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The Beatles and the Rolling Stones are two of the greatest bands, not only in British history, but in rock history. Their first meeting is the stuff of legend. Here’s what went down when the two bands collided for the first time.

According to Ultimate Classic Rock, Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones remembers when he was performing at the Crawdaddy Club in 1963 and noticed the Beatles in the audience. “Halfway through the set we kind of glanced up, and there were four silhouetted leather-clad persons standing just in front of the bandstand in amongst all these kids who were all dancing and playing around.” He remembered that the Fab Four were “being totally ignored by the audience.”

According to Slate, he elaborated “We’re playing a pub … and we’re whacking out our show and everybody’s having a good time, ya know? I suddenly turn around: there’s these four guys in black leather overcoats standing there. Oh fuck me! Look who’s here!”

After noticing the Beatles, Wyman “turned round to Charlie [Watts], and I said, ‘It’s the Beatles!’ They’d had two or three big No. 1 hits and they were like the rave of details

'John Lennon: Final Year' Documentary Coming - Saturday, January 25, 2020

The final year of John Lennon’s life will be the subject of a new documentary timed to mark the 40th anniversary of the music legend’s death. John Lennon: The Final Year, from Reda Films, will include never-before-seen material and interviews with those who spent time with the slain Beatle during the last year of his life. Lennon died December 8, 1980, as a result of a fatal gunshot wound, while standing with his wife, Yoko Ono, in front of his apartment building on New York’s Upper West Side.

The film’s producer is noted Beatles author, Ken Womack of Wonderwall Communications. Womack’s forthcoming book, John Lennon 1980: The Final Days in the Life of Beatle John, will be published on Lennon’s birthday, Oct. 9. His most recent book was Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles, published in 2019 in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the release of Abbey Road.

Source: Best Classic Bands Staff

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JOHN LENNON and The Beatles drummer Ringo Starr last saw each other a matter of weeks before the Imagine hitmaker was tragically shot and died. In an interview the following year, Starr reflected on their final meeting, which was immortalised in a photo.

Their time together that day was enshrined forever in a polaroid picture. In an interview with Barbara Walters the year after Lennon’s death, Starr recalled the final time he saw his friend. “I saw him on the 15th November,” he said. “I was staying at The Plaza.

“Oh, man, they were happy. They were two people in one,” he added poignantly.

Source: headtopics.com

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George Harrison might have been the Beatles’ lead guitar participant, however that doesn’t imply he took each solo you hear in Fab Four songs. From early within the band’s run by the final Beatles album, you’ll discover songs that featured John Lennon or Paul McCartney taking solos.

In the case of “Taxman,” George’s composition that kicked off Revolver, Paul took the solo when George couldn’t nail down the half rapidly sufficient within the studio. On “Get Back,” John realized the lead as a result of George left the group throughout the Let It Be classes.

In different instances, John merely needed to provide a solo a go. “I like playing lead sometimes, so I do it,” he mentioned in 1964. After getting back from the band’s first tour of America, that’s what he did on ‘You Can’t Do That,” a monitor he’d written for A Hard Day’s Night. It turned his first solo on a Beatles launch.

Source: Jeremy Spirogis/sahiwal.tv

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They developed into the Fab Four; the most famous group in pop music history.

But were you aware that John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison – minus Ringo Starr – once toured the north east of Scotland as a backing group and were called The Silver Beetles?

Or that, during their visit, McCartney was known as Paul Ramon and Lennon had the words Long John appended to his name?

This was long before the days of the Fab Four, George Martin, and Sergeant Pepper, as the Liverpool group took the world by storm.

Instead, in the spring of 1960, the three youngsters backed singer Johnny Gentle on a series of gigs in Inverness, Fraserburgh, Keith, Forres, Nairn and Peterhead.

The gigs were staged at such venues as the Northern Meeting Ballroom in Inverness, Dalrymple Hall in Fraserburgh and The Rescue Hall in Peterhead, between May 20 and May 28. Some of the concerts were well-attended, but others attracted barely any audience at all.

