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While Beatles fans learned the band split up in April 1970, the four members of the group had already gone their separate ways. That’s how Paul McCartney managed to release his own album before Let It Be (the Fab Four’s last) hit record stores that year.

Paul’s debut album, which John Lennon dismissed as “rubbish,” nonetheless found plenty of fans. It hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart in May and stayed there until Let It Be bumped it from the top spot after a few weeks.

Later in the year, fans got a look at what the two other major songwriters in the group had to offer on their own. George Harrison, who delivered the triple-disc All Things Must Pass in November, came next.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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A new exhibit, set in the early '60s, will transport visitors back to the time when Beatlemania was all the rage.

"Ladies and Gentlemen...The Beatles!" will debut at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on Friday, May 10.

“It doesn’t take a hard day’s night of thinking to understand the impact that The Beatles had on the history of music and popular culture,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. “The Oregon Historical Society is excited to bring to Portland this fun, interactive exhibition celebrating the band that forever changed rock and roll.”

Source: Destiny Johnson/kgw.com

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Paul McCartney's brother addresses claims of singer’s death

Despite being one of the most well-known singers of his generation, a select few Beatles fans believe Macca died way back in 1966.

The legend goes that McCartney was killed in a car crash and was replaced by a lookalike.

The band – conspiracists claim – then left hidden clues in their albums which revealed the truth.

Yesterday And Today is one such album that sparked a frenzy and the conspiracy surrounding it has re-emerged ahead of an auction of a £125k copy on May 9.

Source: Simon Green/dailystar.co.uk

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The Beatles legend Paul McCartney’s official web site published a recent article about Paul McCartney & Wings song My Carnival.

Paul McCartney stated that he admitted that the bass line of the song was very ‘Professor Longhair-styled but he said that He also talked with Professor Longhair about the song.

Here is what he said:

“I just loved the style so much that I composed something called ‘My Carnival’ and it’s got the same riff, basically, that he plays… I just couldn’t play it as well! But it’s the bass line definitely [sings Professor Longhair-style bass line].

It was very similar. So I thought, well I can’t just rip him off and have him find out about it and think, “Oh, he’s just ripped me off!”

So I’ll invite him to the session and be honest about it! So I did and said: “Hey listen, you’ve totally influenced me, but I’ve done this song.'”

Source: Enes K./metalheadzone.com

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“You know, in 1973, Ringo Starr hit #1 on the Billboard charts with the song ‘You’re Sixteen (You’re Beautiful, And You’re Mine),’ and it was a remake of an earlier song. He was thirtysomething at the time, singing about a 16-year-old. Do you want to take away Ringo Starr’s achievement?”

That was Breitbart editor Joel Pollak, talking on CNN in 2017. At the time, Roy Moore was running for Senator, staying in the race even after multiple women came forward with stories about him dating children when he was an adult. Pollak was trying to make the case for why that wasn’t such a big deal. CNN host Chris Cuomo reacted with total disbelief, and the clip went lightly viral, just like so many other clips of right-wing pundits saying outrageous bullshit on news stations.

Even running as a Republican in Alabama, Roy Moore lost. Maybe everyone in Alabama just wanted to take away Ringo Starr’s achievement.

Source: Tom Breihan/stereogum.com

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If you read about the breakup of The Beatles, it’s impossible to ignore the various hostilities among the band members. The feud between John Lennon and Paul McCartney always attracted the most interest, but there were others.

In the Let It Be documentary, you see a particularly testy exchange between Paul and George Harrison in early ’69. George also had problems with John, who wasn’t giving George’s songs the respect they warranted. All this ended up with George quitting the band, and it took some doing to bring him back.

However, you never see anyone warring with Ringo Starr. Though Ringo left the group for a spell during the White Album sessions, he didn’t seem to have personal beefs with other band members. In fact, while trying to get George back into the group, Ringo’s house was the site for negotiations.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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In early 1969, several weeks after the release of their classic double album The Beatles — better known as The White Album — rock’s most important and iconic band stood on the verge of self-destruction, consumed by outside interests, legal conflicts, and simple boredom. Bass player and songwriter Paul McCartney came up with an idea that he believed, or at least hoped, would allow the band to “get back” to their earliest days in the late 1950s and early ’60s, when they were simply a hard-working rock and roll band that did its best work performing live, as Ultimate Classic Rock recounts.

Source: Jonathan Vankin/inquisitr.com

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After nearly a decade of making great music together, John Lennon clearly got sick of Paul McCartney, and vice versa. For John, there was only so much “She’s Leaving Home” he could take. On Paul’s side, listening to Yoko Ono scream into a mic during recording sessions was driving him nuts.

Once The Beatles broke up, John and Paul took to song to express their annoyance with each another. Paul sang that John took “his lucky break” and “broke it in two.” He saw John’s prospects with his new partner as bleak. “Now what can be done for you?” he asked in “Too Many People.”

In response, John dispensed with politeness and described Paul as “dead,” someone who made “Muzak” and lived among the squares. Meanwhile, the two spiced up their musical battles with plenty of insults in the rock press.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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A car number plate once belonging to George Harrison that was first sold in return for free haircuts could fetch thousands of pounds when it is sold at auction.

The number plate KMT 499C was removed from an Aston Martin DB5 once owned by the late Beatle.

It is part of a collection of rare Harrison memorabilia being sold by Wiltshire-based auctioneers Gardiner Houlgate at its June specialist guitar and music sale.

Also included are a series of letters written by the guitarist, his sister and his sister-in-law.

The number plate is believed to have been taken off the car by a mechanic at Arnold G. Wilson Limited’s Regent Street dealership in Leeds in the early 1970s.

It was one of two plates being replaced with new style reflective plates while the car was being serviced.

The rear number plate remained at the dealership for several years until a member of staff sold it to a local barber, who collected car memorabilia, in return for free haircuts for life.

Source: BT

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The Beatles wrote many of the greatest songs of all time, and they also wrote a lot of the greatest movie songs. To know that, all you have to do is see the title sequence of “A Hard Day’s Night,” which electrifies you from its opening THRUM!!!, or the Beatles blasting the sonic bliss of “I Should Have Known Better” from inside a train storage compartment, or the smoky sublimity of the “You’re Going to Lose That Girl” recording-studio sequence from “Help!,” or the melting psychedelia of the “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” fantasia from “Yellow Submarine,” or Paul gazing into the camera as he delivers the hymn-like rapture of the title song of “Let It Be.” The Beatles showed you, over and over, what a pop musical movie sequence could be, and that’s why you can go back to those movies — those scenes — again and again.

Source:  Owen Gleiberman /Variety

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