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Many songs by The Beatles were banned by the BBC for various reasons, such as possible allusions to drugs and sexual references. One song by Paul McCartney in his solo career received a BBC ban. However, the ban was primarily due to a misunderstood lyric. 

While The Beatles kept their music relatively tame, the BBC commonly cracked down on any piece they deemed inappropriate. This ranged from explicit sexual references to light allusions to drugs. The Beatles were often associated with drugs due to some of their more psychedelic tracks. However, the BBC often made assumptions about the band’s lyrics without fully understanding them.

Several Beatles songs that received BBC bans include “A Day in the Life,” “I Am the Walrus,” “Happiness is a Warm Gun,” and “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.” A few of these tracks were not alluding to drugs, even though many believed there were. Many believed “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” referenced LSD, but John Lennon claimed it was based on a drawing by his son. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

 

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George Harrison‘s wife, Olivia, said her husband enjoyed making a good moment better. The former Beatle’s friends would’ve agreed.

In 1974, George met his wife during a terrible time. He was grieving the loss of his first marriage to Pattie Boyd.

“Well, I wasn’t ready to join Alcoholics Anonymous or anything – I don’t think I was that far gone – but I could put back a bottle of brandy occasionally, plus all the other naughty things that fly around,” George told Rolling Stone in 1979.

“I just went on a binge, went on the road . . . all that sort of thing, until it got to the point where I had no voice and almost no body at times. Then I met Olivia and it all worked out fine. There’s a song on the new album, ‘Dark Sweet Lady’: ‘You came and helped me through/ When I’d let go/ You came from out the blue/ Never have known what I’d done without you.’ That sums it up.”

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison knew there was a problem with The Beatles‘ record label, Apple Records. Later, George was smart about artistic recruiting when he created his own record label, Dark Horse Records, and his film production company, HandMade Films. After their manager, Brian Epstein, died in 1967, The Beatles founded Apple Corps, an umbrella company for all their creative endeavors. Some sub-divisions included Apple Retail, Apple Publishing, and Apple Electronics.When The Beatles returned from India in 1968, they founded Apple Records. They set out to be unlike any record company and wanted to give struggling artists a chance to create freely. According to George, The Beatles got control of themselves by creating Apple Records.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote several of The Beatles’ biggest hits. A few songs were written in unique places that wouldn’t usually possess the best songwriting atmosphere. However, McCartney and Lennon often wrote songs whenever inspiration struck, and the two wrote one of their earliest hits while riding a tour bus. 

The Beatles formed in 1960, but it took the band two years to get their first big hit with “Love Me Do.” Their second single, “Please Please Me,” reached No. 2 on the UK Singles Chart. The Beatles were on the rise following that song and later went on tour as the supporting act for singer Helen Shapiro. In Anthology, John Lennon said he and Paul McCartney wrote their third single, “From Me to You” on the tour bus. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon was told some of The Beatles’ songs embodied him.
John named the band’s songs that really meant something to him.
He also named the tracks that reminded him of Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.

A journalist told John Lennon some of The Beatles’ songs embodied the singer. John said he wasn’t sure if one of the songs mentioned meant anything to him. Subsequently, he named a handful of Fab Four songs that mattered to him.

The book The Beatles: Paperback Writer includes an interview with Jonathan Cott from 1968. In it, Cott discussed The Beatles’ music.

“I’ve listed a group of songs that I associate with you, in terms of what you are or what you were, songs that struck me as embodying you a little bit: ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away,’ ‘Strawberry Fields [Forever],’ ‘It’s Only Love,’ ‘She Said She Said,’ ‘Lucy in the Sky [With Diamonds],’ ‘I’m Only Sleeping,’ ‘Run for Your Life,’ ‘I Am the Walrus,’ ‘All You Need Is Love,’ ‘Rain,’ ‘Girl,'” he said.

Source: Matthew Trzcin details

John Lennon used his Beatles notoriety to promote causes of peace and love. His life was tragically cut short when he was murdered in 1980. According to historian David Bedford, Lennon had a fear of death since the ‘60s. It all started when friend and former bass player Stuart Sutcliffe died of a brain hemorrhage in 1962 at the age of 21.Bedford was a guest on the Beatles City podcast on Aug. 23, 2020 to discuss Sutcliffe. The author was then running the Sutcliffe fan club and revealed how Sutcliffe’s death impacted Lennon.Bedford has authored books on The Beatles such as Liddypool: Birthplace of the Beatles, Looking for Lennon, and The Beatles: Fab Four Cities. In his research and interviews, he discovered a consistent account of Lennon after Sutcliffe’s death. “John became a bit of a fatalist,” Bedford said on Beatles City. “He felt that anybody who got close to him was going to die. And he never really shook that off. He carried that with him because so many people got close to him and died. In a way, he was scared to form relationships.”