And Lennon and McCartney returned home to Liverpool after losing money on the trip.

Source: pressandjournal.co.uk

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Around the time of the Beatles’ breakup, the band acquired a giant praise from Frank Sinatra. After protecting the Abbey Road observe “Something,” the Chairman of the Board took to singing the George Harrison tune in live performance. And Sinatra known as it “one of the best love songs written in 50 or 100 years.”

But by these days (the early ’70s), nobody would have been stunned by anybody protecting a Beatles tune. John Lennon and Paul McCartney, George’s outdated bandmates, had been about essentially the most well-known songwriters on this planet.

When Paul was a youngster, he truly appeared forward to days when somebody of Sinatra’s stature would sing his songs. In interviews for Anthology, Paul stated he even began out writing tracks with old-school crooners in thoughts.

“Back then I wasn’t necessarily looking to be a rock ‘n’ roller,” he stated. When the Fab Four recorded Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), Paul pulled out a observe from the times he imagined himself as considered one of Sinatra’s songwriters.

Source: Jeremy Spirogis/sahiwal.tv

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The Beatles’ 1969 album AbbeyRoad has gone on to become a defining moment in the illustrious career of one of the greatest bands to have ever walked the planet. It is one of the band’s rockiest records but it is on their isolated vocal that the album’s power shines through.

It was the band’s eleventh studio album and saw the Fab Four incorporates genres such as blues, rock and pop, and also makes prominent use of Moog synthesizer, sounds filtered through a Leslie speaker, and tom-tom drums. But the most fascinating part is the band’s varying vocals.

One thing that The Beatles have that most other bands could only hope for. The band had not only a group of quality musicians but of expert songwriters and wonderful singers. An iconic record on The Beatles’ roadmap, least of all because of its album artwork, it was another moment of creative elation as all four members took the wheel of the Yellow Submarine for a turn or two.

In the video below, brought to us by Leonardo Barbieri, we get to experience Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison all bring their songs to fruition. By stripping back the music and listening to their vocals alone, the connectio details

When not playing its own Branson, Missouri, theater, Liverpool Legends fits anywhere from the 1,000-seat Bama up to amphitheaters that seat 10,000, playing Carnegie Hall, or headlining at the Rose Bowl.

You’d have to be of a certain age to have witnessed Beatlemania live, the screaming drowning out drums and guitars, enough hair being yanked to fill a warehouse with Ringo wigs, sufficient ecstatic tears shed to float another pond between England and the colonies.

Frustrated with then-state-of-the-art speakers that couldn’t overcome the shrieking -- of fans, not guitars -- the Beatles last staged a concert tour in 1966.

For their final years, they focused on what became legendary studio albums: “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” “Magical Mystery Tour,” “Yellow Submarine,” “Abbey Road,” “Let It Be” and the self-titled double vinyl known as the White Album.

Source: Mark Hughes Cobb/tuscaloosanews.com

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In the early nineties, there was one former member of The Beatles that was breaking out from the shadow of one of the most famous bands the world has ever seen. For a time, George Harrison was a bonafide pop star.

Following 1987s commercial and critical success Cloud Nine, mostly buoyed by his mega-watt pop hit ‘I’ve Got My Mind Set On You’, George Harrison was a household name again for the first time since the 1970s All Things Must Pass.

His first record had ascertained Harrison his legendary status on his solo work alone but, despite all his experience, Harrison was never a big fan of touring after his 1974 tour. The pain of that tour with Ravi Shankar had clearly landed quite heavily on Harrison and for many years, despite commercial success, the Quiet Beatle was, for the main part, remaining quiet.

After sharing the stage in Los Angeles in 1990, Harrison was seemingly dipping his toe into the touring water when he joined the legendary Eric Clapton for a joint tour of Japan, the next year. It seemed as though the Beatle was gearing up for a tour. Yet after Harrison and Clapton performed at 12 shows across the land of the rising sun the guitarist would again retreat to his l details

John Lennon and Yoko Ono met in London in 1966 when The Beatles were at the height of their fame. She was having an exhibition of her work at a gallery when he came for a private viewing the day before it opened. The pair hit it off emotionally and intellectually, with the musician leaving fascinated by the avant-garde artist.

