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He is rarely seen in public with both daughters simultaneously. But Sir Paul McCartney changed all that when he stepped out with daughters Mary and Stella on Friday evening in central London. The Liverpudlian star, 73, looked delighted to join his glamorous offspring at the BAFTA screening of new film This Beautiful Fantastic. 

Cutting a dapper figure, the Beatles star had clearly dressed to impress for the occasion. Stepping out in a navy blue, pin-striped suit, he matched the ensemble with a classic white shirt and a pair of leather-effect shoes. Sporting brown hair, he looked considerably younger than his years.

Not to be out-done, Mary was also out in force - wearing a conservative, yet trendy, look. This consisted of a pair of fitted, black trousers with a square-neck blouse and a silk jacket, complete with baseball collars and equinn detailing. Scooping her hair up into a classy bun, she struck a dramatic resemblance to her famous father. 

Source: Daily Mail

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All You Need Is Love proves all you need for a terrific night out is a rocking good live band, the sublime talents of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra, the comfort and acoustics of the Adelaide Festival Centre and the song writing genius of the greatest band there ever was.

Throw in the considerable singing prowess of four guys clearly enjoying a musical “bromance” and it’s hard to go wrong.

Featuring a catalogue of 30 Beatles songs primarily from their psychedelic period – that have captivated more than one generation – it is all aboard the ‘Mystery Tour’ through to a rousing hand waving encore of Hey Jude.

Ciaran Gribbin, an Irishman brought to Australia to front INXS five years ago, was the standout vocalist in the first half engaging the pack audience with some Irish charm and singing the pants off I Am The Walrus.

Darren Percival and Jackson Thomas, both runners-up in series of The Voice Australia, showed they will be remembered for more that reality TV appearances.

Percival was at his best with Fool On The Hill and Something while Jackson has a sublime voice and handled the tricky Let It Be with star quality.

By: Craig Cook

So details

Maurice White, 1941–2016 - Friday, February 05, 2016

FOUNDER OF 2016 RECORDING ACADEMY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENTS EARTH, WIND & FIRE DIES AT 74

Maurice White, founder of 2016 Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipients Earth, Wind & Fire, died Feb. 3 following a lengthy battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 74.

White founded Earth, Wind & Fire in Chicago in 1969 and shared lead vocal duties with Philip Bailey. He served as the supergroup's principal songwriter and producer for classic albums such as 1971's Earth, Wind & Fire, 1975's That's The Way Of The World and 1976's Spirit. White also co-wrote many Earth, Wind & Fire classics, including "September," "Shining Star" and "Let's Groove."

White earned seven GRAMMY wins, including the group's first career win for Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus for "Shining Star" for 1975. He won a GRAMMY for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s) for 1978 for Earth, Wind & Fire's cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life." Earth, Wind & Fire were recently announced as 2016 recipients of The Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. A special ceremony and concert celebrating this year's Special Merit Award recipients will be held in t details

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the release of “Revolver,” the greatest album by The Beatles, the greatest band of the modern era. Its best song, “For No One,” the best composition by this era’s best songwriter, Paul McCartney, is a 122-second triumph. It starts suddenly. No instrumental introduction to get the ear ready for the melody or the mind ready for the lyrics. We awake in a flash: “Your day breaks / Your mind aches.

It’s a not uncommon trick, this jarring start; perfect for when the writer wants to set a tone from the jump. Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong uses it to establish the punk twitchiness of the melodic marvel “Basket Case.” Squeeze uses it to foreshadow the climactic theme of “Pulling Muscles (From the Shell).” Like McCartney, Kesha (!) uses it in “TiK ToK” to start the day (“Wake up in the morning / Feelin’ like P-Diddy”)&dmash;though, admittedly, to tell about a very different kind of day.

What sets “For No One” apart, though, is the sudden sorrow. The Beatles used a similar approach in Lennon’s superb “Help!” The instant exclamation “Help details

Another Beatles book? You’d be forgiven for thinking there couldn’t possibly be anything left to be written about the Fab Four. Every aspect of their career has been excavated and explored in print so many times. With the exception of Bob Dylan, surely no popular musicians have been subject to such extensive investigation.