Source: Fred Topel/cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison thought it was funny that people called 1987’s Cloud Nine his comeback album. He didn’t go anywhere. George still made music; he just didn’t release it because he was sick of the record company and fans’ demands for hits.

Besides, George couldn’t call Cloud Nine a comeback album because he didn’t see himself as a “fully-fledged showbiz star.”

George never pursued a solo career. He only released All Things Must Pass as a reaction to leaving The Beatles. He had to release his stockpile of songs to move forward. When the triple album did well, George continued releasing music. However, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, George realized the record companies wanted more from him.

They wanted music that all sounded the same, that followed the same formula. Once MTV arrived, they wanted music videos and lots of promotion. It was all a pointless competition for hits, and George had never been competitive.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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Before becoming much better known for their original music, most bands start out doing their own versions of their favorite songs from other artists. The Beatles were no exception, as it would be way too much to assume they came out swinging with "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and magically transformed popular music as we know it with their brilliant compositions. As any Beatles fan worth their salt will tell you, the band, once they had fully evolved from John Lennon's skiffle band the Quarrymen, got their start by covering songs from American rock 'n' roll performers, of which there were many who would eventually reach legendary status. But which of these acts did they cover the most?

Source: Lorenzo Tanos/grunge.com

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The Beatles were not afraid to express their political views, especially Paul McCartney and John Lennon. They often expressed their opinions through their music in subtle and direct ways. One class Beatles song, written by McCartney, led to the bassist having a full circle moment years after the band disbanded. “It was in the era of civil rights, and I was watching the Little Rock episode where the kids were being booed and shouted at and as the black kids as they were going into the school,” McCartney shared. “And so this idea of ‘Blackbird’ became black girl in my mind.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr had a bit of a rocky start with The Beatles. Producer George Martin replaced him when the band recorded the single “Love Me Do.” and Ringo got replaced again when he struggled to play the drums on his solo debut. Still, his timekeeping skills helped propel the Fab Four to international fame. When it came time to finally record a drum solo with The Beatles toward the end of their run, Ringo copied a famous 1960s song to get the job done.Ringo called the B-side “Rain” one of The Beatles’ weird tracks because he played in a way he never had before. The song is almost like one big solo since he drops impressively busy fills throughout it. Still, he never grabs the spotlight for himself in the tune. Ringo never wanted to take center stage in The Beatles.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon had a particular affinity for his wife’s long, blonde hair. That is, until she cut it short and he didn’t speak to her for two days. Here’s what Cynthia Lennon said about the Beatles’ member and his reaction to her short locks in her 2005 memoir John.

John Lennon began writing and performing music while in college. He partnered with Paul McCartney and George Harrison for the Quarrymen. Around the same time, he started a relationship with Cynthia Lennon (then Cynthia Powell). She was also a student at Liverpool College of Art.

In her 2005 memoir, Cynthia Lennon noted John Lennon’s particular affinity for her hair. At one point, she even dyed her locks a lighter shade of blonde to grab his attention. It worked — the two started their relationship shortly after. 

The couple remained together as the Beatles rose in popularity, with John and Cynthia Lennon officially marrying in 1962 after an unexpected pregnancy. They had their first child, Julian, in 1963.

Source:Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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That's exactly what happened when he guested on an episode of "Carpool Karaoke." The legendary performer rolled through his hometown of Liverpool with host James Corden, sharing memories of the city, surprising fans in his favorite pub, and bringing all of us a badly needed emotional release with his music.

The most prevailing themes in The Beatles' music are those of love, peace, joy, and togetherness. It's the kind of music that you put on during the happiest times and when you've had a really rough day.

One of the most comforting songs in difficult times is "Let It Be," and that's no accident. During their road trip, McCartney told Corden it was inspired by a dream of his late mother.

"My mum, who died, came to me in the dream and was reassuring me, saying it's gonna be OK, let it be." McCartney said. "I wrote the song 'Let It Be,' but it was [inspired by] her positivity."

Source: Mark Shrayber/upworthy.com

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Despite receiving all kinds of treatment for various cancers worldwide, George Harrison still made time to work on music in his last months. He worked on his final album, Brainwashed, and contributed to some of his friends’ albums.

In 1997, doctors diagnosed George with throat cancer. They successfully removed the lump, and George underwent two radiation treatments at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London.

George downplayed his illness by saying, “I am very lucky. I’m not going to die on you folks just yet.” Shortly after becoming cancer-free, George almost died in a home invasion in 1999. The former Beatle also downplayed the injuries he sustained during the attack. However, George’s son, Dhani, later said they likely took years off George’s life.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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While The Beatles was their band name, the four members were always themselves. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr shared their authentic selves in their songwriting and public personas. However, on one album, The Beatles pretended to be different types of people. 

