Search
Filters
Close
RSS

Beatles News

Express.co.uk readers are thoroughly discerning and have made their decision on which is the best Beatles album. Various magazines have ranked the Beatles albums in the past, and there is often a fight among the top three. However, the winner of our Express.co.uk poll is quite surprising, leaving one of these three completely out of the running.

According to Express.co.uk readers, Revolver is the best Beatles album.

The album received 18 percent of the votes, and truly split fans as they threw their weight behind different albums.

This is quite a surprise, given this album was not the favourite of any Beatles members, most famously John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

In a 1971 interview with Rolling Stone, Lennon said one of his favourite albums was The White Album, and gave a pretty harsh reason as to why.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

 

It's been well over fifty years since Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band first hit the airwaves on both sides of the Atlantic.

It's been well over fifty years since Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band first hit the airwaves on both sides of the Atlantic.

The frantic screaming of their fans at every concert and the lack of stage monitors made it nearly impossible for them to hear themselves as a musical unit, so they took a step back and rethought the direction in which they were musically heading towards. Ringo Starr often mentioned that were becoming a "bunch of loose musicians" while John Lennon remarked "send out four waxworks ... and that would satisfy the crowds. Beatles concerts have nothing to do with music anymore."

In addition, John's remark "The Beatles are more popular than Jesus" in a London newspaper in March 1966 invited a far-reached public outcry wherever they performed. Their 1966 Philippines tour ended in disaster when they unknowingly snubbed the First Lady Imelda Marcos. By August 1966, The Beatles unanimously felt that their touring days are over, and performed their last concert together at Candlestick Park in San Francisco on 29th August 1966.

Source:Jef details

George Martin used to quibble over whether "The Ballad of John and Yoko" was even a Beatles song. What's certain, however, is this: Without it, the group might never have rebounded from the crushing disappointment of Let It Be to complete Abbey Road.

"It was hardly a Beatle track," Martin said in Anthology. "It was a kind of thin end of the wedge, as far as they were concerned. John [Lennon] had already mentally left the group anyway, and I think that was just the beginning of it all."

Something happened on April 14, 1969, however, as Lennon and Paul McCartney worked feverishly to complete this new track: The scars from their most recent sessions began to heal. Martin was back at the helm, after stepping aside for Phil Spector on Let It Be. Engineer Geoff Emerick also returned after having departed during sessions for 1968's White Album.

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

Read More<<<

details

On the late albums by The Beatles, you could tell who wrote which song by who was singing. If Paul McCartney had the lead vocal, there was a 100% chance he wrote the track. (On The White Album, Paul might be playing drums and guitar, too.)

The same applied to songs by John Lennon and George Harrison. Even Ringo Starr sang the one tune he wrote on Abbey Road, the Fab Four’s last recorded album. But in the early days, when John and Paul wrote so many songs “eyeball to eyeball,” it was much trickier.

When then band recorded its first two albums, John and Paul were writing songs that might feature any of the four Beatles singing the lead. And Paul might step in to sing a section even when John wrote the entire track himself.

Source: cheatsheet.com

Read More<<<

details

As a member of the Beatles and as a solo artist, Paul McCartney is a world-class musician. To reach great artistic heights, he was inevitably inspired by other artists. Some fans might be surprised to know that he was inspired by Taylor Swift.

Paul’s latest album is called Egypt station. He presents a song called “Who Cares” which is inspired by Swift’s public life. Plus, Swift has a lot to say about Paul.
How Taylor Swift inspired “Who Cares”

Many of Paul’s most famous post-Beatles songs, from “Silly Love Songs” to “Wonderful Christmastime”, are very dynamic and upbeat. “Who Cares” is no exception. However, it has more of a rock side than most Paul hits from the 80s.

“Who Cares” is not like a Swift song. Despite this, he was directly influenced by Swift and his young fans. Paul told the BBC, “I was actually thinking of Taylor Swift and her relationship with her young fans and how it is sort of a fraternal thing. And I imagined talking to one of these young fans and saying, “Have you ever been bullied? Are you being bullied? »»

Source: oltnews.com

details

After a career that’s spanned 50 years, Jimmy Buffett has a good idea what his albums should sound like. But after a seven-year gap before his new LP, Life on the Flip Side, which came out today, he had the benefit of receiving advice from Paul McCartney on how to bring the best out of its 14 songs.