However, this latest addition to the canon offers perspective on the band that is as interesting as it is infuriating. Interesting because it considers some of the major legal spats involving the band in their lifetime; infuriating because time after time in Stan Soocher’s obsessively detailed book, one is left with the feeling that as songwriters the Beatles may have had rare talent, but as businessmen they were naive to the point of stupidity.

The book’s strength lies in the ability of its author, an academic and entertainment business attorney, to apply his knowledge of the law to existing files and recently released documentation. Winnowing out irrelevances, he draws some of the remaining threads together into a clearly constructed narrative, which can be read as three simple sub-narratives: the business chaos during the Brian Epstein era; the rise in legal wranglin details

A photograph of the late Beatle George Harrison celebrating his 21st birthday in Los Angeles is expected to attract worldwide attention.

The 1964 colour image shows George, dressed in a blue shirt and grey trousers, opening a huge ‘key to the door’ to celebrate the milestone.

The back of the picture is captioned: ‘George Harrison of the Beatles. 21st birthday party in Los Angeles 1964’. A mystery man can be seen strumming a guitar behind the Liverpool musician.

The lot will go on sale with Suffolk auctioneers Martlesham on February 18 with a catalogue guide price of between £30-£50.

Auctioneer Chris Elmy said: “This picture has travelled a long way from Los Angeles and will, no doubt, continue its journey as there are collectors of Beatles memorabilia all over the world.”

By: Laura Tacey

Source: Liverpool Echo

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Why Ringo rules - Thursday, February 04, 2016

With the welcome news that Ringo Starr & His All Star Band are set to play Cross Insurance Center in Bangor on June 8, it’s a good time to assess some of Starr’s greatness. The Beatles would not have been the group we know today without him.

For starters, he completed the group. They truly became The Beatles when Ringo officially joined the band in August 1962, four years after John, Paul and George began playing together. When Ringo accepted the job, the chemical reaction synthesized by the coming together of those precise personalities created a form of divine magic that can never be duplicated.

Ringo: “Every time he (Pete Best, previous Beatles drummer) was sick, they would ask me to sit in.”

George Harrison: “I was the one responsible for getting Ringo in the group. Every time Ringo played with us, the band just really swung then. I did conspire to get Ringo in and talk to John and Paul until they came around to the idea.”

Paul McCartney: “We really started thinking that we needed THE great drummer in Liverpool. And the great drummer in our eyes was this guy called Ringo Starr.”

By: Mike Dow

Source: The Main Edge

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Whisper it quietly but music royalty Sir Paul McCartney may put in an appearance at this year's Concert At The Kings in All Cannings, near Devizes. There have been rumours that McCartney would take to the stage at Rock Against Cancer since it was first held five years ago. But this time co-organiser John 'Grubby' Callis believes it could happen. And as Grubby is McCartney's sound engineer he should know. He said on Friday: "He has the date and he has promised me that he will appear one year. This is our fifth anniversary so why not this year. But I doubt we will know until very near the time."

Last year McCartney did not make it to All Cannings to join the likes of Lindisfarne and Squeeze but Mr Callis revealed he had made a substantial donation to the event which raises money for a number of cancer charities and local good causes.

The first four concerts have raised a total of more than £112,000 and there are high hopes that this year's on May 21 will be even more successful. It has grown hugely since Mr Callis along with Kings Arms landlord Richard Baulu and Andy Scott guitarist with The Sweet came up with the idea.

By: Joanne Moore

Source: Gazette and Herald

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How do you like your Beatles? Mark Bryant’s second annual Beatlefest at the Spire this last Friday and Saturday served them up in four distinct flavors and no one went away hungry.

First up Friday night were the inimitable local favorites, 3rd Left, who offered a variety of Lennon-McCartney tunes – and one Wing’s hit, raw.

That is not to say their music was undercooked but, rather, as fresh as possible and a packed house that was decidedly older than their usual fans went wild for every serving.

“That reaction was well deserved,” Bryant told the Old Colony this week, as he began to assess the weekend’s mania. “They always step it up, but when things are on the line that’s the band you want.”