In an interview with Barnes & Noble’s James Daunt, Paul McCartney asked if he ever pretended to be Wings or The Beatles while performing. McCartney said he has always been himself during his music career, except for one album with The Beatles. The album was Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

“We weren’t pretending to be beetles. That was just, we thought that was just a great group name that a lot of girls particularly thought was creepy,” McCartney explained. “I wasn’t pretending to be Wings. It was, again, it was a group name. But we were pretending to be Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band because that was the whole idea of that record.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr and George Harrison collaborated musically for years, but they had shared interests far outside of writing and performing music. Harrison was an avid gardener — his wife said he would want to be remembered as this over a musician — and his keen interest drew in Starr as well. The Beatles drummer talked about the way a series of gifts from Harrison fostered an interest in gardening for him as well.

In 1970, Harrison bought Friar Park, a sprawling estate in Henley-on-Thames, England. The mansion’s extensive grounds were what first interested Harrison in gardening. He threw himself into the hobby.

“He’d be like, ‘Get that pond, put it over there, and move that hill. Don’t like that hill,'” his son Dhani Harrison said in the documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World. “And the next week, it would be pond over there, hill over there. And it would look better.”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles were known as The Fab Four. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison were all super famous as a band in the ‘60s. Even after The Beatles broke up, each musician had their own lucrative solo career. Of course, Beatlemaniacs each had their favorites, and that included the bandmates themselves. Starr was a guest on the Broken Record with Rick Rubin podcast on Sept. 21, 2021. He was promoting his EP, Change the World, his second of that year after Zoom In. Of course, Rubin couldn’t help but ask about the Beatles, and Starr came up with this juicy tidbit about rooming with McCartney. Being in The Beatles together meant more than just playing together. Lennon and McCartney were a prolific songwriting duo. They also spent lots of time together on the road. McCartney even shared that when their car broke down, the four huddled in a “Beatle Sandwich” to keep warm. 

Source: Fred Topel/cheatsheet.com

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As December beckons, our Christmas classic playlists will begin booming away with their festive merriment if they haven’t already. One song Brits will no doubt hear over and over again in shopping malls, supermarkets and at parties over the holiday period is Slade’s 1973 hit Merry Xmas Everybody. The band’s best-selling single has sold in excess of one million copies and beat Wizzard’s I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday to No 1 that year. But did you know that Noddy Holder’s band have The Beatles’ John Lennon to thank for their most famous track?

Slade guitarist Dave Hill spoke with Jackie Brambles on her Greatest Hits Radio show this evening when he made the reveal. The 76-year-old confessed that his band only went into a US studio after Lennon had cancelled a solo recording session that day.

The rocker shared: “We were in New York in the summer of 1973 – it was 100 degrees, it certainly wasn’t Christmas! – and we didn’t' really know this song, but when John Lennon cancelled his time in Record Plant Studios we went in just to do this Christmas number. The studio is in an office block, so we were all in the foyer at half nine in the morning try details

This week marks the 21st anniversary of George Harrison's death. The Beatles star lost his battle against cancer on November 29, 2001. But before his final days, he arranged to meet up with his former bandmates, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, on a momentous occasion that included "laughter and love" as well as a few tears.

Harrison seemingly didn't want to dwell on the sadness of their meeting, however. So, just 17 days before his death, Harrison invited McCartney and Starr to a hotel room in Manhattan where he was staying at the time. Together, the three Beatles reminisced about old times and said their goodbyes.

Harrison’s doctor, Gil Lederman, also attended the meeting to monitor the star’s health. He later revealed what happened in the final, fateful meeting between the three Beatles.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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On Tuesday, George Harrison’s wife took to Instagram to mourn the loss of the Beatles legend, 21 years after he passed from lung cancer.
Harrison passed away in 2001 after a long battle with cancer.
In the 20+ years since the tragic loss of the legendary musician, there have been great advances when it comes to treating lung cancer — even advanced disease.
Newer treatments, like immunotherapy and targeted agents, can dramatically improve the length and quality of life for patients.