Lennon and Ono soon began corresponding and subsequently embarked on a romance.

Their relationship was the final straw for his first wife Cynthia Lennon and their marriage ended in 1968.

A year later, he tied the knot with Ono in Gibraltar.

It was shortly after he married Ono, however, that Lennon told his fellow Beatles he was leaving the band, leading to the group splitting for good.

Source: thefloridapost.com

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When the songs of John Lennon and Paul McCartney started topping the maps in England and America, it fundamentally put this course for The Beatles. From that time on, the songs of Lennon-McCartney — and their particular set of golden voices — will be the band’s power.

“Paul and I really carved up the empire between us,” John explained in Anthology. “Paul and I also performed most of the performing, most of the writing. George [Harrison] never ever composed a song till much later.”

When George performed start composing their own songs, their tracks got rush-jobs when you look at the studio. Beatles producer George Martin ultimately recognized the real difference. “He was never treated on the same level, as having the same quality of songwriting,” Martin stated.

Source: ourbitcoinnews.com

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John Lennon tragically died after being fatally shot by Mark Chapman outside his New York home in 1980. An icon of music, peace activist and father-of-two, The Beatles star’s left a huge mark on the world. In addition to his wife Yoko Ono, John’s ex and his son from his first marriage were also left grieving his loss.

In an unearthed interview with NPR’s Fresh Air, Cynthia Lennon opened up on a heart-wrenching moment shortly after he died.

Speaking in 1985, five years after John’s passing, she said she could see a lot of the Beatle in their son, Julian Lennon.

Asked if she found their physical likeness “eerie”, she replied: “Following John's death, I had an experience of coming downstairs in the house I lived in North Wales, and [Julian] was sitting at a piano with his back to me, and he was singing a very soulful song.”

Source:Minnie Wright/express.co.uk

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In 1964, The Beatles made a huge step towards fighting racial segregation by refusing to play a show that had split the audience without their consent.

Showing their support for the US civil rights movement, the iconic Liverpool four-piece refused to perform to a segregated concert at the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Florida. As the pressure of The Beatles’ act of defiance threatened to boil over, officials at the concert eventually allowed the segregated audience to merge together. Upon entering the stage, John Lennon said: “We never play to segregated audiences and we aren’t going to start now.”

“I’d sooner lose our appearance money,” he added.

Source: faroutmagazine.co.uk

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Former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman recalled the moment when he looked up during an early performance and saw the Beatles in the audience.

The iconic meeting took place at the Crawdaddy Club in the Station Hotel in Richmond, England, on April 14, 1963. The Beatles had already logged two No.1 U.K. hits – “Please Please Me” and “From Me to You” – while the Stones were still 14 months away from their first visit to the top of the charts with “It’s All Over Now,” as Wyman told Uncle Joe Benson on the Ultimate Classic Rock Nights radio show.

“Halfway through the set we kind of glanced up, and there were four silhouetted leather-clad persons standing just in front of the bandstand in amongst all these kids who were all dancing and playing around,” he said, noting that John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were “being totally ignored by the audience.” “I turned round to Charlie [Watts], and I said, ‘It’s the Beatles!’ They’d had two or three big No. 1 hits and they were like the rave of England at that time.

Source: ultimateclassicrock.com

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When you hear The Beatles called “the Fab Four,” you might picture an “all-for-one” scenario in which the band members worked as equals. That was certainly true in some respects, especially early on in the Beatles’ existence. However, in the studio, commercial forces tended to take over.

Geoff Emerick, who worked as the Beatles’ chief engineer on their greatest albums, summed it up in his book, Here, There and Everywhere. “Even from the earliest days, I felt the artist was John Lennon and Paul McCartney, not The Beatles,” Emerick wrote.

