It was my fat Elvis period,” he said.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles are hailed as the greatest band of all time. To this day, the group’s music has transcended the times and inspired every generation of music since the 1960s. However, early reviews of The Beatles reveal that the group was not always beloved by critics.

Regarded as the most influential group of all time, The Beatles won countless awards during their career and after their break-up. While The Beatles reached critical acclaim, the group did not receive it immediately. In 2014, the Los Angeles Times compiled early reviews from when The Beatles first traveled to the U.S.

“With their bizarre shrubbery, the Beatles are obviously a press agent’s dream combo. Not even their mothers would claim that they sing well,” the Los Angeles Times wrote in 1964.

In 1964, The Boston Globe wrote, “The Beatles are not merely awful; I would consider it sacrilegious to say anything less than that they are god awful. They are so unbelievably horribly, so appallingly unmusical, so dogmatically insensitive to the magic of the art that they qualify as crowned heads of anti-music…”

 

Source: cheatsheet.com

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They remain the biggest band of all time. Yet the Beatles barely lasted a decade and imploded at the end of the 1960s amid rumours of feuds between the band members and their wives. When the devastating news was revealed in 1970, many fans blamed Lennon's wife, Yoko Ono, for tearing the band apart. In a major unearthed interview from 1971, Lennon (with Yoko in the background) discusses the end of the band and the reports of fighting. But is he telling the truth?

Lennon immediately points out that he was with his first wife Cynthia when the Beatles started and it never affected the band. He said: "I was married before the Beatles left Liverpool and that never made a difference."

The other Beatles would certainly have had some loyalty to Cynthia, who John married in 1962, and there was no denying Yoko was the reason that marriage ended. But many believed it was Yoko's artistic career that drove a wedge between Lennon and the band as he put his second wife and her needs first.

Source: Stefan Kyriazis/express.co.uk

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By 1968, The Beatles featured three premiere songwriters vying for space on the band’s records. If you didn’t deliver your best work, there was a good chance your song would get bumped. That happened to George Harrison on Sgt. Pepper a year earlier; then it happened again on The White Album.

Indeed, even on a double album, The Beatles didn’t have room for George’s “Sour Milk Sea” or “Not Guilty.” So it’s safe to say there was some stiff competition at this point in the band’s run. That’s going to happen with Paul McCartney and John Lennon writing songs for the same records.

But the competition didn’t end with songwriting. Since these three Beatles all played guitar, bass, and keyboard, you also had jockeying for who might play what on a particular track. Hence Paul taking a guitar solo on “Taxman” and John doing the same on “Get Back.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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