Bryan recalled how last year after 3rd Left’s show an “older gentlemen” approached him and said that the band’s passionate performance had literally brought tears to his eyes.

This past Friday a packed house was a bit emotional as well, on their feet for almost every song the local band played, from their opening saxophone-guitar “Blackbird” duet, through spectacular renditions of “While My Guitar Gently We details

"Thank you, NME, for this great honour. I accept this as your encouragement for me to keep making my 'Sound of Music'." That’s what Yoko Ono – icon, artist, activist and musician – said of the ‘Lifetime Inspiration Award’ she will pick up the NME Awards with Austin, Texas on February 17. The ceremony will be held the at O2 Academy in Brixton and will see Ono, who turns 83 the day after the event, thanked for the massive impact she’s had on pop culture in the last 50 years, from pioneering contemporary art to inspiring John Lennon, whom she married in 1969. Here are eleven times Yoko Ono helped to shape the face of popular culture forever. 

Grapefruit

Ono’s 1964 art-book Grapefruit is full of instructions and aphorisms such as: “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is a reality.” The messages within the book seem simple, but her real talent lies in the clarity required to achieve that simplicity. When you consider the 140-character nature of Twitter (which Ono’s pretty excellent at), you can see how ahead of her time she was. 

‘Bed-In’

In 1969, Ono and Lennon staged two identical protes details

It's not just budding pop stars Adele has inspired with incredible third album 25, even music legends are following her lead. I can reveal that Paul McCartney is working on new material with producer Greg Kurstin, the mastermind behind her now-iconic single Hello. The Beatles star has songs ready for a new album and, having been so impressed by Adele’s comeback, called on Greg to help him hone them.

A music insider revealed: “Paul loved what Greg did with Adele and knows he can add something special to his record. “He is really embracing the pop direction of his last album and wants to continue in that vein with his new stuff.

“It’s a huge coup as Greg is without doubt the most sought-after producer at the moment. “He was going to produce Paul’s full album but is going to work on a couple of tracks first and they will take it from there.” Last year Adele admitted that without Greg, record-breaking album 25 may never have seen the light of day.

Discussing the moment they came up with Hello during a session in 2013, she said: “This song was a massive breakthrough for me with my writing because it had been pretty slow up to this point.

Source: Th details

THE Beatles may never have made it to Clacton but that doesn’t mean they didn’t leave their mark on the resort. Thirty years after A Hard’s Day’s Night was screened at the now long-lost Odeon, in West Avenue, fan and musician Karl Johnson found himself in a time-warp dating back to the Fab Four’s heyday.

“It was a little disused hotel bedroom at the top of either the Criterion on Pier restaurant, facing the sea, and it was covered from top to bottom in Beatles wallpaper,” said Karl. “There had been a rumour that the Beatles were almost booked to appear at the Princes Theatre in 1964 and this wallpaper had been there since then. “Most of it was still intact, stuck on to the crumbling walls of this Victorian room. “I went there with my dad and we stripped it all off because they were refurbishing it. “It seemed to still be in good condition but once it was removed from the walls the brittle paper just crumbled apart. “We had a hell of a job getting it off the wall. Some of it wouldn’t come off and some of it was damp.”

Dad Derek was an antiques dealer. They saved what they could and mounted it onto cards before sending it off for a details

Get ready for the British Invasion at Henry Ford Museum. Beginning April 30, 2016, The Magical History Tour: A Beatles Memorabilia Exhibition will take visitors on an unprecedented journey of the Fab Four’s ground-breaking career that’s not to be missed. The Magical History Tour offers guests the opportunity to retrace the steps of the Beatles and the way in which they changed the music industry and influenced American pop culture with the best private collection ever assembled, that highlights their formatives years in Liverpool and Hamburg, the screaming fans across the world and goes into the studio for the creation of some of the most innovative music in history.

