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Paul McCartney and Bob Dylan had been unarguably two of a very powerful artists of their era — however somebody outshone them in John Lennon’s eyes. He most well-liked a distinct rock singer whose music is lesser-known. Interestingly, Dylan revealed his emotions about John in a music.


In a 1970s interview with Rolling Stone, Jann S. Wenner requested which modern artists John admired in any medium. John stated as a result of he was an “ego-maniac” he solely assessed one other artist by way of whether or not he noticed them as a menace. What did he imply by that? He didn’t elaborate.

After that, John stated he admired an eclectic group of musicians, together with Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Frank Zappa. In addition, he praised the painters Andy Warhol, Salvador Dalí, and Marcel Duchamp. He then began discussing his spouse, Yoko Ono.

Source: Jeremy Spirogis/sahiwal.tv

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John Lennon and Sir Elton John, it seems, had an interesting relationship. In the movie Rocketman, a tribute to John is clear when Taron Egerton, playing Sir Elton, looks at a photo of John to influence his choice of stage name. While this isn’t strictly factual, clearly the pair had a close bond which was important enough to include.
Did Sir Elton John and John Lennon ever collaborate?

John Lennon and Sir Elton absolutely did collaborate, with some interesting circumstances behind some of their working together.

Both Sir Elton and John were keen songwriters, with Sir Elton usually relying on his writing partner, Bernie Taupin, to provide him with lyrics which he could set to music.

Interestingly, John and his Beatles writing partner, Sir Paul McCartney, did not have this issue, as they both contributed lyrics and music to one another’s compositions.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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Amid the unfolding horror and confusion of allofthis™, we all made a few promises to ourselves about lockdown. We would read more books, maybe learn a new language… and we’d do puzzles! Lego started selling out everywhere. Not the easy, ‘help-your-nephew-at-Christmas’ type, but the big bastards – the Tower Bridges, the VW Camper Vans, the kind of thing where an adult could say to themselves, ‘It’s OK – I’m still being an adult, because bridges and cars are ADULT things.’

Another of the things I was especially looking forward to in September was the new Beatles movie, Get Back, the Peter Jackson-directed re-telling of what became the fated ‘Let It Be’ film project. But, like so many things this year, it was not to be. Covid has put paid to many cultural events – Glastonbury, Tokyo 2020, theatre – and now 2020’s big Beatles release has joined them; we won’t find out until August 2021 whether Ringo retrieves the Precious.

Source: nme.com

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In some ways, the Beatles' album art could be just as fascinating as the music inside. The stories behind 16 of their famous LP covers include a lengthy creative relationship, one-off moments of inspiration and weird experimentation, a memorable public outcry and a very sad goodbye.

Five of these 16 features images came courtesy of late photographer Robert Freeman, who worked with the Beatles from 1963-66. This fruitful era produced career-defining early cover art for With the Beatles, A Hard Day’s Night, Beatles for Sale, Help! and Rubber Soul, as well as a number of the band's EPs and John Lennon's books In His Own Write and A Spaniard in the Works.

The tasteful Freeman was notably absent from the creative process surrounding their most controversial cover from that period – the quickly yanked Yesterday ... and Today, which featured the in-famous "butcher cover." A series of iconic moments followed as the Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, their self-titled White Album and then Abbey Road while working with a rotating group of new collaborators including Peter Blake, Richard Hamilton and Iain Macmillan. The first two were a study in contrasts, one busy and the other almost comp details

Lennon-McCartney were regarded as the backbone of The Beatles, with their songs changing the music scene. The pair have influenced a huge number of performers with their music and their creativity in the recording studio. While Sir Ringo Starr and George Harrison also contributed, it was John Lennon and Sir Paul McCartney who really made the magic happen - but even Sir Paul was left confused by how they were named.

There does not seem to be a reason why John Lennon’s name went first, except perhaps that the names were alphabetical.

Sir Paul described how the decision making took place, which he has said happened without him being there.

He even suggested the names would be swapped depending on who wrote the song.

He told The Telegraph in 2015: “We had a meeting with Brian Epstein [manager of the Beatles]. I arrived late.

