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Beatles 50th Blog

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 10, 1969

Not much news happening today.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 9, 1969

Even though today was John Lennon's 29th birthday, Yoko Ono, who was pregnant was rushed to King's College Hospital, London, for an emergency blood transfusion.

Fearing that she may lose her baby, and indeed she did suffer a miscarriage four days later. Lennon remained by her side throughout her stay in hospital.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 8, 1969

George Harrison Interview: Apple Offices, London

George Harrison was interviewed at Apple Offices in London on October 8th 1969 by David Wigg. Their conversation would air later that month in two parts on the BBC Radio-One program ‘Scene and Heard.' At the time of this interview, the Abbey Road LP was number one on the album charts, having been released just 12 days earlier.

Wigg would later remember of his meeting with Harrison: "We met at the Apple offices in London... It was an important time for George as he was emerging as a strong songwriting influence. He explained how 'Here Comes The Sun' had come to him while sitting in Eric Clapton's garden, and that 'Something' was for Patti (George's then-wife). He also described what meditation and Hare Krishna meant to him, the Beatles financial problems, and how he came to terms with being a Beatle."

In addition to being a BBC radio personality, David Wigg was also famous for being a columnist for the Daily Express, as well as the London Evening News. In 1976, Wigg would release a double album featuring his interviews with each of the four Beatles, entitled 'The Beatles Tapes.'

- Jay Spangler,

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The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 7, 1969

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The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 6, 1969

The Beatles single Something/Come Together was released in the U.S. This was the first time a George Harrison song received top billing on a Beatles single.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 5, 1969

Today John Lennon added all the last touches on the stereo mixes of Cold Turkey (on September 29th). Alos, John created further mixes today. The whole session lasted a full 12 hours, from 10am to 10pm, and also saw the completion of the single's b-side Don't Worry Kyoko (Mummy's Only Looking For Her Hand In The Snow), which had been recorded two days previously.

Lennon then added a series of overdubs to the September 28th recording of Cold Turkey made at Trident Studios. He taped two new lead vocals and added more lead guitar, including the backwards flourish at the song's close.

 

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 4, 1969

The Beatles were not recording anything today.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 3, 1969

October 3, 1969: Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ U.S. Release

Although it was not the last new album released by the Fab Four – that was Let It Be – it was their last recording together. It’s marked by a number of contradictions and compromises.

One is the critical reception given to Abbey Road, best described as mixed on its release. Yet over time it has come to be considered by many to be the best Beatles LP (a subject that can be debated ad infinitum). A number of its merits were a result of final genuine collaborations by a band that was already splintered if not for all intents and purposes broken up. Other high points were bones of contention, most notably the medley on side two.

After the uncomfortable Get Back sessions (which became Let It Be) failed to renew the esprit de corps The Beatles once had, Paul McCartney asked George Martin to produce them again, and he insisted the four Beatles get together to record as they used to – a quick tight series of sessions as a band. It didn’t exactly work out that way, though Harrison does recall that “we did actually perform like musicians again.” Recording started on February 2, 1969, with later sessions in April and May. Finally they reconvened on June 2 and worked on the album through August.

McCartney and Lennon had reconnected creatively when they worked together on “The Ballad of John and Yoko” in April of that year. But they were heading in very different directions (as their later solo work would amplify). John dismissed Paul’s writing as music “for the grannies to dig.” The presence of Yoko Ono at the sessions didn’t help matters, especially after John and Yoko were in a car accident. A doctor prescribed bed rest for her, so a bed was brought into the studio so she could still be present.

Lennon wanted it to be an album of discrete songs, and suggested that one side be his material and the other Paul’s. He felt the medley on side two was “junk… just bits of songs thrown together.” Yet Ringo Starr recalls it as “for me one of the finest pieces we put together.” It was Harrison who maybe shone strongest with “Something,” inspired by then-Apple Records artist James Taylor’s song “Something in the Way She Moves.”

It was a double-sided #1 single with “Come Together”

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 2, 1969

Across The Universe was be included on the World Wildlife Fund's album No One's Gonna Change My World. Today, the song was given two stereo mixes.

Since the song had been recorded back in February 1968, it had remained unreleased. At this stage, prior to Phil Spector's remixing in early 1970, it still featured backing vocals by two Apple Scruffs.

During this 9.30-11am session, George Martin and balance engineer Jeff Jarratt mixed the song. The wildlife effects had already been added, most likely back on February 8, 1968.

No One's Gonna Change My World was issued in the United Kingdom on December 12. 1969 as Regal Starline SRS 5013. Across The Universe was the first track on the album, which also featured The Bee Gees, Cilla Black, Bruce Forsyth, Rolf Harris, The Hollies, Lulu, Spike Milligan, Cliff Richard, Harry Secombe and Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky Mick and Tich.

This mix of Across The Universe was also included on the Past Masters collection. Remember the movie back in 2007?

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: October 1, 1969

Five days after its UK release, The Beatles' last-recorded LP, Abbey Road, was issued in the United States today - five days after its UK release.  The catalog number was Apple SO 383.

The album made its Billboard 200 debut at number 178, before climbing to number 4 the following week. In its third week on sale it reached the top of the charts, where it remained for 11 consecutive weeks, although it was not the highest-selling album in the 1969 Christmas week.

Abbey Road spent 129 weeks on the chart. It was the fourth best-selling album of 1970 in the US, and was eventually certified 12x platinum by the RIAA. It also won a Grammy for Best Engineered Non-Classical Recording.

In its first six weeks on sale, Abbey Road sold four million copies worldwide. By the time the group had officially disbanded in 1970, it had sold more than 7 million copies.