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Beatles 50th Blog

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 27, 1966

The Beatles were all fans of Bob Dylan, whom they had first met in August 1964. They met him again the following year, and once more on this day during his tour of the United Kingdom.

In 1965 Dylan divided audiences by moving from his folk roots and adopting electric instruments. On this tour he was backed by The Band, and on 26 and 27 May 1966 was scheduled to perform at the Royal Albert Hall in London. The occasion was a fractious one, with audience members jeering and protesting at his new direction.

Dylan invited The Beatles to his shows, and John Lennon and George Harrison attended the second Royal Albert Hall show. Furthermore, all four Beatles spent time with Dylan in London nightclubs and at his hotel.

Following his 26 May concert, Dylan visited Kenwood, Lennon's home in Weybridge. The following day the pair were filmed being driven to the May Fair Hotel in Stratton Street, London, where Dylan was staying.

Present in the limousine was director DA Pennebaker, who had been hired to make a documentary on Dylan's UK tour, and sound operator Bobby Neuwirth. The footage, titled Eat The Document, was later shelved after the US TV network ABC, which had funded the shoot, rejected a rough cut.

Two 10-minute film reels were filled during the journey to London. Lennon and Dylan were evidently recovering from the after effects of drug taking, and both wore sunglasses and smoked cigarettes. In the first reel the pair discussed contemporary musical acts, including the Mamas and the Papas, Barry McGuire, The Silkie and Johnny Cash.

At the beginning of the second reel Dylan is seen complaining of illness, and is pictured leaning forward with his head in his hands. He tells the driver, Tom Keylock, to hurry to the hotel as he may be sick. Pennebaker later revealed that he and Lennon had to help Dylan to his hotel room upon their arrival.

In the final cut of Eat The Document, only a few minutes of the footage was included. The film was screened at the New York Academy of Music on 8 February 1971, and again in 1998, but has rarely been seen since.

An alternative edit, titled You Know Something Is Happening, was made by Pennebaker for private use. This contained more footage of the limousine encounter, but also remains unreleased. Footage from the journey has long circulated among bootleg collectors, however.

Following the evening concert, Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Aspinall and The Rolling Stones all visited Dolly's nightclub on Jermyn Street, London.

Source: Beatles Bible

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 26, 1966

Studio Three, EMI Studios, Abbey Road

The backing track for Paul McCartney's children's song Yellow Submarine was recorded on this day, along with lead and backing vocals.

 George Martin was ill with food poisoning, so the session went ahead without a producer. Martin did, however, send his fiancée Judy Lockhart-Smith to the session; she remained mostly in the Studio Three control room.

The Beatles began the session, which started at 7am and finished at 1am the following morning, by filling two tape reels with rehearsals of the song. Most of these were later wiped, however.

Four takes of the rhythm track were then recorded onto two tracks of the tape. John Lennon used his Gibson Jumbo acoustic guitar, McCartney played bass guitar, George Harrison was on tambourine and Starr played drums.

The fourth track was judged to be the best, and onto this Starr overdubbed his lead vocals, joined by the others in the chorus. A fourth track was filled with additional vocals.

Source: Beatles Bible

 

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 25, 1966

The Beatles - enjoying a short break

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 24, 1966

Nothing much going on today

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 23, 1966

Paperback Writer was released.

Here is what Paul McCartney says about writing Paperback Writer:

“I arrived at [John Lennon’s house in] Weybridge and told John I had this idea of trying to write off to a publishers to become a paperback writer, and I said, ‘I think it should be written like a letter.’ I took a bit of paper out and I said it should be something like, ‘Dear Sir or Madam, as the case may be…’ and I proceeded to write it just like a letter in front of him, occasionally rhyming it … And then we went upstairs and put the melody to it. John and I sat down and finished it all up, but it was tilted towards me — the original idea was mine. I had no music, but it’s just a little bluesy song, not a lot of melody. Then I had the idea to do the harmonies, and we arranged that in the studio”.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 22, 1966

Monte Carlo

May 22, 1966 - George and Pattie at the opening day of the Monaco Grand Prix watching the Formula One races along the streets in Monte Carlo. British driver Jackie Stewart won the first Formula One race of the 1966 season.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 21, 1966

Portobello Road

May 21, 1966 - After an all night party Chrissie Shrimpton and Mick Jagger joined John & Cynthia Lennon on an early morning stroll down London’s trendy Portobello Road.