Buffett, like many other artists, planned the release to coincide with a tour, but the coronavirus pandemic has shut down those plans, meaning he’s at home during the summer for the first time in 44 years.

“You hear all about people running out of material later in life because a lot of them don't make it this far with a career,” he told Billboard in a new interview. “I’ve heard a lot about writer's block, but I've never had that problem, 'cause I figure as a traveling man and as a nomad, you run into so many more stories than you can possibly imagine, and the source is always there and it always has been for me.”

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

Read More<<<

details

Elvis Presley and The Beatles are the most successful music acts of all time. And while the Fab Four sold more records that The King, they’ve admitted over the years how much they were influenced by Elvis growing up as kids in the fifties. Sir Paul McCartney only made his first visit to Graceland in 2013, where he honoured The King in the most touching way.

Graceland’s official Instagram account have reposted The Beatles legend’s picture from his visit.

Captioned “Paying Respects #OutThere at #Graceland”, the photo sees Sir Paul leaning over Elvis’ grave in the Meditation Garden.

Graceland wrote of the event: “May 26, 2013: Sir Paul McCartney made his first visit to #Graceland during the Memphis stop of his Out There tour.

“The #Beatles legend placed a personal guitar pick on Elvis' grave and said it was ‘so Elvis can play in heaven.’”

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

Read More<<<

details

Dehradun is a quaint little town in the lap of Himalayas. The place that is known for its beautiful mountains, its serene views and great boarding schools, has also been visited by the world-renowned band, The Beatles and they fell in love with it.

How do we know that? George Harrison, a member of The Beatles, wrote a song Dehradun, which never officially released. But the song is available in Harrison's voice on YouTube. Acclaimed author Amitav Ghosh recently discovered the song and tweeted the video. He is also in love Dehradun and has studied in one of those renowned boarding schools.

An alumnus of The Doon School, the writer of The Hungry Tide shared the George Harrison song with the caption, "Just discovered that George Harrison wrote a song about the town where I went to school - Dehra Dun. (sic)"

Source: Amitav Ghosh/indiatoday.in

Read More<<<

details

If “1970 in Beatles history” conjures mental images of a miserable-looking John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr sitting around playing The Long and Winding Road in a dark, depressing studio, you’re missing out, my friends.

First of all, all those long faces seen in the band’s 1970 film, Let It Be, were filmed in early 1969. During the bulk of ’70, all four Beatles were diving head first into their brand-new solo careers, and it was an exciting, fun time for all involved - fans included. That energy comes through in the dynamic guitar work of all three Beatles guitarists on their debut solo albums - and let’s not forget that Ringo was hangin’ with some serious pickers himself.

Here are nine studio albums that explain exactly what John, Paul, George and Ringo (and his guitarists) were up to in that crazy year we call 1970. The albums are organized by release date. Enjoy!

Source: guitarworld.com

Read More<<<

details

During their run together in the The Beatles, John Lennon and Paul McCartney didn’t just write songs they sang themselves. Along the way, the famed songwriting team passed off songs to Peter and Gordon, The Rolling Stones, and, of course, fellow Beatle Ringo Starr.

While most music fans know “With a Little Help My Friends” is a Lennon-McCartney song featuring Ringo on vocals, it’s easy to overlook songs bearing the same songwriting credit that went to George Harrison in the Fab Four’s early years.

That’s because George became famous for writing his own material, including classics such as “Something” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” But George’s run as a songwriter didn’t start until August ’63.

By then, The Beatles’ busy schedule was already kicking into gear. As of 1964, they had to record multiple albums per year. So for A Hard Day’s Night John and Paul wrote one to keep a spot on the record for George.

Source: entertainment--news.com

Read More<< details

Beatles Radio Listener Poll
What Beatles Era do you like better?