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Many bands are led by iconic lead singers, such as Freddie Mercury for Queen or Mick Jagger for The Rolling Stones. However, The Beatles were unique because they didn’t have an official leader. While John Lennon and Paul McCartney were responsible for most of The Beatles’ songs, George Harrison and Ringo Starr still made significant contributions. However, McCartney believed he was the “instigator” of The Beatles.

In an interview with The New York Times, McCartney reflected on the passing of George Harrison and the memories he had with the “Somebody” singer. One memory shared was when he hitchhiked with Harrison before The Beatles formed. He later got Lennon to join in during his “hitchhiking burst.”

“I often think of George because he was my little buddy,” McCartney said. “I was thinking the other day of my hitchhiking bursts. This was before the Beatles. I suddenly was keen on hitchhiking, so I sold this idea to George and then John.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles didn’t need Ringo Starr to be a songwriter. Paul McCartney and John Lennon took up those duties early in the band’s career. George Harrison grew his writing skills. Not being relied upon for songs lessened the pressure on the drummer, which Ringo said was a positive of being the fourth Beatle. Still, he attempted to write songs. When you go inside Ringo’s clunky songwriting process, it’s a miracle he ever got any tracks on Beatles albums.

The Beatles needed Ringo to be their drummer to become the Fab Four. His steady timekeeping skills were critical to the band. Ringo’s songwriting? Not so much.

When they weren’t covering songs, John and Paul teamed up to handle a lot of the early songwriting duties for the band. The duo retained that dynamic for much of The Beatles’ career.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Ringo Starr songs rarely made the cut on Beatles albums (he wrote two Fab Four tunes). His playing almost never received the credit it deserved, either. Ringo’s drumming — subtle and situated perfectly in the song — often made him the most overlooked member of The Beatles, and yet there were very few places in the world where nobody knew Ringo. Though often overlooked for his playing, Ringo’s weirdest drumming happened in the studio when George Harrison briefly quit the band.

Former drummer Pete Best lost interest in The Beatles when they went heavily psychedelic on 1967’s Magical Mystery Tour. Maybe he wasn’t listening to the Fab Four a year earlier.

Revolver was a watershed moment for the band as it moved away from the saccharine pop of their early days. The non-album B-side “Rain” was a big step into the Fab Four’s psychedelic period.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Badfinger liked January. The Apple Records signings had three UK Top 10 hits, each of which hit the British bestsellers in the first month of the year, for three years straight. On January 29, 1972, they debuted with the third of them, “Day After Day,” marking the second time they had a hit produced by a Beatle.

After having their debut chart entry “Come And Get It” written and produced by Paul McCartney, “Day After Day” (written by the group’s Pete Ham) was produced by George Harrison. He played some of the lead guitar on the track, while Leon Russell added piano; Badfinger had, of course, been part of George’s all-star Concert For Bangla Desh in New York the previous August, in which Russell also took part.

Source: Paul Sexton/yahoo.com

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The Beatles often advocated for peace with their music — and equality with their concerts. Here’s what Paul McCartney and the other Beatles said about the American Civil Rights Movement and being “honest about” their activism.

The Beatles sometimes made political statements with their music. “Get Back” acted as anti-immigrant satire and commentary on Britain’s attitude toward immigration. “Revolution,” co-written by Lennon, shared his thoughts on the global turmoil of the late 1960s.

“You say you got a real solution,” the lyrics state. “Well, you know / We’d all love to see the plan / You ask me for a contribution / Well, you know / We’re all doing what we can.”

According to Beatles Interviews, the interviewer mentioned one statement from the Beatles, where they said America was “a lousy country” for calling people who were Black the n-word. The artists stood behind their statements.

“This is it: that if you say anything against, say, the way Civil Rights gets treated over here, then there are bound to be extremist people who’ll think that we’re wrong for saying that colored peo details

The Beatles have influenced many artists in every genre. While Dolly Parton came from a vastly different background than The Beatles, she was still struck by one of their earliest hits in America that left her “feelin’ all kinds of emotions.”