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 20, 1966

Following the previous day's shoot inside EMI Studios, The Beatles went on location at Chiswick House in London, to film promotional clips for their forthcoming single Paperback Writer/Rain.

As on the previous day, the director was Michael Lindsay-Hogg, working with a crew supplied by InterTel (VTR Services). Unlike the previous day, which was shot on video tape, this day's footage was captured on 35mm colour film.

Chiswick House is an 18th century house and gardens in west London. For the clip for Rain, The Beatles were filmed outside the gates and around a cedar tree, with the group performing as children played among the branches.

For Paperback Writer the group were filmed inside the conservatory, and miming to the song in the statue garden. Some of the conservatory footage was also used in the Rain clip, and extra shots of The Beatles walking in the grounds were later edited into both films.

Meanwhile back at EMI, working between 11:00 am and 12:30 pm, George Martin prepared the first set of stereo mixes and edits since sessions for Revolver began. Following the production of three monaural mixes for Capitol on May 12th, for its "Yesterday....and Today collection, Martin now made two sets of stereos of the same three songs ("And Your Bird Can Sing", Doctor Robert", and "I'm Only Sleeping").

The color clips were first shown in black-and-white on BBC 1's Top Of The Pops. Paperback Writer had its first screening on June 2, 1966, while Rain had its début on the show on June 9th.

In the evening John and Cynthia Lennon attended a party in London with Mick Jagger and Chrissie Shrimpton.

 

 

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 19, 1966

Studio One, EMI Studios, Abbey Road

For the imminent release of the Paperback Writer/Rain single, The Beatles were unwilling to appear on television for promotion. Instead, they took part in a two-day shoot which resulted in a total of seven promotional films for the songs.

This first day's filming took place in Abbey Road's Studio One; the following day they went on location at Chiswick House, London.

The crew was supplied by InterTel (VTR Services), and the director was Michael Lindsay-Hogg. Video tape was used on this first day, while the following day's footage was shot on film.

At 10am a camera rehearsal took place. The first colour performance of Rain was filmed, after which The Beatles watched a playback to see the results. From 1.10-2pm they filmed a colour performance of Paperback Writer.

Both these colour clips were for the US market, and had their première on The Ed Sullivan Show on 5 June 1966, along with a greeting filmed by The Beatles on this day between 6.15pm and 6.30pm.

After lunch The Beatles recorded black-and-white footage for UK viewers, two for Paperback Writer and one for Rain, between 3.30pm and 6.15pm.

The first black-and-white clip of Paperback Writer had its television début on Saturday 25 June in Goodbye Lucky Stars, the final edition of the long-running music show Thank Your Lucky Stars.

The second black-and-white performance of Paperback Writer, along with the one of Rain, were first shown on Ready, Steady, Go! on Friday June 3rd, which was the first time the programme had broadcast footage not from its own studio.

Paul McCartney's song For No One was completed on this day, with the addition of a French horn overdub played by Alan Civil.

A reduction mix, created on May 16th, had freed up two spare tracks on the four-track tape. Bass guitar and tambourine was added onto the first of these, and the second featured two passages recorded by Civil.
 

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: May 18, 1966

Studio Two, EMI Studios, London

This 12-hour session, which began at 2.30pm, was devoted entirely to overdubs and mixing for Paul McCartney's "Got To Get You Into My Life".

The Beatles had recorded the rhythm track on April 8, 1966. In the interim McCartney decided to add a brass section, made up of Eddie Thornton, Ian Hamer and Les Condon on trumpet, and Alan Branscombe and Peter Coe on tenor saxophone.The Beatles wanted a definite jazz feel. Paul and George Martin were in charge. There was nothing written down but Paul sat at the piano and showed up what he wanted and we played with the rhythm track in our headphones. I remember that we tried it a few times to get the feel right, and then John Lennon, who was in the control room, suddenly rushed out, stuck his thumb aloft and shouted, 'Got it!' George Harrison got a little bit involved too but Ringo playing draughts in the corner.

Peter Coe

With the overdub complete, three reduction mixes were made to create more space on the four-track tape. Previously-recorded vocals were judged to be no longer needed, so they were omitted, leaving only bass guitar, drums and brass. McCartney then added new vocals, accompanied by tambourine and organ. The fourth track was filled with a second lead vocal and an electric guitar part.

At the end of the session two mono mixes were created. The song wasn't complete, however: George Harrison added a guitar solo onto the first vocal track on June 17th, necessitating more mono mixes afterwards.

The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions, Mark Lewisohn