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Yoko Ono received a famously chilly reception from The Beatles, but Ringo Starr said he always liked his bandmate’s wife. He was the only Beatle who flew to her side after John Lennon’s murder, and Lennon never felt the same anger toward Starr as George Harrison and Paul McCartney. Starr explained that he understood the connection between Lennon and Ono, which made him more receptive to her. He also shared what made him like Ono.Lennon and Ono met at an art gallery in 1966, when he was married to his first wife, Cynthia Lennon. They connected quickly, and Lennon soon split up with Cynthia and married Ono. The couple was famously close — Ono was a near-constant presence at Beatles recording sessions. This frustrated McCartney and Harrison, but Starr never had as much of a problem with her presence.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr established himself as a talented drummer early in his career. Then he changed drumming forever with The Beatles. He earned fame and fortune with the Fab Four, but one Beatles insider once explained how Ringo and his wife lived like simple people even after they purchased a huge estate.

Ringo moved from Liverpool to London once The Beatles made it big. England’s capital city was also the epicenter of the country’s music scene, so he vacated the working-class port town for cosmopolitan London.

The drummer shared a place with bandmate George Harrison. Then he moved to an apartment in Montagu Square, not far from Buckingham Palace. When Ringo and his wife, Maureen, were expecting their first child, they moved out of the apartment to a house near John Lennon’s residence in Weybridge outside of the city. (The two bandmates lived less than a mile apart). Yet the former Richard Starkey still held the lease, and the apartment became a playground for his famous friends.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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The Monkees’ Davy Jones was present during the recording of The Beatles’ “Revolution 1.”
Peter Tork worked on George Harrison’s first solo album, Wonderwall Music.
A writer explained why members of the Prefab Four crossed paths with the Fab Four so much.

The Monkees‘ Davy Jones was there during the recording of The Beatles’ “Revolution 1.” During an interview, a writer explained why he was present for the recording. The writer revealed the Fab Four had many connections to the Prefab Four.

Andrew Sandoval is the author of The Monkees: The Day-by-Day Story of the 60s TV Pop Sensation. During a 2021 interview with Rolling Stone, he revealed The Monkees’ Mike Nesmith spent time at John Lennon’s home while Micky Dolenz spent time at Paul McCartney’s home. “The Beatles had no reason to invite these people into their homes other than they seemed to really like them,” Sandoval said. 

Sandoval discussed other connections between the two bands. “That’s another interesting story,” he said. “Why did George Harrison get Peter Tork to play banjo on his first solo work, Wonderwall& details

John Lennon was the father of Julian Lennon — even if his fame with the Beatles impacted their relationship. Here’s what Cynthia Lennon said about John Lennon’s short trip to the hospital in her 2005 memoir. 

In 1962, John and Cynthia Lennon got married after an unexpected pregnancy. In 1963, their first child, Julian Lennon, was born. 

With Cynthia Lennon’s mother away in another country and John Lennon on tour with the Beatles, Cynthia Lennon was alone in the hospital when she gave birth to her son.

Busy with the Beatles, Lennon didn’t get a chance to visit his wife and son until 3 days after his birth. Cynthia Lennon described their reunion in her 2005 memoir, John. There were only complications because of John Lennon’s rising star power, which extended to the hospital. 

“John arranged for me to be moved into a private room; he knew that both he and I might attract unwelcome attention if I stayed in the public ward,” Cynthia Lennon wrote. “It was wonderful to see him, but privacy was impossible.” 

Source: Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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When The Beatles first formed, Pete Best served as the band’s drummer before being replaced by Ringo Starr. While all parties appeared to move forward amicably, John Lennon had some harsh feelings toward the drummer, which he shared years later. 

Best first met The Beatles at the Casbah Coffee Club, which was opened by his mother. The Beatles played several concerts there in their early days and invited Best to join the band in 1960. In an interview shared by Express, John Lennon recalled asking Best to join The Beatles on a trip to Hamburg, Germany. 

“We knew of this guy. He was living in his mother’s house that had a club in it, and he had a drum kit, so we dragged him, auditioned him, and he could keep one beat going for long enough, so we took him to Germany,” Lennon said. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Celebrities have always struggled with their perceived public image, which is always on display to their fans and critics. This seems to be the case with Paul McCartney, a member of The Beatles who recently revealed how hard it was to live with his normal self against the stereotype he had already been labeled with.

Like all other band members, Paul also earned a nickname — in his case “the Cute Beatle” — from fans, which he usually disliked.
The songwriter claimed that the only time he did not resent his moniker was when he played himself in the 1964 movie, A Hard Day’s Night.“No, I didn’t mind it. No, no; I still don’t, I was in a film. I don’t care what they picture me as,” he told Rolling Stone. “So far as I’m concerned, I’m just doing a job in a film. If the film calls for me to be a cheerful chap, well, great; I’ll be a cheerful chap.”