Fans and visitors will experience the exhibition in a fast-forward journey from birth to fame to breakup and beyond. The robust multi-sensory galleries include:

Beginnings, Influence and Life in Liverpool: Guests will be immersed in the atmosphere of late 50s/early 60s Liverpool. Part of the very stage that supported some of the band’s early shows is on display, as well as instruments, personal letters and photographs, and various documents detailing the growing fame of the Fab Four. These artifacts are incredibly rare, as they com details

Was 1966 pop music’s greatest year? - Sunday, January 31, 2016

On 10 June, 1966, The Beatles released their 12th single, Paperback Writer. Relegated to the B-side was Rain, an altogether stranger song that signalled a sea-change in the Beatles music and in their collective consciousness. Written in the wake of John Lennon’s first encounters with LSD, its metaphorical language and richly textured musical backdrop – the basic track recorded, then slowed down, the vocals multi-tracked and set against a droning guitar and pulsing bass – was an evocation of the hallucinogenic experience.

Rain was a signal of what was to come: Revolver. Released on 5 August, 1966, it changed everything, shifting the locus of pop from the single to the album, and announcing a period of intense creative momentum that arguably has not been equalled since.

Alongside the more meanderingly brilliant White Album from 1968, Revolver is The Beatles’ album I return to most. Listening to it 50 years on, there is a freshness to it that is remarkable, but it also speaks about another time, and another pop culture, that was more idealistic, adventurous and altogether less narcissistic than today’s. As Beatles scholar Ian MacDonald notes inhis illuminating close-reading of their so details

The Beatles' rooftop concert was the climax of a project originally titled Get Back. It was conceived as exactly that, a return to their rock roots in a desperate effort to restore unity when business and personal chaos threatened to destroy the band. A documentary crew filmed the Beatles rehearsing and recording new material for an "honest" album, free from the studio wizardry that had dominated their recent work. The experience pushed the group to the point of disintegration, but they needed an end to the film. 

So 47 years ago — on January 30th, 1969 — the band climbed five stories to the top of their Apple Corps headquarters and played their last concert together. The album and film were ultimately released in May 1970 as Let It Be, their swan song. Here are 15 little-known facts about the Beatles' final bow on the world stage. 

The concert was originally going to take place in an ancient amphitheater.

Or on a cruise ship. Or in the desert. The Beatles had many ideas about where to perform the climactic concert for their new film — too many ideas. London venues like the Palladium and the Roundhouse were some of the more levelheaded propositions, but most were pretty far-ou details

Which band member wrote the most of The Fab Four's 310 songs? How many Beatles songs weren't written about love? And how much did Ringo actually contribute to the band?

These questions were once fertile ground for many a furious pub debate, but now, in the glorious information age that we presently inhabit, we simply look to the internet for the definitive answers to these sorts of big questions. And our search for Beatles knowledge has just dramatically shortened - may we present to you: the Beatles analysis graph.

Complied by analytical artist Adam E. McCann for the interactive data visualisation site Tableau, the Beatles Analysis visual is quite something: stocked full of mountains of data about almost everything Paul, John, George and even Ringo ever did, it reels through stats on lyrical vocabulary, song meanings, chart positions, and much, much more. It truly is something that you could lose hours of your life to - so why not go ahead and do just that right now?

 

By: Sam Moore

Source: NME

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51 years after the Beatles played the Indianapolis State Fair on September 3rd, 1964 and 46 years after the Beatles were photographed crossing Abbey Road in Northwest London, America's self-proclaimed first and only full-time Beatles scholar, Aaron Krerowicz, has returned to live right here in Indiana, our very own Crossroads of America.

Winter Solstice in Indianapolis: I trample rainy streets and brave unseasonably warm temperatures in Broad Ripple to talk with Krerowicz at Yats – and to dine while dishing on the Fab Four. Krerowicz stands 6'4", so I easily spot him in the crowd. He order, we found a table and promptly agree Yats ranks high on the favorite cuisine list. He devoured chili cheese etouffee with extra bread. (Smart man.)

Born and raised in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Krerowicz deftly exited at 18 for the wilds of Indianapolis to attend Butler University for a degree in Music Theory and Composition, then headed east to Massachusetts and Connecticut for graduate degrees in Music Composition.