“John and Brian had been talking. ‘We were thinking we ought to call the songs, Lennon and McCartney.’

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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The wives of great men are so often cast in a supporting role, their lives dedicated to helping their spouses from the wings of the world stage.

Not so Linda McCartney, whose creativity and artistic flair was central to the relationship with her husband and Beatle Paul.

This is one of the many takeaways from the Walker Art Gallery's retrospective of her extraordinary photography, which opens in Liverpool tomorrow.

The collection of more than 250 black and white bromide prints, colour C-types, Polaroids, cyanotypes and contact sheets demonstrates not only what a talent she was in her own right, but how this first attracted Paul McCartney and was central to their marriage until her death in 1998.

Source: Laura Davis/liverpoolecho.co.uk

 

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For the beginning musician, performing a cover is almost a rite of passage. It’s a win-win — the song is already written and, if chosen well, already beloved. So it makes sense that “Yesterday” — the most famous song off The Beatles’ 1965 album Help! — is not only one of their most popular tracks but also one of the most covered songs in history. With relatively simple music and lyrics, “Yesterday” is a pretty straightforward song to perform, but that doesn’t diminish its impact; the song’s beauty exists in its simplicity.

One of Paul McCartney’s greatest strengths is his ability to craft songs that not only remain timeless but continually reassert their relevance. For instance, “Blackbird”, an ode to the continued strength of Black Americans during the Civil Rights Movement in the ‘60s, has only become more relevant in the face of police brutality and the Black Lives Matter movement. “Yesterday” has proven itself just as relevant, maybe even more so each day. In a time of crippling uncertainty in every aspect of life, there is no more appealing thing to believe in than yesterday (or maybe like six months ago). “Y details

Sir Paul McCartney has admitted he found his late Beatles bandmate John Lennon's song 'How Do You Sleep?' “hurtful”.

The track from Lennon's 1971 solo album, 'Imagine', was penned after McCartney successfully dissolved the Beatles partnership in a High Court lawsuit, and after the iconic Liverpool group's frontman slammed his bandmates - Macca, Sir Ringo Starr and the late George Harrison - in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine in 1970, the year they split.

McCartney and his then-wife Linda reacted by having ads published mocking Lennon and his now-widow Yoko Ono, which saw them dressed up as clowns.

'How Do You Sleep?' was penned in response to McCartney's solo LP 'Ram', which featured the track 'Too Many People', which he later admitted intended to slam Lennon.

Source: music-news.com

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1966’s Revolver is the album that ultimately cemented The Beatles‘ reputation as creative studio geniuses atop the pyramid of commercial music at the time. It may not have the epic range of material as heard on The White Album, or the cohesiveness of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band released the following year, but Revolver marks the first time where the Beatles truly stepped outside of their comfort zone in the studio and expanded the idea of what rock and roll could be.

Coming off 1965’s Rubber Soul, the Beatles were at the peak of their fame. Yet, each member was growing increasingly disillusioned with all that was involved with “The Beatles” and their growing legion of fans. John Lennon was perhaps the most affected, causing a huge uproar in the United States when he proclaimed that the Beatles were “bigger than Jesus Christ.” The demands of the road, the size of the shows, and the non-stop schedule had pushed the band to their limits, so they cleared a few months from their calendar to give themselves time to prepare for their next album.

Source: Gideon Plotnicki/liveforlivemusic.com

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Sir Elton John’s concert residencies in Las Vegas were, in his own words, a “spectacular and successful” chapter in his career. Just don’t expect Sir Paul McCartney to follow suit.

In remarks unlikely to keep him on Sir Elton’s Christmas card list, Sir Paul has described Las Vegas as an “elephants’ graveyard” where the stars “go to die”.

The former Beatle was asked by an interviewer if he had “ever considered doing a residency in Vegas, like Elton John, or doing what Bruce Springsteen did on Broadway?” Springsteen performed five nights a week for more than a year at a theatre in New York City from 2017-18, while Sir Elton played 450 shows over two residencies at Caesars Palace to 1.8 million fans.

