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While The Beatles had several peaks together collectively, the band members didn’t always see it that way. Take Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which is often called the greatest album of all time. Neither George Harrison nor Ringo Starr had a great time making that record.

George described being bored by the “assembly process” the band went through during the Sgt. Pepper sessions. For his part, Ringo wasn’t thrilled about all the sitting-around the band did making the album. (He compared it to being a session musician.)

On “She’s Leaving Home,” Ringo didn’t even have a drum part to play. Overall, Sgt. Pepper was very much a Paul McCartney project. That hints at another reason Ringo didn’t enjoy making the album.

In an interview published in the Anthology project, Ringo said he generally preferred playing songs John Lennon wrote to those penned by Paul. It was a matter of the songwriters’ individual styles.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ringo, Paul, John — and Eric?! Perhaps no other band in history is quite as synonymous with the first names of its members as the Beatles. But at one point, George Harrison walked out on the band — and at the top of the list to replace him: Eric Clapton.

The guitarist first met the Fab Four when he was in the band the Yardbirds, who were a supporting act for one of their headlining shows in 1964.

That led to a connection so strong that straddled both the Beatles' professional and personal lives. Clapton didn’t just collaborate with the band as a whole, but he also played with each of the four members independently on their solo endeavors. On top of that, he became best friends with Harrison — and they even ended up sharing an ex-wife, Pattie Boyd.

Source: biography.com

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You’ll sometimes hear Beatles fans referring to a Fab Four record as “perfect.” Given the power of the songwriting, production, and individual performances, it’s not hard to understand what they mean. But from a technical standpoint, band’s recordings were far from perfect.

In some cases, The Beatles intentionally made a recording flawed. Geoff Emerick, the band’s longtime engineer, explained how it worked in the book Here, There and Everywhere. “When someone made a mistake and the others liked it, we’d often make it louder [during mixing] to accentuate it.”

On the Abbey Road album, you find an example of what Emerick was talking about on “Polythene Pam.” In the middle of that track, which was part of the Side Two medley, Paul McCartney made a mistake playing his bass part.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Collector guitars signed by rock and roll legends such as Eric Clapton and Van Halen were recently stolen from a storage unit in Daytona Beach.

“I hate thieves. They’re the worst on earth so I’m glad that he got caught and I’m excited about getting my guitar back,” Jack Baker said.

Jack Baker lives out of state and stored his precious memorabilia he bought online at the storage facility while he renovates his Florida home.

“Something in my brain told me that it would be better taking it to Hyde Park because it’s built like a fortress,” said Baker.

Officials from the Daytona Beach Police Department said the crime was reported on Dec. 20, 2019, after someone came to the unit at Hyde Park Storage Suites and noticed the eight instruments were missing. The crime likely occurred sometime between October and Dec. 17, 2019, but it’s unclear exactly when.

Source: Adrienne Cutway/clickorlando.com

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While George Harrison was working to refine his songwriting craft, he wasn’t getting much help from his bandmates in The Beatles. “I had a little encouragement from time to time, but it was very little,” George said in a 1977 interview.

Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick backs up that account in the book, Here, There and Everywhere. “In general, sessions where we did George Harrison songs were approached differently,” Emerick said. “Everybody would relax — there was a definite sense that it really didn’t matter.”

During the sessions for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), George faced more criticism than usual. It began when he introduced “Only a Northern Song” in the studio. After John Lennon didn’t play on the backing track, The Beatles decided to shelve the song for a later date.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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George and Ringo's Handwritten Lyrics - Saturday, January 11, 2020

There's a special piece of Beatles memorabilia up for sale ... handwritten lyrics to a classic song from the 'White Album' scribbled by George Harrison and Ringo Starr!!!

The lyrics to George's signature song "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" are penned on the back of a studio recording sheet, and it's going up for sale through the memorabilia company Moments in Time -- and they're hawking this slice of Beatles history for $195,000.

