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Global Beatles Day was founded, not with commercial purposes, but to commemorate their music and celebrate them collectively and individually. Even further tan Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison's magical tunes, The Beatles were huge on promoting peace and love, truth and youth, and most of all, the expansion of human consciousness. They explored the expansion of rhythm and blues, rock and roll, until they innovated and found new ways to make music. GBD is celebrated on June 25th because the hit song “All you need is love” was performed by The Beatles on the BBC produced program, Our World, on that same day in 1967.

In order to celebrate the four musicians, we’ve compiled a series of their greatest quotes; some of which made it into their song lyrics, and some others just went down in history.

 

“Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.” – John Lennon

“And, in the end, the love you take, is equal to the love you make.” – Paul McCartney

“It's all in the mind.” – George Harrison

“Time you enjoy wasting, was not wasted.” – John Lennon

By: details

Perhaps the most surprising thing about Paul McCartney’s recent collaborations with rap superstar Kanye West — apart from the fact that Paul McCartney actually collaborated with Kanye West — is how dominant the former Beatle is on each song.

Though it’s coated with auto-tune and sung by West, “Only One” is the kind of crackling oddball that would sit right at home on 1980’s weird but sincere McCartney II, its punch-drunk keys and effects dropping out intermittently to reinforce West’s intense love for his young daughter and late mother.

“FourFiveSeconds” is sung largely by R&B hitmaker Rihanna. Its words are an ode to club-life catharses — “I think I’ve had enough/ I might get a little drunk/ I say what’s on my mind/ I might do a little time” — and it leans heavily on Rihanna’s serpentine croon and West’s earnest speak-singing. But the bright jangle of McCartney’s acoustic guitar and the ebullient lilt of the song’s infectious chorus recall the underrated joys of 1971’s Ram.

Following the December release of “Only One,” a shower of uninformed Twitter users reacted details

But Berwyn Mountains flying saucer investigator Russ Kellett insists the drawing of an encounter Lennon had with a flying saucer in New York is genuine.

The former girlfriend of John Lennon is reported to have claimed a rare drawing of a UFO by the Beatles legend, acquired by an expert on one of North Wales’ greatest mysteries, is a fake.

Russ Kellett, is known for investigating the 1974 UFO Berwyn Mountains incident involving theories of an extraterrestrial craft crashing in the area.

Mr Kellett said a few months ago he bought Lennon’s sketch of an encounter he had with a flying saucer in New York - the same year as the North Wales incident.

However May Pang, who was with Lennon at the time of their alleged UFO sighting in New York, has reportedly told the online magazine examiner.com it is a fake. She is reported to have said: “Seriously???!!!! This is not anything close to his drawing style. He never drew another one of the UFO sketch when he was with me. I have that one. He definitely would not draw one when he was living with Yoko and me in the pic.”

By: Steve Bagnall

Source: Daily Post

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Stuart Sutcliffe - Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Stuart Fergusson Victor Sutcliffe (23 June 1940 – 10 April 1962) was a Scottish-born artist and musician best known as the original bassist for the Beatles. Sutcliffe left the band to pursue his career as an artist, having previously attended the Liverpool College of Art. Sutcliffe and John Lennon are credited with inventing the name, "Beetles", as they both liked Buddy Holly's band, the Crickets. The band used this name for a while until Lennon decided to change the name to "the Beatles", from the word Beat. As a member of the group when it was a five-piece band, Sutcliffe is one of several people sometimes referred to as the "Fifth Beatle".

When the Beatles played in Hamburg, he met photographer Astrid Kirchherr, to whom he was later engaged. After leaving the Beatles, he enrolled in the Hamburg College of Art, studying under future pop artist, Eduardo Paolozzi, who later wrote a report stating that Sutcliffe was one of his best students. Sutcliffe earned other praise for his paintings, which mostly explored a style related to abstract expressionism.

While studying in Germany, Sutcliffe began experiencing severe headaches and acute sensitivity to light. In the first days of April 1962, he collapsed in th details

An Omaha teenager had a part-time job and money to spend. He had his own bedroom, with four blank walls. And he had a major man-crush on the Beatles.

The logical thing to do? Buy some costly acrylic paint and create a “Yellow Submarine” mural. It took more than a year and some trial and error, but when it was done, it made him proud. He signed his name and the date at the bottom: Jay Dandy, 1977.

It turns out that Dandy’s love for pop art and iconic artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein — and his affinity for the colorful decade that put them in the spotlight — have influenced a fair piece of his life since he moved away from Omaha.

He got an art history degree, became a pop art collector, met some influential people in the art world and now is a research assistant in the modern and contemporary art department at the Art Institute of Chicago.

