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For his 50th birthday this year, Joe Boucher’s wife took him to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. This past summer, on the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, he went to the music festival site in upstate New York, stood where the stage had been and imagined what it was like.

He’s walked in the crosswalk at Abbey Road and stood on the stage at the Cavern Club, where the Beatles started out in Liverpool. Rock ‘n’ roll is part of his DNA, culturally and otherwise. “I am the youngest of five kids, and I grew up with a good classic-rock pedigree,” said Boucher, concert manager for the Portland Symphony Orchestra and an ardent Beatles fan.

A musician who spent years on the road in rock bands, Boucher is writing the second act of his musical story by creating orchestral rock shows and shares his passion for the Beatles with “Imagine: The Beatles Solo Years,” at 7 p.m. Friday at the Sanford Performing Arts Center, an 850-seat theater that opened a year ago in Sanford High School.

Source: Bob Keyes/pressherald.com

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Most of the stories of the White Album sessions are dark. There’s the one about Ringo feeling so unwanted he left the country while recording “Back in the USSR.” Or how George Harrison brought in Eric Clapton so the other Beatles would pay attention to a song he wrote.

Paul McCartney famously referred to this record as “the tension album,” and the selfishness of the band members was a big part of that. According to just about everyone there, you’d only see a Beatle get excited when recording one of his own songs. Otherwise, it was every man for himself.

But there were exceptions. Before “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” became a sore spot for all parties, the Fab Four had a grand old time goofing around doing the backing vocals. And, judging by Beatles quotes, it sounds like they also had fun recording “Happiness Is a Warm Gun.”

After they’d finished the record, Paul described that John Lennon-penned classic as a highlight of The White Album. In fact, he went out of his way to describe how much he loved “Happiness.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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What would’ve happened if George Harrison hadn’t returned to The Beatles in January 1969? That’s been a fascinating topic ever since George took his leave from the band during the sessions for Let It Be.

For John Lennon, George’s departure didn’t represent the end of the world. “Let’s get in Eric [Clapton],” he said calmly. “He’s just as good and not such a headache.” To reinforce the point, John (always ready to burn someone) began playing The Who’s “A Quick One, While He’s Away.”

But it wouldn’t be that simple. For starters, Paul McCartney and Ringo didn’t agree to call in Clapton as a replacement for George. And that wasn’t the only thing keeping one of the era’s guitar gods from joining the Fab Four.

If John bothered to run it by Clapton, he probably would have gotten a “no” in reply. By early ’69, George and Clapton had already solidified what would become a lifelong friendship.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The following extract from the book describes George Harrison’s budding involvement with The Beatles as a key songwriter; and how after a few false starts he would cement this role with Here Comes The Sun. When George Harrison unveiled his latest composition, “Here Comes the Sun,” it was much to the delight of his bandmates. With songs like The White Album’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” and, more recently, “Something,” Harrison had finally proven his mettle as a songwriter of the highest order. For Lennon, “Something” had been a revelation. As he later recalled, “Paul and I really carved up the empire between us, because we were the singers. George didn’t even used to sing when we brought him into the group. He was a guitarist. And for the first few years he didn’t sing on stage. We maybe let him do one number, like we would with Ringo.” By the time Harrison started his life as a working songwriter, “there was an embarrassing period where his songs weren’t that good,” Lennon added, “and nobody wanted to say anything, but we all worked on them—like we did on Ringo’s. I mean, we put more work into those songs details

Before he founded Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page was a very busy man on the London recording scene. In fact, he was one of the top session guitarists of the era. During the mid-1960s, he played the solo on Donovan’s “Sunshine Superman” as well as rhythm guitar on records by The Who and The Kinks.

And when Joe Cocker’s take on “With a Little Help From My Friends” shot to No. 1 in ’69, it went there with Page’s searing lead guitar. Basically, if a producer wanted any sort of guitar work without having to prep the player, he could call Page, who’d get the job done.

That included recordings for film scores. So when Parlophone chief George Martin needed incidental music recorded for a film starring his hot new act, Page got the call. But it wasn’t a situation where Martin wanted to use a session musician over one of The Beatles (as he’d done in the past).