In the early 1960s, The Beatles became one of the biggest artists in the U.K. “She Loves You” and “Please Please Me” were two early singles that put the band on the map in their native country. In 1963, The Beatles finally began to take over in the U.S. with “I Want to Hold Your Hand.”

The single was released in the U.S. with “I Saw Her Standing There” as the B-side. Its success in the U.S. marked the beginning of the British Invasion as the track peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the first Beatles song to achieve this accomplishment in the U.S. The track gained even more momentum after The Beatles performed it on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964.

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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Madonna’s success upset Paul McCartney. He discussed how television defined the perception of the Queen of Pop.
Madonna said The Beatles influenced her but she was more interested in other types of music.

Paul McCartney said he didn’t like when Madonna became a big star. Subsequently, he said she came across as a “goddess” to normal people. Notably, the Queen of Pop explained why she wasn’t too interested in The Beatles when she was young.According to the 2015 book Conversations with McCartney, the “Silly Love Songs” singer was upset by Madonna’s success. “It makes me realize how people are affected by media,” he said.

“While you’re looking at her, from your little lowly room, on your little telly, you think she’s a goddess,” he added. “You give her all of that. She doesn’t even ask for it.”

Paul discussed the Queen of Pop’s tours. “Once she’s on tour, she’s selling out 30,000, she’s a goddess,” Paul added. “‘Look at the clothes she wears. No wonder. It’s because she’s better than us. We are only mortal, we’ve got tellies, and I bet details

Ringo Starr has been performing on stage for over 60 years since he began his career with The Beatles. However, the British drummer said he still experiences stage fright, even if the fear disappears shortly after taking the stage.

Starr joined The Beatles in 1962 after the band struggled to find the perfect drummer. While still a pivotal member of the band, much of the attention was often on Paul McCartney and John Lennon as most of the songs were written and sung by them. When The Beatles ended in 1970, each member went in their own direction, including Starr.

After releasing several solo albums and songs, Starr formed the All-Starr band in 1989, who he continues to tour with today. However, unlike most bands, the All-Starr band consists of a constantly rotating set of musicians. In an interview with USA Today, the “Octopus Garden” singer explained why he decided to have a constantly changing band.

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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In 1964, The Beatles attended a party at the British Embassy in Washington D.C., and Ringo Starr left with less hair than when he entered. Despite the relative exclusivity of the party, fans there were still overzealous with the band. Starr explained that people began behaving badly after a couple of drinks. One fan even snipped the hair from his head.In 1964, the band brought Beatlemania to America with their performances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Shortly after, they traveled to the nation’s capital. After a show at the Washington Coliseum, they reluctantly agreed to attend a party at the British Embassy.“We always tried to get out of those crap things,” George Harrison said in the book The Beatles: The Authorized Biography by Hunter Davies. “But that time [in Washington] we got caught. They are always full of snobby people who really loathe our type, but want to see us because we’re rich and famous. It’s all hypocrisy. They were just trying to get publicity for the embassy.”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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In 1958, years before Beatlemania or even minor local success, Paul McCartney and George Harrison went on a hitchhiking trip around Wales. McCartney liked taking his bandmates, Harrison and John Lennon, on trips like these. He and Harrison befriended a local family, but they took something from their home. Years later, McCartney received a letter about the theft and apologized.

Harrison and McCartney met on the bus to school and bonded over their love of music. They became close, and McCartney started taking his younger friend on hitchhiking trips.

“I often think of George because he was my little buddy,” he told The New York Times in 2020. “I was thinking the other day of my hitchhiking bursts. This was before the Beatles. I suddenly was keen on hitchhiking, so I sold this idea to George and then John.”