Source: doyouremember.com

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In 1967, The Beatles released their eighth studio album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. “With a Little Help from My Friends” is the second track of the album and was written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, with Ringo Starr on the lead vocals. The song has been covered many times, but arguably the most famous version was done by Joe Cocker. 

In 1968, Joe Cocker completely reimagined the track, inspired by the blues and soul music. “With a Little Help from My Freinds” was the title track of his debut album, which peaked at No. 35 on the Billboard 200. Cocker received help from some of his friends for the track, which features guitar lines from Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and organs from Tommy Eyre. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Before The Beatles publicly broke up, the band sent Ringo Starr as an emissary to talk to Paul McCartney. McCartney planned on releasing his solo album ahead of The Beatles’ album Let It Be. Angry, McCartney refused and threw Starr out of his house. Not long after, he publicly announced that the band had broken up. Starr said that up until this point, there had been a possibility that the band could have gotten back together.After years of increased tensions in The Beatles, John Lennon privately told his bandmates that he would be leaving the band in 1969. In 1970, McCartney made the news public. Lennon said that he first began thinking about leaving the band in 1966, when they stopped touring. 

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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From 1963 to 1970, these were the 12 UK studios albums released by The Beatles: Please Please Me, With the Beatles, A Hard Day’s Night, Beatles for Sale, Help!, Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, The White Album, Yellow Submarine, Abbey Road and Let It Be. At various different points in their lives, the Fab Four revealed their individual personal favourites of the dozen. And here is what John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr said.

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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The Beatle's 12th and final studio album, Let It Be, was released in 1970. But Formidable magazine says there is actually a 13th studio album, or at least one can be compiled from post-Beatles songs that were written before the band broke up.

Beatles fans and music lovers in general, often fantasize about what the group might have produced had they stayed together and continued making music into the '70s. Well, the truth is, They did. There is the last Beatles album published during the 70s, we just need to look for it in the right places, because it´s out there, hidden in plain sight. So here is what we did. We look into Harrison, Lennon and McCartney recorded song demos for the Beatles rejected at the time, but ultimately released later on in their solo albums. If we keep in mind they had basically stopped collaborating on songs after 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, this material would have been the natural Beatles album to follow 1970 Let it Be. Magic occurs when you place and listen to these songs in the Beatles conceptual framework.

Source: Mark Frauenfelder/boingboing.net

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"We did a lot of naughty, naughty things together" said Elton John about the Beatles legend. In a beautiful interview, Lennon's son later Sean told Elton his father "had a special love" for him.


On November 28, 1974, John Lennon made his last ever concert appearance, as a guest of Elton John at Madison Square Garden in New York. The two legends performed Whatever Gets You Thru the Night, Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, and I Saw Her Standing There. It was the culmination of an intense relationship but also marked the moment Elton would lose what they had together. Five decades later, Elton opened up about that extraordinary two-year period with his fellow music idol to Lennon's son Sean.

Source: Stefan Kyriazis/express.co.uk

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Each Beatles album has several standout songs. Not only do fans have their favorites, but The Beatles had their own standouts from what they created. There are many great songs from Abbey Road, but Paul McCartney believes the album’s biggest hit is his favorite. 

While Let it Be was the final album released by The Beatles, Abbey Road was the final record the band recorded together. Tensions were building between the band as each member was on the verge of going their separate ways. However, they still managed to create a successful album with Abbey Road with several iconic songs. 

Shortly after Abbey Road debuted, Paul McCartney had an interview with the BBC (shared by Far Out ), revealing his favorite song from the album, one that was written by John Lennon. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Despite all of the tours Paul McCartney has done in his long career, he has never spent a Christmas on the road. He’s always managed to be with family every year. That’s a Christmas miracle.

In 2015, Paul answered fans’ Christmas-related questions on his website. One fan asked, “Have you celebrated any Christmas’ on the road?”

Paul revealed that he’s never spent Christmas on the road. He said, “No! I have always tried to be off. We always kind of specified that we wanted to be home.”
The only time Paul came close to being on the road on Christmas was during his time with The Beatles, before he had a family. “We used to have a Christmas show,” Paul said. “We used to get dressed up! And actually it was really cool because it was a sort of like a panto, but with musical people. A musically packaged show but with all sorts of little Christmassy things.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr had a habit of always signing fan mail and sending it back to whoever wanted his autograph. However, he posted a video one day alerting his fans that any further fan mail would be ignored. Ringo didn’t tell his fans why he abruptly changed his mind but later explained why he no longer gave out his autograph. 

