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Ringo Starr’s great drumming and affable personality earned him a place in the musical pantheon, but even legends misfire from time to time. On his third album Ringo, Starr included a cover of the song “You’re Sixteen.” The content of this song wasn’t as glaringly problematic when it was released, but the notion of an adult man signing about the beauty of an adolescent girl only gets creepier with time. The incorporation of a young Carrie Fisher into the promotion of the song is also uncomfortable, given the significant difference in age between her and Starr. Released in 1973, Ringo is a notable record for several reasons. It is one of the few occasions where all four of the Beatles collaborated on the same project, albeit on different songs. It was also the commercial peak of Starr’s solo career.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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George Harrison said The Rutles “liberated” him from The Beatles‘ legacy. For most of his solo career, George had to deal with being tied to his famous former band. He grew sick of it fast.

However, the parody helped George come to terms with The Beatles.

In 1975, Eric Idle and Neil Innes created a sketch that followed a fictional band based on The Beatles called The Rutles. The sketch appeared on Idle’s BBC television series Rutland Weekend Television later that year. Then, the fake band became real when they recorded Beatle-y songs for an album called The Rutland Weekend Songbook.

In 1976, Idle played clips of The Rutles on SNL. The producer of the late-night comedy show, Lorne Michaels, liked the sketch and agreed to produce The Rutles‘ movie, All You Need Is Cash, with Idle. The Rutles line-up included Ron Nasty (Innes), Dirk McQuickly (Idle), Stig O’Hara (Ricky Fataar), and Barry Wom (John Halsey).

Source: Hannah Wigandt/cheatsheet.com

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When the Beatles started work on their masterpiece Revolver, in April 1966, they knew they were after the sound of the future. And they got there on the very first day of the sessions, with the wildly experimental buzz of “Tomorrow Never Knows (Take 1).” The psychedelic outtake was released on Friday and it’s a taste of the new Super Deluxe Edition of Revolver, which arrives on October 28. The new edition tells the story of how the Beatles took their gigantic creative leap into the unknown. As producer Giles Martin says, “It’s the Beatles punching their way out of a bag. They’re saying, ‘We’re no longer going to be constrained by anything.’”

Source: Rob Sheffield/yahoo.com

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Paul McCartney has been writing songs since he was a teenager and making money with his music for more than 60 years. Macca had an easy time writing songs with John Lennon in The Beatles. He found new artists to collaborate with when the band broke up, but Paul said once got a bit defensive when Michael Jackson asked to work with him.A photo of him and John Lennon he saw later reminded Paul he wasn’t the villain of The Beatles’ split, but he didn’t necessarily believe that at the time. His relationship with John was so strong that he has dreams that sound like nightmares with Lennon in them. Still, he didn’t hesitate to form a new band not long after the Fab Four broke up.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr was a late addition to The Beatles.
Ringo Starr said that he was angry for a long time after the band broke up.
Years after The Beatles broke up, Ringo Starr said he has calmed down.

Ringo Starr spent years of his life dedicated to The Beatles and found it difficult to cope after the band broke up. He explained that for two decades, he stewed about the end of the band and tried to cope with it using alcohol. He said that because of this, many of his post-Beatle years are a blur to him. These days, though, Starr says he’s dedicated himself to his health.

Starr joined The Beatles in 1962, replacing the original drummer, Pete Best. His bandmates quickly realized that he would be a good fit in the group.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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The British Library will be exhibiting the expanded archive of Hunter Davies, the only approved biographer of The Beatles.

Building upon Davies’ 2013 donations to the library, the collection will include “notebooks he used during conversations, photos and sketches” from his time spent working on The Beatles’ biography. There will also be a chance to see “Super 8 movie footage filmed by Hunter while on holiday with Paul and Linda McCartney”.

“The further we get from The Beatles, the bigger they become,” explains Davies. “I never thought all these years later my scruffy notebooks would be of such interest – and I’m pleased that they’ll be made available to a wider audience of Beatles fans and researchers through the British Library”.

Source: Kelly Doherty/thevinylfactory.com

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George Harrison had a reputation as the Quiet Beatle, but he wasn’t afraid to show his sense of humor, as a Beatles producer quickly learned. George Martin, a producer who worked with the band for years, took some convincing to recognize that Harrison was a valuable part of the group. This could have been due in part to a snarky comment Harrison made to him early on in their relationship.

“The best thing I can say to people that are curious about that is George was probably everything that you thought he was, and then some more,” Tom Petty told NPR. “Very funny man; he could just kill me with his humor. He was a great guy and I miss him terribly.”

Keith Richards also said that he appreciated Harrison’s humor.

“So George and I always used to have that thing of, ‘Well, how’s your end holding up?’ He was a very quiet and enigmatic guy in many ways,” he told Rolling Stone in 2001. “He had a very sly sense of humor, very quiet. But there was always this unspoken bond between us.”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Paul McCartney has been a working musician for so long that it’s hard to remember that he and The Beatles were once new to the game. The Beatles got a lucky break playing on The Ed Sullivan Show and soon became internationally famous. They started playing in front of massive crowds in arenas and stadiums, but Paul still got nervous about performing one song on the Sullivan show in 1965.

The beauty of the internet is that any musician can release a song or album and start building an audience. The Fab Four had to cultivate a following the old-fashioned way — by playing live.

The Beatles spent years playing concerts to build their audience. Paul, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, and John Lennon honed their chops with residencies in Hamburg, Germany, in the early 1960s. When they weren’t entertaining the Germans, the Fab Four played shows across the U.K.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles may have split up in 1970 after many growing personal feuds and arguments permeated their lives, but they were not always at one anothers' throats. In the early 1960s, the Fab Four were a tight-knit team and strong friends who worked hard, played hard, and spent all their time together.

Ringo Starr recently opened up about how one recurring argument almost got out of hand while on tour, but the musicians worked through it by being honest about their actions.

Ringo revealed that, during The Beatles' early days in the UK, they would travel across the country packed into one van with their musical equipment.

These uncomfortable journeys were no doubt stressful for a number of reasons. But it was the dynamic between the band that got them through the tougher times.

However, rage exploded between the band when someone passed wind in the tiny space. Yes, The Beatles had full-blown arguments over farts.

Source: Callum Crumlish/express.co.uk

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A few weeks ago, a 1958 Gibson Les Paul with quite the backstory went up for auction.

The electric guitar in question had once been purchased by none other than George Harrison, as a ransom payment of sorts for the safe return of another Les Paul, the Beatle's beloved '57 "Lucy" model.

Now, via Heritage Auctions (opens in new tab), the '58 "ransom" Les Paul has reportedly been sold for an impressive $312,500 (opens in new tab), well over its original opening bid of $250,000.
After playing a significant role on the Beatles' White Album, Let It Be, and Abbey Road, Lucy – which, before Harrison, had been in the possession of the Lovin’ Spoonful’s John Sebastian, Rick Derringer, and Eric Clapton – was stolen from Harrison's Beverly Hills home during a 1973 burglary and sold to Whalin's Sound City music store on Sunset Blvd.

Source: Jackson Maxwell/guitarplayer.com

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