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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Though George Harrison is best known for his music, he also had a hand in many movies. With his production company, HandMade Films, Harrison helped revitalize the British film industry. He became disenchanted with the industry after a number of financial setbacks, but those who knew him say he really fell out of love with it after working on an early film for the company. The challenges of working with director Terry Gillam on Time Bandits wore on Harrison.The controversial religious subject matter of Monty Python’s Life of Brian caused the film’s first backer to pull out at the last minute. Harrison was friendly with members of Monty Python, so when Eric Idle asked him for help, he agreed.

Source: Emma McKee/cheatsheet.com

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A star once said The Beatles’ “Love Me Do” was inspired by Big Mama Thornton’s “Hound Dog.” She also felt the song was inspired by Barrett Strong’s “Money (That’s What I Want).”
Paul McCartney and John Lennon discussed how the song came together.

A star once said The Beatles‘ “Love Me Do” was inspired by Big Mama Thornton’s “Hound Dog.” In addition, she felt the song was different from its inspirations. Notably, Paul McCartney and John Lennon both gave fans insight into the composition of “Love Me Do.”

Lulu is a singer known for her hits “To Sir with Love” and “Boom Bang-a-Bang,” as well as the title song from the James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. During a 2022 interview with The Guardian, she discussed hearing “Love Me Do” when it was new.

“When I was 13, we were obsessed with the radio in the way kids now are obsessed with TikTok,” she recalled. “When ‘Love Me Do’ came on it blew my mind. My teenage hormones were raging, and The Beatles looked so cute, not at all threatening.”

Source: Matthew Trzcins details

The Beatles performed to screaming fans in concert. You can see those fans in the audience of their Ed Sullivan Show performance too. Their first film, A Hard Day’s Night, showcased the fanfare that followed The Beatles even in their daily life. It also chronicled some of their bad habits, like smoking. The Criterion Collection edition of A Hard Day’s Night includes several documentaries about the making of the film. In one, producer Walter Shenson speaks about his efforts to stop The Beatles from smoking on film. He wasn’t entirely successful. A Hard Day’s Night came out in 1964. By this time, The Beatles’ following had crossed the pond, as it were, since they’d performed on Ed Sullivan at the beginning of the year. Shenson felt that The Beatles should be role models to their young fans.

Source: Fred Topel/cheatsheet.com

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Paul McCartney felt The Beatles’ “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” was “very Lennon.” The song hit differently for him after John’s death.
George Harrison praised the song during one of its many, many studio takes.

Paul McCartney met with Linda McCartney the same night as the recording of The Beatles‘ “Happiness Is a Warm Gun.” Subsequently, he said he couldn’t listen to the song the same way after John Lennon’s tragic death. Giles Martin, the son of Beatles producer George Martin, gave fans some interesting insight into the track.

In the 1997 book Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now, Paul discussed one of the early times he met Linda. “I said, ‘Come on over, then,’ and she arrived the night when we were doing ‘Happiness Is a Warm Gun,'” he recalled. “She arrived at the house and phoned, and I had [The Beatles’ road manager] Mal [Evans] go round to check that she was all right.

“She remembers the fridge had half a bottle of sour milk and a crust of cheese, a real British fridge,” Paul added. “She just couldn’t believe the conditions I was living in.”

Source: Matt details

John Lennon compared Double Fantasy to Apocalypse Now and the soap opera Dallas. He said he didn’t know how the album ended.
Three of the songs from Double Fantasy became top 10 singles in the United Kingdom.

John Lennon compared Double Fantasy to Apocalypse Now. In addition, he compared it to the soap opera Dallas. Notably, the album in question includes three of the famous tracks from his solo career.

The book All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono contains an interview from 1980. In it, John discussed his album Double Fantasy at length. For context, Double Fantasy is a collaboration between himself and Yoko, and both stars take the mic at different points in the record. He was asked if the album was very autobiographical.

“If you ask me that next year, I might have a different answer, but now I’ll say that it is completely autobiographical,” he said. “It’s about us over the last five or six years.”