To Dandy’s gratification, visitors to a late-spring estate sale at his childhood home still were able to see his pop-art masterpiece more than 35 years after he painted it.

By: Betsie Freeman

Source: World Herald

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He entranced The Stones and beguiled three-fourths of The Beatles.

Allen Klein managed the careers of them all for a good spell, making him one of the most important money men in the history of the music business. Until Fred Goodman's witty, gossipy and wonderfully well-researched new book, however, no one had the full skinny on the guy.

"Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out The Beatles, Made The Stones and Transformed Rock n Roll" (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt $27) tells the amazing tale of how its subject managed to woo the top stars of the day, with a formula that enriched them while enriching himself far more.

Tellingly, Klein didn't develop artists from scratch. His m.o. involved stalking established stars who were being underpaid by their record companies. Since nearly every musician was in that unfortunate position during Klein's peak years (the '60s and '70s), his predatory methods had plenty of takers.

During his reign, Klein managed Sam Cooke, Bobby Vinton, Donovan and The Kinks, along with Jagger and company and all the Beatles save Sir Paul. (McCartney opted to go with his father in law, John Eastman.)

Goodman, who previously penned "The Mansion on the Hill," which examined the ri details

A new show at the Royal Albert Hall offers a faithful glimpse of the sessions that led to Revolver and Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

The creator of a new stage musical based on the Beatles’ Abbey Road sessions wants to introduce the Fab Four to the MP3 generation.

The Sessions at Abbey Road — at the Royal Albert Hall next year — will recreate the process by which albums such as Revolver and Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band were made in front of a live audience inside an exact replica of the legendary Studio Two.

The two-hour performance, described as a “musical documentary”, will span the Beatles’ career using period equipment, 39 musicians and eight singers.

The studio will be replicated, based on the recollections of studio chief engineer Geoff Emerick, but executive producer Stig Edgren told the Standard the actors would not be lookalikes of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.

He said: “It’s the most daunting challenge of my career. The most honourable musical event I think I will ever be involved in. I really want to bring this to a new generation. I have 29-year-old twin daughters who hav details

TORONTO - Whether hanging out on a roof with John Lennon, on a runway with Led Zeppelin, or on a subway car with the Ramones, rock photographer Bob Gruen has always had a knack for capturing the moment. He once played bugle for the Clash, he served as personal photographer to Lennon and Yoko Ono, and his 69th birthday party last year attracted the likes of Alice Cooper, Billie Joe Armstrong and Debbie Harry. Toronto's Liss Gallery is hosting an exhibition and sale of the New Yorker's most-famous work beginning Tuesday and running to July 11. Ahead of his trip, Gruen shared the stories behind some of his most famous photographs.

JOHN LENNON Gruen took many photos of Lennon during his post-Beatles American phase, but none more famous than his shots of Lennon peering into the camera behind circular shades, lanky arms exposed under a sleeveless shirt reading "New York City." The shirt was a garment unique to the sidewalks of Times Square that Gruen used to buy in bunches. He cut the sleeves off one to lend it a "New York look" and gifted it to Lennon. A year later, Gruen was shooting Lennon on the roof of his apartment and, noticing the distinctive skyline, Gruen suggested Lennon wear the shirt, if he still had it (to Gruen details

The rocker annually celebrates his birthday by asking fans to stop at noon wherever they are and offer up a 'peace and love' salute, while sending out positive vibes to the world - and this year, he's planning to stage his own special moment at the Hollywood landmark, which holds a special place in Beatles lore.

Next month's (07Jul15) peace and love moment will mark the 10th anniversary of Ringo's birthday initiative.

By: Wenn

Source: contactmusic.com >>

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For a living legend whose entire career has consistently been redefined, it's a given that Sir Paul McCartney's headlining set at Firefly 2015 on Friday (June 19) would be career-defining, yet again. And on the second night of the four-day fest, the Beatles icon showed that not only does he consistently up himself, but he outshone the bounty of young talent that rocked the stages at the Delaware festival earlier in the day.

As a consummate performer, the 73-year-old kept the energy cranked for the duration of his near two-and-a-half hour show, running through a string of classics spanning his work with the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist. Affable and jovial, he demonstrated musical versatility with ease -- strumming a ukulele, pounding a piano, plucking an acoustic guitar -- as well as endurance, for his first ever show in the first state.

McCartney began promptly at 10 p.m. following a riotous set from Run the Jewels on the adjacent stage. The crowd swelled to a remarkable volume--vastly larger than that of Morrissey, who played to a shockingly minute attendance hours prior--as Macca kicked off with "Birthday" and new cut "Save Us," setting the tone for the ebullient evening.

"We're gonna have a bit details

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