He decided to use that education and leave all part-time jobs behind to hit the lecture circuit full-time for his passion. He has three self-published books: The Beatles & The Avant-Garde, From the Shad details

The EP by music collective Mercblecket was released in 1964, a full three years before the Fab Four unveiled their creative tour-de-force, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, in 1967. The Mercblecket EP, which ironically features the band performing covers of four Beatles songs and is titled Mercblecket Beats The Beatles, has a cover featuring several of the musicians standing centre-stage in front of a bass drum daubed with the band's name, while wearing military guardsman's jackets. They are flanked on either side and behind by other members of the group.

The Sgt. Pepper cover famously features the Fab Four wearing guardsman's jackets while standing in front of a bass drum daubed with the album's title. On both sides, and behind them, is an array of black and white cutouts of the band's heroes. Although the sleeve was designed by Peter Blake and Jann Haworth, they were working from an ink drawing by MCCartney showing the basic concept for the artwork.

It is believed a member of Mercblecket, Roger Wallis, gave MCCartney a copy of the record when The Beatles visited Sweden in 1964. Record dealer Jorgen Johansson has tracked down a rare copy and is trying to unravel the mystery.

Source: Contact Music details

Elton John intimidated by John Lennon - Saturday, January 30, 2016

Sir Elton John was "quite intimidated" by John Lennon.

The 'Rocket Man' hitmaker used to enjoy hanging out with the late Beatles legend - whose last public performance came with Elton in New York's Madison Square Gardens in 1974 - but admits he was wary of his "abrasive" humour, though he only ever saw the "kind" side of his pal.

He said: "We got on like a house on fire. We hung out for a couple of years. "[I don't know why we got on so well] Sense of humour? I found him very kind, very funny, I don't know why we clicked by we did, and he clicked with my band and the people around me. And we had so much fun.

"I was quite intimidated by him because I knew he was razor sharp and could be abrasive, but that side of him never came out with me, only the kind side and the funny side." Elton was also intimidated when he worked with one of his performing idols, the late Nina Simone, when she sang at Sting and wife Trudy Styler's biannual Rock the Rainforest gig at New York's Carnegie Hall in 2002.

He recalled: "I played on Nina Simone's last gig at the Rainforest [benefit] and Elizabeth Taylor did her last work with me, in 'Original Sin' in the video, so three incredible legends, I did their last thing w details

What may be the world’s most famous car is outta sight most of the time but it is not forgotten.

The Royal B.C. Museum has posted the job of caring for the mechanical needs of its bright yellow 1965 Rolls-Royce Phantom V, first owned and customized by Beatle John Lennon. Jim Walters, owner of Bristol Motors, which specializes in Rolls-Royce and Bentley vehicles, was the car’s caretaker between 1993 and 2015. B.C. regulations now require the opportunity to be posted publicly, he said.

Walters plans to apply.

The museum intends to line up mechanical services as needed for three years, with options to renew for two one-year periods, bid documents state. The closing date is Feb. 18. Walters’s time with the car started after he was contacted 23 years ago to do some work on a Rolls. Entering an underground parking lot, he was “flabbergasted” to see Lennon’s car. “To be asked to look after the car was a mind-blowing experience.”

Under an agreement with the museum, Walters stored the car for free, paid its insurance and was able to use it in advertising. That eventually turned into a paid arrangement. Lennon’s Rolls was a gift from Vancouver businessm details

Ringo Starr's Liverpool birthplace is likely to be saved after years of uncertainty and wrangling.

Liverpool City Council is being asked to approve proposals by developers Place First to demolish and refurbish terraces in the Welsh Streets district. Some homes will be knocked together to appeal to families, while others will be knocked down.

Last year, then Communities Secretary Eric Pickles overturned his planning inspector's backing for a housing plan.

The streets are known as Welsh Streets as they are named after the Welsh towns of the construction workers who built the terraces in the 19th Century.

Ringo Starr used to live at 9 Madryn Street - which is one of the 200 homes that would be refurbished. Sources differ on how long Starr lived there, with some suggestions it was three years before his family moved to nearby Admiral Grove, where he was living as a teenager shortly before The Beatles found fame.

'Insult to injury' Joe Anderson, Liverpool's Mayor, said 80% of residents backed the original plans for this area. "As a result of the prevarication over this scheme from different outside interest groups, we have lost a £13m government grant," he said. "However, given that the details

The Beatles Story has been shortlisted for national awards for two campaigns it has run in the past year.