“Some people would like me to do it, as they say I’ve got plenty of stories and plenty of songs, but one of the things that’s holding me back at the moment is that Bruce has just done it, you know?

Source: Anita Singh/telegraph.co.uk

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Arguably the most ignominious firing in rock history happened on Aug. 16, 1962. Shortly before recording their debut single, the Beatles dismissed drummer Pete Best.

Two months earlier, the group passed an audition for Parlophone Records. But while producer George Martin liked what he heard, he was dissatisfied with Best. He told the Beatles that, while they could use Best onstage, he was going to bring in a session drummer for the recordings. The other Beatles, along with manager Brian Epstein, discussed the situation and decided that it was in their best interests to sack the drummer entirely. On Aug. 16, Epstein called Best into his office and told him the news that he was out.

Known around Liverpool as "mean, moody and magnificent," Best had joined the Beatles almost exactly two years earlier when they needed a drummer for their upcoming residency in Hamburg, Germany. His audition was only a few days before they made the trip. But his sullen personality never fit in well with the wisecracking Beatles, even refusing to adopt the soon-to-be-famous "Beatles haircut."

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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John's mother, Julia Stanley, was one of five sisters, along with Anne, Betty, Harriet, and Mimi all born in Liverpool. Stubborn and headstrong, Julia gave her parents an uphill battle when they disapproved of the hotel bellboy, Alfred Lennon she started seeing at the age of 14.

Then Alfred became a ship's steward, and his life and relationship with Julia survived long absences at sea and the war that followed. In 1938 they secretly married in a register's office because Julia's family still didn't accept him. Then Julia fell pregnant with John.

However, Alfred then sailed out of the picture entirely, and so Julia went back to live in her childhood home under her disapproving father's roof, but it didn't stop the string of romances that followed.

Julia then fell pregnant by a passing Welsh soldier. She gave the little girl up for adoption and then started dating "Bobby" Dykins whom she met while waitressing. During this time, 5-year-old John was being looked after Julia's sister, Mimi, as she basically moved out and into Dykins' arms.

Source: Odette Odendaal/news.amomama.com

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Paul McCartney revealed in a recent interview with British GQ that he hadn't returned to his childhood home in Liverpool until James Corden convinced him to for a "Carpool Karaoke" segment.

The former Beatle appeared on a 2018 episode of Corden's "The Late Late Show," and told GQ that filming with Corden in his former hometown, where he lived for the first 20 years of his life, was "really great."

"I'd never been inside my old house. I hadn't been back since I left it," McCartney explained, adding, "James suggested doing it."

"I was always a little apprehensive about going back. I didn't know if it was going to be nice or whether I would get bad memories or whatever, although I don't really know what I was worried about," the musician continued.

Source: Libby Torres /insider.com

 

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John Lennon’s aunt recalls buying him his first guitar in 1981

John Lennon could be pretty candid when it came to Beatles tracks he didn’t like. But the late star was also very honest about his favourites. During an interview with Playboy in 1980, Lennon revealed which of George Harrison’s tracks he was particularly fond of.

Spotted by Far Out Magazine, Lennon saw Harrison’s Within You Without You as one of his favourite Beatles songs.

On the Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band track, the late Beatle said: “One of George’s best songs.

“One of my favourites of his, too. He’s clear on that song.

“His mind and his music are clear.”

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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Paul McCartney recently got candid about The Beatles' split in an interview with British GQ.

The 78-year-old music legend said the fallout was "pretty hurtful," largely thanks to his decision to sue the band.

"Well, as you can imagine, that was horrendous and it gave me some terrible times," he said. "I drank way too much and did too much of everything."

In 1970, after the four Beatles went their separate ways, McCartney filed a lawsuit to dissolve the band's contracts with its publishing company, Apple Corps, and notorious manager, Allen Klein. McCartney told GQ that his distrust of Klein was the catalyst, twice calling him a "f---ing idiot."

According to McCartney, Klein would have owned the band's music if not for the lawsuit.

