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 He was the first to guide an X-rated film to the top of the Oscar heap, introduced the Beatles to Hollywood with “Hard Day’s Night” and “Help!” and convinced a reluctant Ian Fleming that, yes, James Bond might fare pretty well as a cinematic character.

A third-generation movie man, David V. Picker was a studio chief at United Artists, Columbia and Paramount in a prestigious run of box-office successes including “Last Tango in Paris” and “Ordinary People.”

Despite the accolades and the Oscars, Picker was quick to remind admirers that his career would likely have turned out the same even if he’d rejected the movies he helped bring to the movie houses of America and greenlighted those he’d kicked to the curb.

“My career would have probably turned out the same,” he wrote in “Musts, Maybes and Nevers: A Book About the Movies,” his 2013 memoir.

Source: Steve Marble/latimes.com

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Nowhere Boy, the 2009 biopic that starred Aaron Taylor-Johnson as the young John Lennon, is being developed for the stage.

Producers Brian Lee and Dayna Bloom of AF Creative Media and Robyn Goodman and Josh Fielder of Aged in Wood announced the project on Monday.

The musical play is inspired by the film about Lennon's adolescence in Liverpool and his complex relationships with his aunt, Mimi Smith, who raised him, and his mother, Julia Lennon, who abandoned him as a child. The story traces his initial steps into the music world and the creation in 1956 of his first band, The Quarrymen, which was joined a year later by Paul McCartney.

The feature directing debut of photographer and video artist-turned-filmmaker Sam Taylor-Johnson (then Sam Taylor-Wood), the movie was written by Matt Greenhalgh, who also wrote the 2007 music film Control, about Joy Division frontman Ian Curtis.

Source: Hollywood Reporter

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By 1969, The Beatles had much more than Yoko Ono to worry about. The previous year, John Lennon and Paul McCartney nearly got into a fistfight while recording The White Album.

Lennon’s disdain for “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” was the occasion for that episode in what had become a fractured relationship. But George Harrison had also nearly fought John over some comments he made about the band’s finances in the papers.

Meanwhile, John was insisting Allen Klein take over management for the band. After George and Ringo sided with John in that matter, it pitted all three Beatles against Paul. In other words, it was only a matter of time before the band parted ways.

That left George with something to prove as a solo artist. The years of taking a backseat to the Lennon-McCartney empire were done. Once he scored his first hit album, there was basically no way The Beatles could get back together.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Late in the brilliant run of The Beatles, the band members had pretty much had it with one another. Geoff Emerick, the recording engineer on The White Album, told the story of John Lennon getting driven mad by the endless takes needed to produce “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.”

By then, John was absolutely fed up with what he called Paul McCartney’s “granny music.” Once John went solo, he told the world how he felt on “How Do You Sleep?” In that takedown tune, he describes Paul’s solo work as “Muzak to my ears” while reeling off other insults.

Still, the band found ways to make Abbey Road and Let It Be, The Beatles’ final studio releases. Despite the animosity and regular confrontations over business matters, the four band members still had the sort of chemistry that allowed them to take the world by storm in ’64.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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It took a lot more than Yoko Ono to break up The Beatles. In fact, you can argue the show could have gone on had Paul McCartney agreed to the manager (i.e., Allen Klein) his three bandmates decided they wanted for the group. But there was almost no chance he would.

Paul’s pick for manager was the father of Linda Eastman, his future wife. So the Fab Four had serious business disagreements by early 1969. And they never ended up settling them.

After more rounds of bickering, recording, and releasing hit albums, The Beatles announced they’d parted ways in April 1970. Soon enough, you could hear John Lennon knocking around his old songwriting partner in song. (George Harrison and Ringo would get in some shots as well.)

But that doesn’t mean they didn’t miss each other. In fact, John went on the record several times talking about that special thing The Beatles had when they were in a recording studio together.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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When most people picture John Lennon and Yoko Ono, they imagine the pair ensconced in bed together as part of their “Bed-In for Peace” during the Vietnam war. Or they envision the couple’s iconic wedding picture where they stand together in matching white outfits looking every bit the part of young, in love, and full of hope for the future.

There’s no denying that John Lennon and Yoko Ono had an intense and epic love story. But their union was also plagued by controversy stemming from the opinions of friends, family members, and strangers alike. Maybe love isn’t enough to conquer all.

Why was Lennon’s and Ono’s romance so controversial? There are several reasons.

 

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Macca says that even today he enjoys writing and coming up with strong melodies.

The Grammy winner, whose Freshen Up tour hits the US next month, said: “Looking back, me and John writing does amaze me. We wrote something just short of 300 songs.

“Often when I am singing in concert, I think, ‘How did I come up with that line?’

“I do think of a 24-year-old kid and I think, ‘The kid is good’ – but the kid is me. I have to pinch myself and go, ‘This is still you’.”

Reflecting on his writing partnership with Lennon, Macca said: “I would go to his house, he would come to mine and every single time we sat down, we came away with a song. The closest to failure was Drive My Car but we pulled it out.

Source: James Desborough/express.co.uk

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Jim Irsay owns more than just the Indianapolis Colts. Ethan May, IndyStar

Jim Irsay's pricey collection of music memorabilia just got bigger.

The Indianapolis Colts owner tweeted Saturday morning that he is now the steward of the piano John Lennon used to compose songs for the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album.

Why Jim Irsay spent $2.4M: On a manuscript with pencil scrawls in the margins

"I’m elated to now be the steward of John’s “Sgt. Pepper” upright piano," Irsay tweeted. "It’s a responsibility I take seriously, with future generations in mind. #GettingThemBackTogether #Beatles"

I’m elated to now be the steward of John’s “Sgt. Pepper” upright piano. It’s a responsibility I take seriously, with future generations in mind. #GettingThemBackTogether#Beatles

Source: Andrew Clark, Indianapolis Star/indystar.com

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When The Beatles landed in the U.S. for the band’s first tour, they were nearly as young and innocent as they seemed. They just topped the Billboard charts with “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and had “She Loves You” (yeah, yeah, yeah) coming soon.

Meanwhile, their passports wouldn’t get one Beatle into a New York bar these days. Lead guitarist George Harrison was still 20 years old on February 7, 1964. Ringo Starr, the elder statesman of the group, wouldn’t turn 24 until late in the summer.

Paul McCartney and John Lennon landed in the middle of their bandmates on the age scale. Even though they’d go from singing “Love Me Do” to being “so lonely” they “wanna die” by the time they broke up, not many years had passed.

In fact, none of The Beatles had reached the age of 30 when the band split up in spring 1970.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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After the breakup of The Beatles, we got to see what the band members thought about each other’s music. In the case of John Lennon, it’s safe to say he didn’t find much to like in the solo works of old bandmate Paul McCartney.

“That sound you make is Muzak to my ears,” John sang in a brutal 1971 takedown of his former songwriting partner. Ringo wasn’t impressed by Paul’s work, either. “Everything you try to do, you know it sure sounds wasted,” Ringo sang in 1972.

While those critiques of Paul might sound harsh, it was nothing compared to what the critics were saying. By the time Paul partnered up with his wife Linda and formed Wings, reviews of his first two albums ranged from unimpressed to downright scathing.

The beatings at the hand of rock critics really kicked in with Wild Life (1972).

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Which Beatle Had The Best Hair in 1968