The Albert Dock attraction’s Imagine No Food Poverty and Beatles Ambassadors campaigns are in the running for the accolades. It is shortlisted for Integrated Campaign of The Year and Digital Campaign of the Year for its Imagine No Food Poverty and Beatles Ambassadors campaigns in the Marketing Minds Awards.

A chocolate brownie was created by Merseyside charity Can Cook to sell at The Beatles Story to celebrate what would have been John Lennon’s 75th birthday.

Proceeds from the 1,200 sold since October have paid for almost 600 meals to feed those in need in Merseyside.

Meanwhile the Beatles Ambassadors competition saw people from 52 countries all over the world compete to be named the biggest Beatles fan. There were 25 Ambassadors chosen, while the ultimate prize was presented to Tere Chacon, from Mexico.

The Imagine No Food Poverty Campaign is also shortlisted in the Marketing Campaign of the Year SME in the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) Awards. Beatles Story marketing manager Diane Glover said: “We’re immensely proud to have been shortlisted for three details

IS Paul McCartney being a rock tease?

The 73 year old former Beatle posted a vintage photo of him draped in an Australian flag on his social media accounts yesterday. “Salutations to our cousins down under on Australia Day,” the message read. “Have a great one. Watch out for flying Kangaroos!”

The post, presumably by McCartney’s digital team, was flooded with comments from Australian fans hoping it meant he was finally ready to return down under. McCartney has not mentioned the occasion in the past. McCartney’s last Australian tour was in 1993, but whispers suggest he may be back at the end of 2016.

However the flag photo he used was taken 14 years ago to promote a cancelled Australian tour, which opened old wounds for some bitter fans.

Two shows in Melbourne for November 2002 were abruptly cancelled just a month before they were due to take place. McCartney cited the Bali bombing (which had taken place a fortnight before) as the reason and the fact he felt Australia was still in need of healing, not hearing Hey Jude. “This is not the appropriate time for a rock show,” McCartney said in a statement. He gave no date for a rescheduled event and said & details

Staring at her reflection in the old recording booth window, Michelle Graham recalled a seemingly long-lost era.

“It is very, very sad,” Graham, 48, said, pausing to look around the damp, moldy studio. “I just wish you all had seen it back the way it was before.”

When it was opened by George Martin in 1979, AIR (Associated Independent Recording) studio was a state-of-the-art recording facility which just happened to be in Montserrat, a tiny British Overseas Territory in the eastern Caribbean. Stars including Paul McCartney, Elton John, Boy George, Stevie Wonder and Sting passed through this studio to record some of the biggest hits of a generation.

Seventy-six albums were made here before the studio shut its doors in 1989, when the island was devastated by a hurricane. Six years later, Montserrat took another hit when the Soufrière Hills volcano began erupting, ultimately destroying the island’s capital, Plymouth, in 1997.

Nowadays the wasp-infested building which once housed AIR is a mere shell of its former self. But for many Montserratians, it remains a symbol for what their nation used to be.

By: Ryan Shuessler

Source: The Guardian

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Ringo Starr's Liverpool home up for sale - Wednesday, January 27, 2016

BEATLE fans looking for an extra special bit of memorabilia could find themselves getting into the grove after it was announced that Ringo Starr's childhood Liverpool home is to go under the hammer.

Number 10 Admiral Grove, in the Dingle, where the teddy boy drummer lived until he was 21, is up for auction after its tenant of 37 years died last year.

Owner social landlord Plus Dane will be selling the two-up-two-down to the highest bidder at a special March auction at Liverpool's world famous Cavern Club. It has a guide price of £55,000, but auctioneers Countrywide are hoping it might attract investors with an interest in the Fab Four.

According Plus Dane, which says profits raised will be ploughed back into its housing stock in the area, the Victorian terrace was a regular haunt for the Beatles and Cilla Black in their younger days. If that wasn't enticement enough, it also points to The Empress pub, at the end of the street, which graced the cover of Ringo’s first solo album, Sentimental Journey, in 1970.

A number of restrictions have been placed on the sale of the house so it cannot become a tourist attraction or museum.

Source: Liverpool Confidential

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