The Beatles are an iconic band, and any piece of memorabilia containing their autograph has high value. Ringo Starr often gave out his signature but abruptly stopped in 2008. He shared a video with his fans and, in the nicest way possible, told them that all future fan mail would be ignored. 

“Please, after the 20th of October, do not send fan mail to any address that you have,” Ringo stated. “Nothing will be signed after the 20th of October. If that has the date on the envelope, it’s going to be tossed. I’m warning you with peace and love. I have too much to do.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison didn’t think getting older was a reason to pack up and stop being a rock star. The former Beatle planned on going for decades, but, unfortunately, he didn’t get to.

During a 1987 interview with Entertainment Tonight, George explained that when he was a child, all he wanted to do was be in a band and play rock ‘n’ roll. Every kid wanted to do that when they were younger, but rock ‘n’ roll is for all ages.

“It’s a natural thing when you’re a kid, you want to get a guitar and be in a band,” George said. “I think rock ‘n’ roll will always go hand in hand with youth. But at the same time, and I recall John Lennon saying, ‘Don’t trust anybody over 30.’ We all get there and I don’t think it’s a reason to pack up just because you hit 40.”

Entertainment Tonight asked the former Beatle how much longer he’ll rock ‘n’ roll. “I don’t know,” he said. “Spose until I fall over.” He said if Chuck Berry could rock into his 60s, so could he.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison said releasing new music was complicated because he wasn’t competitive. How could he have competed against John Lennon and Paul McCartney in The Beatles? George didn’t want to be competitive in his solo career either. He didn’t want to promote his work like everyone else. In the early days of The Beatles, John and Paul appointed themselves the chief songwriters. Neither George nor Ringo Starr ever showed interest. However, that changed when George realized he could write a song just as good as any Lennon-McCartney tune. He wrote “Don’t Bother Me” in 1963. Eventually, George started writing more, but John and Paul gave him a two to three-tune quota per Beatles album. Despite receiving no encouragement from his bandmates, George didn’t stop writing songs, and they mounted up. He wasn’t releasing them fast enough but wasn’t confident to push.

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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After The Beatles broke up, John Lennon made it a point to include more political messaging in his music. He and Yoko Ono were antiwar advocates, and he wanted his songs to reflect this. He said he wanted to write something meaningful, unlike The Beatles’ music. Five years into his solo career, though, Lennon said that writing politics into his music had nearly ruined it.

After The Beatles broke up, the band’s former members began releasing solo albums. Lennon wanted to set himself apart from his bandmates, particularly Paul McCartney.

“John immediately went into his home recording studio, even though it was still under construction, to make a new solo album, Imagine, which he hoped would show the world where he stood in relation to the solo albums of Paul McCartney,” Lennon’s girlfriend May Pang wrote in the book Loving John.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Paul McCartney and John Lennon created a fascinating narrative when they wrote “Eleanor Rigby.” The story revolves around two characters who live tragic lives filled with loneliness. While the story is fictional, the origin behind the track has some truth and a haunting connection that McCartney discovered years later. 

“Eleanor Rigby’ is a depressing song by The Beatles, who typically write upbeat, optimistic music. In an interview with GQ, Paul McCartney said that the idea for the story of “Eleanor Rigby” was based on an old lady he knew in his hometown of Liverpool. He thought this idea of a lonely old woman would make for an intriguing character. 

“When I was really little, I lived on what we call a housing estate, which is like a project. There were a lot of old ladies,” McCartney explained. “And I enjoyed sitting down with these older ladies because they had these great stories, and in this case, about World War II. One in particular who I used to visit, and I’d go shopping for her, she couldn’t get out. So, I remember her. So, I had that figure in my mind of a sort of lonely old lady. 

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatshee details

Everyone tries their best to do a solid impression of The Beatles. All four members have unique Liverpool dialects that many people try to perfect. Some do it better than others, and Paul McCartney shared which celebrity he believes does the best impression of him. 

McCartney has one of the most distinct voices in entertainment. Many can recognize his singing voice, along with his normal speaking voice. It’s easy enough to impersonate, but it’s hard to get perfect. In an interview with the Smartless podcast, McCartney explained what many of his impersonators get wrong. 

“I don’t think they quite get it,” McCartney said. “Americans have got this sort of ‘Oh, hello, it’s Paul. Hey, how you doing?’…Generally, it’s not quite…My voice has changed. I look at old interviews with The Beatles, and it was much more Liverpool. But now I’ve lived out of Liverpool much more than I have lived in Liverpool. So, your voice changes.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/ cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr is an award-winning drummer best known as a “good-natured” member in the Beatles. He wrote original songs under the stage name, with John Lennon’s ex-wife elaborating on his choice to use a stage name. Here’s the meaning behind this artist’s alias, as noted in the 2005 memoir John. 