Source: Matthew Trzcinski/cheatsheet.com

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Paul McCartney drew inspiration from many different sources as a songwriter. It is a technique he still employs over 60 years after starting his music career. However, the ideas for some of Paul’s songs came from unlikely origins, including a 1789 poem published by Elizabethan poet Thomas Dekker that he used to write a climactic Abbey Road song.

Of all The Beatles, Paul takes a very pragmatic approach to songwriting. He viewed it as a job, a means to an end to a new song. It was an approach he used when first writing songs with John Lennon.

“If I were to sit down and write a song, now, I’d use my usual method: I’d either sit down with a guitar or at the piano and just look for melodies, chord shapes, musical phrases, some words, a thought just to get started with,” he said in an interview with NPR.

“Then I sit with it to work it out, like writing an essay or doing a crossword puzzle. That’s the system I’ve always used that John [Lennon] and I started with,” he continued.

Source: Lucille Barilla/cheatsheet.com

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The Mamas & the Papas’ Michelle Phillips said The Beatles’ “Love Me Do” didn’t sound “proper.” She thought the song was awesome anyway. “Love Me Do” became a hit single three times in three decades in the United Kingdom.

The Mamas & the Papas’ Cass Elliot said she didn’t enjoy The Doors as much as The Beatles. Subsequently, The Mamas & the Papas’ Michelle Phillips discussed what she felt about The Beatles’ “Love Me Do.” Notably, the song reached No. 1 in the United States but not the United Kingdom.

During a 1968 interview with Rolling Stone, Elliot discussed her taste in music. “Like, today, I’d rather hear Jimi Hendrix,” she said. “Today.

“The Doors, for instance: I can’t really get into their music,” he added. “I find it very one-dimensional. True, it’s far out. But when you get there finally, it’s just in one. It doesn’t surround me or take me away, whereas The Beatles always have completely turned me on.”

Source: Matthew Trzcinski/cheatsheet.com

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The Beatles often experimented with various instruments and recording techniques. Their songs often sound different, partly due to The Beatles’ innovative tendencies. For example, George Harrison often incorporated the sitar into several tracks to generate a surreal sound. One of The Beatles’ more underrated songs was created by Paul McCartney, who was experimenting with a tape recorder.

“Rain” was released in 1966 as the B-side to their “Paperback Writer” single. Both songs were recorded during their Revolver sessions, but neither made the album. The song was written by John Lennon and is often considered one of The Beatles’ more underappreciated tracks.

The track is notable for its unorthodox recording techniques and the rapid drumming by Ringo Starr, who said “Rain” is the best drum performance of his career. In an interview with Conan O’Brien, Starr said it was the first and last time he played “that busy.”

Source: Ross Tanenbaum/cheatsheet.com

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John Lennon dreamed of a better world with “Imagine” — and criticized Britain’s attitude toward immigrants in the Beatles’ “Get Back.” Still, this songwriter described himself as “slightly cynical,” even if he doesn’t want to be labeled as a cynic. 

Lennon was a peace activist — even if he was “slightly cynical.” The Beatles became one of the world’s biggest bands comprised of “Fab Four” members Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison.

Lennon appeared as a Beatles songwriter, co-writing with McCartney and eventually branching out as a solo artist. In one interview, this songwriter described himself as “slightly cynical,” but he doesn’t want to be labeled exclusively as a cynic. 

During a 1966 interview with Look Magazine, Lennon elaborated on the sacrifices the Beatles made — especially in the beginning. They had to wear suits and shorten their hair to get jobs in London. As of 1966, the songwriter said his life is about the “truth as he sees it.”

“I’m not a cynic,” Lennon said (via Beatles Interviews). “They’r details

Sir Paul took the images during "an intense three-month period of travel" in 1963 and 1964 but believed they had been lost.

He said unearthing them had "plunged" him "right back" into the experience.

The photos will be shown at the National Portrait Gallery as part of its relaunch and published in a book.

Paul McCartney Photographs 1963-64: Eyes of the Storm will run between 28 June and 1 October as one of two major exhibitions that will launch the London gallery's summer programme.