Source: cheatsheet.com

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For those who ever wished to see Jamie Oliver and Lil Nas X sharing a canvass, right now is your fortunate day

The long-lasting art work for The Beatles‘ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Membership Band’ album cowl has been up to date for the 21st century, with a wide range of fashionable musicians, celebrities and popular culture figures included on the newly designed piece.

The art work was designed by German artist TrippieSteff as a part of a remake of a number of basic album covers, together with Blondie’s ‘Parallel Lines’ and Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’, by a crew of graphic designers and artists.

The brand new art work, which options Taylor Swift, Kanye West, Drake and Lil Nas X rather than the unique Fab 4 on the centre, depicts a spread of up to date figures together with Elon Musk, Kylie Jenner, Bernie Sanders and BoJack Horseman. See the brand new design under.

Source: heraldpublicist.com

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In early June 1966, The Rolling Stones ruled the airwaves on both sides of the Atlantic with “Paint It Black.” That track, which hit No. 1 on the Billboard and UK charts, featured a driving rhythm and a sitar part played by Brian Jones.

But The Beatles weren’t looking to their purported rivals for inspiration as they recorded Revolver in April-June ’66. A year earlier, George Harrison wrote a song that reflected the influence of The Byrds (“If I Needed Someone”) for Rubber Soul. (George played sitar on that ’65 album as well.)

Meanwhile, Paul McCartney was hitting a peak during the Revolver sessions with ballads like “For No One” and “Here, There and Everywhere.” And on “Good Day Sunshine, the album’s bounciest song, Paul looked to another American band for inspiration.

On that short and sweet track, Paul said he had The Lovin’ Spoonful in mind. But Paul didn’t play the barroom-style piano on “Good Day Sunshine.” Those honors went to the best pianist in the studio that day.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Compared to other Beatles records, The White Album was a bona fide avalanche of material. With four sides and over 93 minutes of music and effects, it was over three times as long as A Hard Day’s Night and nearly an hour longer than Revolver.

Speaking not long after its release, George Harrison said it was so long it could be overwhelming. “It’s too big for people to really get into it,” George commented. “For the reviewers and also [fans].”

But fans of John Lennon couldn’t help but celebrate. On the double-record release, you get 11 tracks featuring John’s writing and 10 with him on lead vocal. And from “Dear Prudence” on Side One to “Revolution 1” on Side Four, it was John at or near his best.

Among John’s tracks were Ringo’s favorite from the album (“Yer Blues”) and one both George and Paul McCartney greatly admired (“Happiness Is a Warm Gun”). With “Happiness Is a Warm Gun,” we got a song only John Lennon could have written — and one he called “a history of rock ‘n’ roll.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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You know when someone asks your thoughts on something, like getting bangs or starting a podcast, and it sounds like they shouldn’t do it but you don’t have the heart to tell them? That’s how Paul McCartney felt when screenwriter Richard Curtis first approached him about the movie Yesterday, which posits a world in which the Beatles never existed. (We can’t blame him!) In a new interview with Billboard, McCartney says, “Richard Curtis, who [directed] Love Actually, wrote to me with the idea. And I thought, This is a terrible idea, but I couldn’t tell him so I said, ‘Well, that sounds interesting — good luck.’ I didn’t think anything more of it.” Then, when McCartney found out Danny Boyle was tied to the project, he thought, They must think they can pull it off.

Source: Justin Curto/vulture.com

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Over the years, it has become common for people to think Ringo Starr isn’t talented. To legitimize this viewpoint, many have pointed to the time John Lennon was allegedly told Ringo was the best drummer in the world. According to Snopes.com, John supposedly responded “The best drummer in the world? Ringo wasn’t even the best drummer in the Beatles!” Did John actually make this callous remark?The alleged quote would not have become popular if didn’t reinforce people’s preconceived notions of Ringo. It is true Beatles records rarely featured songwriting from the band’s drummer. Some of the only Beatles tracks written by Ringo are the forgotten instrumental song “Flying” and the cutesy children’s song “Octopus’s Garden.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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