As the last member to join the Beatles, Ringo Starr functioned as the group’s drummer, performing on “Hey Jude,” “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “Twist and Shout,” and other hits by the rock band.

Although most listeners know him by his stage name, Ringo Starr’s birth name is Richard Starkey. When he was knighted, he also used his real name officially becoming Sir Richard Starkey.
In her 2005 memoir, Cynthia Lennon described her first impressions of the Beatles, meeting George Harrison was he was only 16 years old and only meeting Ringo Starr after she married Lennon. In John, she also shared her perspective on Ringo Starr’s name change from Richard Starkey (and the meaning behind his stage name).

Source: Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison had temporarily quit The Beatles in January 1969, disillusioned with their fraught sessions after witnessing the domestic bliss of The Band and their home studio set-up in Woodstock the previous November. What he saw in New York suggested a cooler, more democratic process was possible. The tensions in which he was mired at that time bore a handful of songs that were at once spiteful yet contemplative, including “I Me Mine” and “Wah Wah.”

“Run Of The Mill” is similarly probing; ironically, its lyrics were first scrawled across an envelope from Apple, the company that would irrevocably tear the group apart over differences of opinion regarding its management. A few weeks after Paul McCartney announced to the world in April 1970 that The Beatles had split, Harrison was in New York to discuss starting work on a solo album with Phil Spector, playing the producer “Run Of The Mill” and a selection of songs he’d earmarked for it. While the majority of “Run Of The Mill”’s ire is purportedly aimed at McCartney, the song also serves as a cautionary tale of owning one’s actions: “No one around you will carry the blame for you,” details

While there is more than a little debate about the validity of the Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour (released 11/27/67) as a bonafide long-player, the practical fact of the matter is that the ‘album’ was originally a release cobbled together by the group’s American label, Capitol Records, as a means of maximizing holiday record sales back in late 1967.

As originally issued in the Beatles’ native country on Parlophone Records, Magical Mystery Tour consisted of six cuts split between two extended play records. In the United States, those half-dozen tracks were combined with singles released subsequent to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, plus the magnificent double-A side from the previous February “Penny Lane” and “Strawberry Fields Forever”.

Source: Doug Collette/glidemagazine.com

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Before the Beatles were international superstars, John Lennon began his relationship with Cynthia Lennon. After an unexpected pregnancy with his then-girlfriend, John Lennon was “concern[ed]” about having a wife and being in a rock band. Here’s what we learned from the 2005 memoir John.

While attending college, John Lennon began his relationship with his college classmate Cynthia Lennon (then Powell). The two dated for several months, with Cynthia Lennon noting the boys’ first mini-tour — a six-week stint in Germany. 

Shortly after the Beatles added Ringo Starr to their lineup, John and Cynthia Lennon got married. This was prompted by an unexpected pregnancy, which John Lenon reacted to positively, according to his then-girlfriend. 

“Neither of us planned to have a baby, Cyn, but I love you and I’m not going to leave you now,” Cynthia Lennon recalled in her 2005 memoir, John.

Source: Julia Dzurillay/cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon was typically the most outspoken member of The Beatles. He made points his bandmates Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison would not express to the press. Lennon’s most revealing interview was given just before his December 1980 death. There, Lennon shared his opinion that fans “missed the whole point” of The Beatles’ message.

Historically, Lennon was known as the intellectual Beatle and was the most outspoken of the band’s four members. The dark-natured part of his personality often underpinned his humor. He often spoke his mind both unabashedly and in a tongue-in-cheek manner.

Lennon caused significant controversy in 1966 when he declared that the Beatles were “more popular than Jesus.” These words prompted mass burnings of The Beatles’ records in the American Bible Belt. As he further evolved as a public figure, Lennon became an anti-war activist.

Source: Lucille Barilla/cheatsheet.com

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The tape of an interview with Beatles John Lennon and Paul McCartney was left anonymously — but the borrower has nothing to fear. The library says its been "fine-free" for over a year.Good morning, I'm A Martínez. The lost is returned. In the drop box of the San Antonio Public Library, someone left a cassette tape that was checked out 44 years ago. The tape of an interview with Beatles John Lennon and Paul McCartney was left anonymously. But the borrower has nothing to fear. The library wrote on Facebook they have been fine-free for over a year. So whether it's a day late or four decades late, the library takes back stuff at no charge. Now, does anyone still have a working cassette player they can borrow? It's MORNING EDITION.

Source: NPR

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