Source: msn.com

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Hail, Macca. Sir Paul McCartney is not only GQ’s September cover star, nor – discounting a couple of brash pretenders – merely the king of rock'n'roll, but ultimately the godfather of modern British music. A perennial presence for nigh-on 60 years, McCartney’s output is astounding: 12 Beatles albums, seven with Wings and 17 more solo, plus countless other credits on original songs performed and covered by artists around the world. He’s one half of the most famous musical writing pair ever and has collaborated with everyone from U2 to Nirvana to Kanye West. To put it bluntly, he’s produced a lot of very good music in his life.

Source: Thomas Barrie/gq-magazine.co.uk

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Back in 1971, the beloved music icon Sir Paul McCartney formed the band, Wings, following the break-up of the Beatles in 1970. So today, let's take a walk down memory lane as we examine one of Macca's No.1 hits, 'Silly Love Songs'. Forty-four years ago, back in 1976, McCartney and his musical project, Wings, wrote a self-aware rebuttal to his critics regarding McCartney’s penchant for writing love songs. The resulting hit ‘Silly Love Songs’ was a clap back at the singer's naysayers, including John Lennon, who had once slammed his former bandmate in an interview, saying that all Macca ever wrote anymore were silly love songs. McCartney promptly responded with this gem and went on to top the chart with his 27th overall No.1 hit. So let's revisit Sir Paul McCartney at his groovy, goofy and sentimental best. You can check the light-hearted music video out here below, which also serves as a charming tribute to Linda McCartney, the rockstar's wife.

Source: Brian Polson/meaww.com

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John Lennon and his bandmates started one of the most important bands in history: the Beatles. Sir Paul McCartney and John were the main writers, while George Harrison and Sir Ringo Starr also contributed in many ways. The group split in 1970 but at one point, a reunion may have been on the cards for the band.

Beatles fans are, even to this day, debating whether a Beatles reunion could have happened before John Lennon’s death in 1980.

John was shot outside his home in New York on December 8, 1980, though his legacy in his work with the Beatles has lasted.

However, fans have often wondered whether the band may have got back together at some point, and one fan on a Quora forum has even suggested John wrote a song, signalling his return.

The song (Just Like) Starting Over, released by John on his final album Double Fantasy, speaks of a relationship blossoming and starting again.

Source: Jenny Desborough/express.co.uk

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Residents of Southern Illinois, especially those of the original Beatles-loving Baby Boomer generation, are well aware of the fact that George Harrison visited Benton in September of 1963. The first Beatle to come to America, George traveled across the pond to visit his sister Louise, who had recently purchased a home at 113 McCann St. in Benton with her husband, Gordon Caldwell, who had found work as a mining engineer in Franklin County.

Louise, the eldest of the Harrison children — George being the youngest — promoted her brother’s band on the radio waves of Southern Illinois and to anyone who would listen on the street. When George visited just four months before the Beatles’ big debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, he and the Beatles were still unknown in the United States and he was able to enjoy a carefree excursion in the region, playing on stage with a local band, purchasing a Rickenbacker guitar in Mount Vernon, visiting Garden of the Gods in the Shawnee National Forest, and hitting up the local root beer stand and drive-in movie theater. In 2017, a mural was even constructed near the Benton exit on Interstate 57 commemorating George’s visit in early fall of 1963.

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John Lennon and Paul McCartney had an incredible writing partnership during The Beatles years. But did you know they once finishing writing and recording one of their many No 1 hits in just a single day? The track in question is The Ballad of John and Yoko.

According to Far Out Magazine, Lennon and McCartney managed the feat while George Harrison and Ringo Starr were away.

John said in 1969: “It doesn’t mean anything.

“It just so happened that there were only two of us there.

“George was abroad and Ringo was on the film and he couldn’t come that night.”

Source: express.co.uk

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The co-lead vocalist and bassist of The Beatles, Paul McCartney has made the last call to his fans to take part in the ‘Great Day Fan Video‘ project which will premier in McCartney’s YouTube channel.

Paul McCartney has announced the chance to star in a special video to his followers on  Twitter. He asked his fans to submit a video of themselves having fun with the people they love. The videos, which fans show that they are having a great day, will be collected and edited for a fan video.

