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Beatles 50th Blog

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 17, 1966

The Beatles are taking a break.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 16, 1966

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 15, 1966

The Beatles having a day of rest.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 13, 1966

Another day of free time (or was it?) for the Beatles.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 12, 1966

The Beatles were given three prestigious Ivor Novello awards on this day in recognition of their outstanding achievements in 1965.

Yesterday was judged to be the most outstanding song of the year. The other two awards were for sales: We Can Work It Out was the top-selling single of 1965, while Help! was the second-best selling.

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 11, 1966

The Beatles recovering and having jet lag from the tour.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 10, 1966

Today was a day of rest and relaxation for The Beatles.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 9, 1966

Saturday, 9 July 1966

It was Saturday, under the sign of Cancer. The US president was Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic). In that special week of July people in US were listening to Paperback Writer by The Beatles. In UK Sunny Afternoon by The Kinks was in the top 5 hits. Torn Curtain, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, was one of the most viewed movies released in 1966 while Valley Of The Dolls by Jacqueline Susann was one of the best selling books.

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 8, 1966

Travel: India to England

Following their first trip to India, The Beatles returned to England on this day.

They arrived at London Airport at 6am. A brief press conference was held, and George Harrison and Ringo Starr were interviewed by the radio show Today on the BBC Home Service.

The following is a transcript of The Beatles' interview with the ITV network.

Q: At the airport, did they come up and start physically threatening you?

Paul McCartney: We got to the airport and our road managers had a lot of trouble trying to get the equipment in because the escalators had been turned off, and things. So we got there, and we got put into the transit lounge. And we got pushed around from one corner of the lounge to another, you know.

John Lennon: 'You're treated like ordinary passenger! Ordinary passenger!' Ordinary passenger, what, he doesn't get kicked, does he?

McCartney: And so they started knocking over our road managers and things, and everyone was falling all over the place.

Q: That started worrying you, when the road manager got knocked over.

McCartney: Yeah, and I swear there were 30 of 'em.

Q: What do you say there were?

Lennon: Well, I saw sort of five in sort of outfits, you know, that were doing the actual kicking and booing and shouting.

Q: Did you get kicked any?

Lennon: No, I was very delicate and moved every time they touched me. But I was petrified. I could have been kicked and not known it, you know. We'll just never go to any nuthouses again.

Q: Would you go to Manila again, George?

George Harrison: No, I didn't even want to go that time.

Lennon: Me too.

Harrison: Because we'd heard that it was a terrible place anyway, and when we got there. It was proved.

Source: The Beatles Bible

 

The Beatles 50 Years Ago Today: July 7, 1966

The Beatles go sightseeing in India

The day after their arrival in India, The Beatles managed to sneak out of their New Delhi hotel, the Oberoi, and did some sightseeing.

Ringo Starr: That was our first time in India, and it was quite interesting; but we had a bad day when the guys from British Airways took us out to see a camel drawing water - they go round in circles to work the pump where the water comes out. You could always tell the people who worked for BA in Delhi, because they all wore ties even though it was about 300 degrees in the shade. One guy thought it would be a bit of fun to jump on the poor animal that was walking round - probably that was all it would ever do in its life, drag this harness and draw the water. It was crazy, so we all got a bit angry with him.

But then we went shopping, and going around looking at the shops is probably the biggest memory of that time in Delhi. We were offered huge pieces of ivory carvings, and we thought it was all too expensive - huge chess pieces, which would now be antiques and worth fortunes. But I'm glad we didn't buy it; even in those days we were thinking not to buy ivory.

The Beatles each bought Indian instruments from Rikhi Ram & Sons, a shop on New Delhi's Connaught Circle.

George Harrison: I bought a sitar. I had a guy bring them over - again, we couldn't really get out easily. I bought a sitar off a man called Rikhi Ram, whose shop is still there in Delhi to this day.

We got in cars and had a ride out of Delhi to see what it looked like. That was quite an eye-opener. We were in enormous old late-1950s Cadillacs, and we went to a little village and got out of the cars. We all had Nikon cameras, and that was when it first sunk into me about the poverty. There were little kids coming up to us with flies all over them and asking for money: 'Baksheesh! Baksheesh!' Our cameras were worth more money than the whole village would earn in a lifetime. It was a very strange feeling seeing this: Cadillacs and poverty.