The wife of Beatles great George Harrison took to Instagram on Tuesday to mourn the loss of her husband, 21 years after the legendary rock star passed from lung cancer. Harrison was just 58 years old when he passed away in 2001. In the heartfelt post, Olivia Harrison shared a video of George while a live version of the

Source: Laura Gesualdi-Gilmore/survivornet.com

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Yoko Ono received a famously chilly reception from The Beatles, but Ringo Starr said he always liked his bandmate’s wife. He was the only Beatle who flew to her side after John Lennon’s murder, and Lennon never felt the same anger toward Starr as George Harrison and Paul McCartney. Starr explained that he understood the connection between Lennon and Ono, which made him more receptive to her. He also shared what made him like Ono.Lennon and Ono met at an art gallery in 1966, when he was married to his first wife, Cynthia Lennon. They connected quickly, and Lennon soon split up with Cynthia and married Ono. The couple was famously close — Ono was a near-constant presence at Beatles recording sessions. This frustrated McCartney and Harrison, but Starr never had as much of a problem with her presence.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr established himself as a talented drummer early in his career. Then he changed drumming forever with The Beatles. He earned fame and fortune with the Fab Four, but one Beatles insider once explained how Ringo and his wife lived like simple people even after they purchased a huge estate.

Ringo moved from Liverpool to London once The Beatles made it big. England’s capital city was also the epicenter of the country’s music scene, so he vacated the working-class port town for cosmopolitan London.

The drummer shared a place with bandmate George Harrison. Then he moved to an apartment in Montagu Square, not far from Buckingham Palace. When Ringo and his wife, Maureen, were expecting their first child, they moved out of the apartment to a house near John Lennon’s residence in Weybridge outside of the city. (The two bandmates lived less than a mile apart). Yet the former Richard Starkey still held the lease, and the apartment became a playground for his famous friends.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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The Monkees’ Davy Jones was present during the recording of The Beatles’ “Revolution 1.”
Peter Tork worked on George Harrison’s first solo album, Wonderwall Music.
A writer explained why members of the Prefab Four crossed paths with the Fab Four so much.

The Monkees‘ Davy Jones was there during the recording of The Beatles’ “Revolution 1.” During an interview, a writer explained why he was present for the recording. The writer revealed the Fab Four had many connections to the Prefab Four.

Andrew Sandoval is the author of The Monkees: The Day-by-Day Story of the 60s TV Pop Sensation. During a 2021 interview with Rolling Stone, he revealed The Monkees’ Mike Nesmith spent time at John Lennon’s home while Micky Dolenz spent time at Paul McCartney’s home. “The Beatles had no reason to invite these people into their homes other than they seemed to really like them,” Sandoval said. 

Sandoval discussed other connections between the two bands. “That’s another interesting story,” he said. “Why did George Harrison get Peter Tork to play banjo on his first solo work, Wonderwall& details

John Lennon was the father of Julian Lennon — even if his fame with the Beatles impacted their relationship. Here’s what Cynthia Lennon said about John Lennon’s short trip to the hospital in her 2005 memoir. 

In 1962, John and Cynthia Lennon got married after an unexpected pregnancy. In 1963, their first child, Julian Lennon, was born. 

With Cynthia Lennon’s mother away in another country and John Lennon on tour with the Beatles, Cynthia Lennon was alone in the hospital when she gave birth to her son.

Busy with the Beatles, Lennon didn’t get a chance to visit his wife and son until 3 days after his birth. Cynthia Lennon described their reunion in her 2005 memoir, John. There were only complications because of John Lennon’s rising star power, which extended to the hospital. 

“John arranged for me to be moved into a private room; he knew that both he and I might attract unwelcome attention if I stayed in the public ward,” Cynthia Lennon wrote. “It was wonderful to see him, but privacy was impossible.” 

Source: Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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When The Beatles first formed, Pete Best served as the band’s drummer before being replaced by Ringo Starr. While all parties appeared to move forward amicably, John Lennon had some harsh feelings toward the drummer, which he shared years later. 

Best first met The Beatles at the Casbah Coffee Club, which was opened by his mother. The Beatles played several concerts there in their early days and invited Best to join the band in 1960. In an interview shared by Express, John Lennon recalled asking Best to join The Beatles on a trip to Hamburg, Germany. 

“We knew of this guy. He was living in his mother’s house that had a club in it, and he had a drum kit, so we dragged him, auditioned him, and he could keep one beat going for long enough, so we took him to Germany,” Lennon said. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Celebrities have always struggled with their perceived public image, which is always on display to their fans and critics. This seems to be the case with Paul McCartney, a member of The Beatles who recently revealed how hard it was to live with his normal self against the stereotype he had already been labeled with.

Like all other band members, Paul also earned a nickname — in his case “the Cute Beatle” — from fans, which he usually disliked.
The songwriter claimed that the only time he did not resent his moniker was when he played himself in the 1964 movie, A Hard Day’s Night.“No, I didn’t mind it. No, no; I still don’t, I was in a film. I don’t care what they picture me as,” he told Rolling Stone. “So far as I’m concerned, I’m just doing a job in a film. If the film calls for me to be a cheerful chap, well, great; I’ll be a cheerful chap.”

Source: doyouremember.com

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