On the announcement made for the project on McCartney’s website, it was stated that they expect his fans to share their favorite moments at home from the past couple of months. The videos may range from water fights in the garden to lockdown crafts with the kids. There is no limit to the content.

Source: Dilara Onen/ metalheadzone.com

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In 1964, a persistent hurricane-stricken Jacksonville, Florida crowd gathered excitedly to watch The Beatles step foot on stage. Little did they know just how close the concert was to being canceled. The U.S. was in the full throws of segregation and a civil rights movement. It was a time when, as historian Dr. Kitty Oliver remembers,
“public accommodations were separate, inequities were rampant, and opportunities were stifled.” She goes on to recount, “As tensions accelerated, our churches warned us not to get involved in civil rights activities for fear of reprisal against our parents.” It was also peak Beatlemania and a 16-year-old Oliver couldn’t help but be drawn to a wider world and perspective.

“Still, some of us risked rebellion,” Oliver admits. “At night, for fun, I listened to the ‘White radio station.’ That’s where I was introduced to The Beatles. They were rebels, flaunting their difference in the way they looked and sounded, and I was a fan from the start.” This is also where she heard that The Beatles were coming to town and would be at the Gator Bowl Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. Fueled by determination and the growing tide details

An in-depth look at The Beatles’ final year is the subject of a new book from author Ken McNab, a lifelong fan of the band. And In The End: The Last Days of The Beatles, according to an announcement from its publisher, Thomas Dunne Books, is “a detailed account of the breakup featuring the perspectives of all four band members.” The book arrives Aug. 18.

“In a month-by-month chronology,” the announcement continues, McNab “reconstructs the events of 1969 when The Beatles reached new highs of creativity and new lows of their internal strife. In the midst of this rancor, however, emerged the glorious disharmony of Let It Be and the ragged genius of Abbey Road.”

[2020 was expected to be host to another round of 50th anniversary Beatles celebrations. The pandemic, however, has altered many of those plans. Peter Jackson’s documentary, The Beatles: Get Back, compiled from 55 hours of unseen footage and 140 hours of mostly unheard audio recordings taken during the original Let It Be film and album sessions, has been moved to Aug. 27, 2021. It was originally scheduled for Sept. 4 of this year.]

Source: Best Classic Bands Staff/bestclassicbands.com

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A Columbia grad student, new to the city, lost his lease. So he organized the perfect send-off.

On an otherwise quiet pandemic Sunday, the unmistakable songs of the Beatles started blaring from the roof of a building on the Upper West Side. The band was belting out faithful renditions from the 1969 rooftop concert in London — “Get Back,” “Don’t Let Me Down,” “I’ve Got a Feeling” — and people stepped out onto their balconies and fire escapes to listen.

When the band finished, and Upper West Siders shut their windows and headed back into their apartments, a 28-year-old Columbia University physics grad student named Ben Markham stood on the roof savoring the moment with a joint and beer.

“I was worried the cops might come,” he said. “If John was watching, I hope he liked it.”

Source: Alex Vadukul/nytimes.com

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Plenty of artists have toxic fans but few call them out in their own music. John Lennon was one of the few. In a single song, he attacked Christianity, the Hare Krishna movement, and the delusional fans who came to his door.

John Lennon | Harry Benson/Express/Getty ImagesWhen John Lennon equated the Beatlemania with religion

During his solo career, John dealt with a lot of his frustrations through song. Sometimes he discussed his dissatisfaction with the world in an accessible way, like in “Imagine.” Other times he went for the jugular.

In “I Found Out,” John attacks religion, telling people they shouldn’t look to Jesus Christ or Hare Krishna gurus to solve their problems for them. In addition, he says he’s “seen religion from Jesus to Paul.” The line itself is ambiguous, as the Paul in question could be Paul the Apostle or Paul McCartney. However, the Beatles Bible reports the lyric is about the latter, so John appears to be equating the Beatles fandom to a religion in that line. Fans often interpret “I Found Out” as a condemnation of people looking to religious figures or celebrities for salvation rather than themselves.

Source:enterta details

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