The images document December 1963 to February 1964, a period which was an important one for the Liverpool band, taking in their meteoric rise to global superstardom, their record-breaking appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show and the four-piece's youngest member George Harrison's 21st birthday.

Source: BBC News

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The Beatles’ 1968 self-titled album had most of its songs written in the spring of that year when the band were at a Transcendental Meditation course in Rishikesh, India. From May to October, the Fab Four recorded the album at Abbey Road, where arguments broke out over creative differences. Tensions also weren’t helped by the continual presence of John Lennon’s new girlfriend Yoko Ono, who broke The Beatles’ rule of not having wives or partners in the studio. However, in a new interview, Sir Ringo Starr claimed that a song written for the record by Lennon reunited The Beatles, making them closer than ever before.

Source: George Simpson/express.co.uk

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Paul McCartney was in the eye of the storm, Beatlemania, in 1964 when his group took over the world.

Now it seems he’s found a treasure trove of photos he took on a 35mm camera when it all happened. A book is coming called “Eyes of the Storm” on June 13th, five days before Sir Paul’s 81st birthday.

The photos were taken in six cities: New York, Washington, London, Liverpool, Miami, and Paris. There are 275 pictures. The book will have an introduction by Paul, plus essays by Jill Lepore and Nicholas Cullinan.

Source: Roger Friedman/showbiz411.com

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Ringo Starr’s first tour as a solo artist was a big deal. Aside from a few one-off performances, he hadn’t played live since his time in The Beatles. Meaning that when the All-Starr Band debuted in 1989, it had been more than 20 years since the drummer toured. Ringo faced his fears on that tour as it was the first test of his newfound sobriety, but he inspired a fellow Rock & Roll Hall of Famer to embrace sobriety, too.The Beatles’ breakup wasn’t easy for Ringo. He lost the three people he routinely called his brothers as the Fab Four fractured in a storm of ego clashes and in-fighting. The drummer reached unprecedented heights with the band, and it was all gone by 1970.

Source: Jason Rossi/cheatsheet.com

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Previously unseen portraits taken by Paul McCartney at the outset of The Beatles’ fame will be displayed for the first time later this year.

The collection of 275 photographs will be shown to the public at the newly refurbished National Portrait Gallery (NPG) in London from June 28 to October 1. ‘Paul McCartney Photographs 1963-64: Eyes of the Storm’ comprises 35mm shots taken in London, Paris, Liverpool, Washington and New York between December 1963 and February 1964, as Beatlemania took hold worldwide.

McCartney previously thought he had lost the collection, but recently rediscovered it, leading him to approach the NPG in 2020. “He said he’d found these photographs that he remembers taking but thought had been lost,” said the gallery’s director, Nicholas Cullinan. “We sat down with him and began going through them. [It was] extraordinary to see these images – which are unseen – of such a well-documented, famous and important cultural moment.”

Source: Joe Goggins/uk.news.yahoo.com

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One of the most famous quotes attributed to John Lennon was never actually said by him.

At the height of their fame in the mid-1960s, the Beatles were the name on almost everyone's lips. The Fab Four member who caught more flack than the others, rather unfairly, was drummer Ringo Starr.

This is where one of the most famous misquotes of all time arises. John Lennon was known for his quick wit, and almost sarcastic responses to most questions from the media.

The story goes that when asked by a reporter whether Ringo was the best drummer in the world, Lennon reportedly responded: "he wasn’t even the best drummer in the Beatles."

Despite the high tensions at the time of the Fab Four's split, it seems unlikely John would disrespect his bandmate in this way, and that is because Lennon never actually said this.

The joke can be traced back to 1981, as pop culture journalist Tim Worthington discovered while listening to an old Radio 4 comedy series called Radio Active. He found the joke made by Philip Pope, who would later be known for his role in Spitting Image.

Source: Aaron Curran/liverpoolecho.co.uk

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