It's pretty cool ... the lyric sheet is a working draft used during the hit song's recording way back in 1968 at EMI Studios in London.

George started the top of the sheet by writing, "I Look at You all see the love there thats sleeping -- While my guitar gently weeps" and continued at the bottom with, "While my Guitar Gently weeps as I'm sitting here doing nothing but aging still my guitar G W."

All the writing in between is scribbled by Ringo ... including an effort to work out a misspelling on the side of the sheet.

Source: tmz.com

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The longtime friendship between Bob Dylan and The Beatles’ own George Harrison is a long one deeply entrenched in the joy of one another’s creativity. In fact, in 1992, Dylan would be the major reason for Harrison to perform for what would be one of the last times.

The legendary Quiet Beatle had been out from underneath the large shadow the Fab Four had cast for a few years now. His iconic album All Things Must Pass had ascertained Harrison his legendary status on his solo work alone but, despite all his experience, Harrison was never a big fan of touring after his 1974 tour.

The pain of that tour with Ravi Shankar had clearly landed quite heavily on Harrison and for many years, despite commercial success like his 1987 record Cloud Nine, the Quiet Beatle was, for the main part, remaining quiet.

Yet in 1990 something seemed to change, Harrison looked as if he gearing up for a tour of his own, for the first time since 1974. After sharing the stage in Los Angeles in 1990, Harrison, to seemingly dip his toe into the touring water, joined the legendary Eric Clapton for a joint tour of Japan, the next year.

Source: Jack Whatley/faroutmagazine.co.uk

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There are a lot of ‘almost’ moments in rock and roll history, one that has always hung heavily over our heads was the very real moment Saturday Night Live nearly reunited The Beatles, had John Lennon and Paul McCartney been bothered to get up from watching it on TV.

In the iconic first series of ‘Saturday Night Live’ – America’s home of alternative weekend hilarity – show’s legendary producer, Lorne Michaels set himself a fairly big challenge: to reunite The Beatles. He started as any SNL act would, with a piece direct to camera.

Whether Michaels was performing with the real intent of reuniting the most enigmatic songwriting partnership to have ever existed in Lennon and McCartney, or he was just doing a bit, he shared the sentiment of a nation. Michaels talks directly to the camera about how The Beatles had affected so many lives, “In my book, The Beatles are the best thing that ever happened to music. It goes even deeper than that — you’re not just a musical group, you’re a part of us. We grew up with you.”

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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The Beatles are some of the most widely discussed people of all time. It feels like every time John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr tied their shoes has been thoroughly documented. However, one Beatles song has remained hidden from the public for decades. Here’s what we know about the lost Beatles track “Carnival of Light.”

Of the Beatles, John is often regarded as the avant-gardist. Paul, meanwhile, is known for making more conventional music. However, The Guardian reports Paul tried his hand at experimental music with a song called “Carnival of Light.”

Barry Miles asked his friend Paul to compose music for an electronic music festival called the Million Volt Light and Sound Rave. The festival was held in 1967 at the Roundhouse Theatre in London. Little did Miles know Paul would produce one of the great pieces of rock esoterica.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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There have been some incredibly famous music stars over the years from Elvis Presley to Freddie Mercury. And, of course, surviving Beatles member Sir Paul McCartney has had to deal with the highs and lows of fame for almost 60 years. In a new interview, he revealed how he tries to put fans at ease when meeting him, but also revealed which musician he still gets nervous around himself.

Speaking with The Penguin Podcast last month, the 77-year-old said: “If I had to interview someone famous tomorrow, I’d be like thinking about it all night and all morning, ‘oh my god what am I gonna do?’

“And I imagine that’s what they’re going through and normally you can see this bit of fear in the eyes or there’s shaking.

“So I like to put people at ease and say, ‘Look, it doesn’t matter [about calling me Sir Paul], I’m just some guy.’

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

 

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