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Over the weekend, the Hollywood Critics Association hosted its 2nd Annual HCA TV Awards at The Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles. Disney picked up a number of awards at the event, with “Dopesick” and “Abbott Elementary” picking up multiple awards. Also, What’s On Disney Plus’s writer Mama’s Geeky Tessa Smith presented one of the awards during the ceremony.

Disney+ Originals picked up a number of awards including “The Beatles: Get Back” winning in the Best Streaming Docuseries or Non-Fiction Series category. While “Chip ‘N Dale: Rescue Rangers” won the award for Best Streaming Movie.

Source: Roger Palmer/whatsondisneyplus.com

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George Harrison made it his life’s work to raise consciousness, in every sense of the phrase. In 1971, he managed the extraordinary combination of both raising money for a desperate humanitarian plight in South Asia, and creating a hit record about it.

Probably not too many radio programmers or record buyers knew very much about the former East Pakistan until Harrison used his influence to publicise the country’s plight. He had been deeply moved when his friend Ravi Shankar brought to his attention the human disaster in which millions of refugees from the country were starving, because of the effects of the Bhola cyclone of 1970 and the Liberation War.

Source: Paul Sexton/yahoo.com

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In 1964, pop groups in America didn't talk about politics or social issues. When they spoke to the press at all, it was about very superficial, Tiger Beat-style topics such as what they like to do in their dressing room before a show or whether they had favourite pets at home.

When The Beatles arrived on the scene in 1964, they changed all that. Their invasion of America was not just about music and fashion, but reshaping the very idea of a pop star into a thinking, feeling, three-dimensional human being with principles and opinions.

And all four Beatles were united in their opinion on the policies of racial segregation that were in practice through much of the southern United States. So much so that in the midst of their 23-city tour, they issued a brief, forceful press statement that said: “We will not appear unless Negroes are allowed to sit anywhere.” The Fabs were looking ahead to a date at the Gator Bowl Stadium in Jacksonville, FL, where they'd heard that blacks were confined to the upper tiers at public events.

Source:Bill DeMain/loudersound.com

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John Lennon said The Beatles’ “Strawberry Fields Forever” reflected feelings he had since his childhood. In addition, he said a lyric of the song was about how he must be “crazy” or “a genius.” Notably, the song appeared on the soundtrack album of one of The Beatles’ movies.The book All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono is an interview from 1980. In it, John talks about “Strawberry Fields Forever” at length. “The second line goes, ‘No one I think is in my tree,'” John said. That line actually comes much later in the song than John recalled. “Well, what I was trying to say in that line is ‘Nobody seems to be as hip as me, therefore I must be crazy or a genius.'”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Chances are that you had a few extra guests over the Thanksgiving holiday – namely John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison. Peter Jackson’s “The Beatles: Get Back,” was a three-night Thanksgiving event on Disney+, one that featured previously unseen material from the lead-up to their last-ever live public performance, is astounding and eye-opening, an intimate portrait of larger-than-life creative titans.

“The Beatles: Get Back” is easily one of the premier television events of the year – and if you need some nudging in the direction of the Fab Four, well, here are all the reasons that you should make it appointment viewing.

Source: Drew Taylor/thewrap.com

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George Harrison‘s son, Dhani, said his father said something typical to him in a dream once. Dhani was 23 when his famous father died of cancer in 2001.

The former Beatle and his wife, Olivia, treated Dhani like an adult throughout his life. George told him things about life, including spirituality, from a young age.

When his father died, Dhani was more familiar with what happens after you die than George was at 23. So, Dhani should have expected his father’s response in dreamland.

In an interview with the Associated Press, Olivia said she’s “constantly surprised” to hear Dhani talk about things she didn’t know George had told him.

“Whether it was something for history’s sake, or a mantra, or some lesson, I thought, he didn’t wait until (Dhani) was 30 or 40,” Olivia said. “That’s a real lesson, too. Why do we hold back? Why are we so constrained by time? George didn’t live like that. Maybe he was prescient. Maybe he knew.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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In 1991, George Harrison embarked on a 12-show Japanese tour with his long-time friend Eric Clapton. George had some trepidations about touring for the first time since 1974. However, Clapton put his mind at ease.

When George got on the road, he found that touring wasn’t so bad, at least not that type of touring. It got him out of a rut and even allowed him to perform some of his biggest hits for the first time.
George didn’t like touring because of all the exhausting planning. He didn’t want to waste time getting a band together and rehearsing. However, George still missed playing with other musicians. So, when Clapton said he could have him and his band for a 12-show tour, Geoge couldn’t pass it up.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Eight years after his death, Robin Williams is still revered for his legendary career (via Yahoo! Entertainment). On August 11, 2014, the actor and comedian killed himself after being misdiagnosed with Parkinson's disease. An autopsy later revealed that Williams was actually suffering from Lewy body dementia, a disease (per Mayo Clinic) that slowly deteriorates the mind. Per Biography, his legacy lives on, remembered for his beloved roles in "Good Will Hunting," "Mrs. Doubtfire," "Jumanji," "Aladdin," and many more. Besides his Oscar for "Good Will Hunting," Williams was also a five-time Grammy award-winning performer, out of nine nominations.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Williams had numerous musical accomplishments to his credit. In 1993, he was a part of the "Aladdin" soundtrack, where he sang "Friend Like Me" and "Prince Ali." The album later climbed to No. 6 on the charts. Moreover, NME reports that Williams sang in several of his other films and projects, including in "Mrs. Doubtfire." At the 2000 Academy Awards, he performed "Blame Canada" (as seen on YouTube) from the film "South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut." The Ringer writes that it is now considered to be one of the most iconic moments in Oscar hi details

Disney’s docuseries “The Beatles: Get Back,” has been nominated for five Emmys. Filmmaker Peter Jackson received a nod for directing it, and another entry for Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Series, along with co-producers Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr – the two-living members of the band – as well as John Lennon and George Harrison’s widows, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison.

In the series, Jackson gives an in-depth, behind the scenes view of Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s 80-minute, 1970 documentary “Let It Be,” whose nearly 60 hours of film footage shot in 1969 and recorded over 150 hours of audio. The studio recordings were locked in a vault for 50 years. Jackson and his team accessed the material, and by applying film restoration techniques, they created a nearly 8-hour, three-part series of The Beatles making their twelfth studio album.

Source: Written by Anna Buss, produced by Joshua Farnham

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George Harrison wasn’t impressed with much music, including his own sometimes, but he truly didn’t like “headbanging” guitar players. He thought their type of music was just a bunch of noise. They didn’t know the guitar.

In 1989, George told Mark Rowland (per George Harrison on George Harrison: Interviews and Encounters) that he didn’t consider himself the best guitar player. He might have been if he continued to tour throughout his solo career, but that would’ve been impossible. George liked performing, but touring was exhausting.

“I don’t rate myself as a guitar player, and I know exactly why I’m not—it’s because my life led me to all this other bullshit, and consequently, I didn’t want to keep going on the road and playing,” George explained. “At the same time, you can’t be everything in life. I’m just thankful I’m still here, and whatever it is I do, you know, that’s it.”

Source: cheatsheet.com

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