On top of the Lennon-McCartney compositions fueling the band’s stardom, Emerick cited the regular mistakes George Harrison and Ringo Starr made in the studio. While Emerick acknowledged George’s eventual growth as a guitarist, he wasn’t impressed by his playing on numerous dates.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Through song, John Lennon attacked Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism. George Harrison’s music made it clear he was a devout Hindu. Paul McCartney, on the other hand, did not make his religious beliefs (or lack thereof) a major part of his art. This raises the question: What are the former Beatles’ religious views?

If you listen to one of the Beatles’ most famous compositions, “Eleanor Rigby,” you’ll notice there’s some passing references to Christianity. One of the verses mentions a priest named Father McKenzie who delivers a sermon no one hears. In the song, Paul sings “No one was saved.”

The song could be interpreted as a lament over the lack of religiosity in contemporary Britain. At the very least, the song’s melancholy music makes Father McKenzie, the ineffectual priest, seem like a tragic and sympathetic character. However, Paul doesn’t have many nice things to say about religion.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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The official and verified Instagram account of the world-famous rock band, The Beatles, has shared a really rare photo of all the bandmates on their verified social media account.

In the photo, all the members were looking very attractive and happy. You may notice that someones were smoking when taken the photo.

And also, the Instagram account of The Beatles has captioned a never-heard-before section from the interview of John Lennon. In the interview of John Lennon, he was explained why The Beatles were so special for himself.

Here’s the section of John Lennon:

Source: Ugur Ustaer/metalheadzone.com

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John Lennon’s now famous “lost weekend” with May Pang was the subject of much attention and speculation from The Beatles fans back in the early 1970s, when he left his home with wife Yoko Ono in New York to set up house with their assistant May Pang in Los Angeles. Having first met Ono in 1966, Lennon married the avant-garde artist three years later. However, by 1973, the couple’s relationship had problems.

Ono has since recalled how the intensity of their partnership and the constant vitriol they faced from The Beatles fans — who largely blamed her for the break-up of the band — left her “needing space”.

It was at this point that Lennon, with his wife’s knowledge, embarked on a year-and-a-half romance with their assistant, Pang, whom Ono described in a 2012 interview with The Telegraph as “a very intelligent, attractive woman and extremely efficient”.

Source: Minnie Wright/express.co.uk

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The Beatles original drummer Pete Best has said that John, Paul and George continued to "put the boot in" even after they had dismissed him from the band and replaced him with Ringo Starr.  

Best (78) first met the Beatles, who were then called The Quarrymen, in 1959 when they played some of their first gigs at his mother's club, The Casbah, in suburban Liverpool and later joined the band in August 1960 after a phone call from Paul McCartney.

He went on to perform with them over 220 times, including many shows during their long stint in Hamburg. However, in what is perhaps showbusiness’s biggest bad luck story, the rest of the band kicked him out just as super stardom beckoned.  

Speaking on the Late Late Show on Friday night, Best, who has Irish relatives in Limerick and Dublin, said, "They could’ve been nicer, they put a load of boots in," he said.

Source: Alan Corr/rte.ie

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Help! The owner of a scary collection of waxwork heads is selling off the bonce of Beatles guitar legend George Harrison.

Colin Hill bought it for less than £200 five years ago and keeps it in a cabinet along with the heads of Britney Spears, Winston Churchill and a barely recognisable Princess Diana.

And the Fab Four fan hopes to make thousands if his sale plan can Come Together.

Retired hospital worker Colin, 59, waxes lyrical about his collection. He says: “At the auction they also had Ringo’s head but I was outbid for that. I don’t know what happened to Paul and John’s heads.

“It would have been nice to get both of them. They were from Madame Tussauds and had been left in a storeroom.

Source: Phil Cardy/mirror.co.uk

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Highly acclaimed since it made its stage debut in 2006, LOVE is a theatrical production by Cirque du Soleil which combines the re-produced and re-imagined music of The Beatles with an interpretive, circus-based artistic and athletic stage performance.

A joint venture between Cirque du Soleil and The Beatles’ Apple Corps Ltd, the three-time Grammy Award winning LOVE is described as “a Rock ‘n’ Roll poem”, inspired by the poetry of the Beatles’ lyrics and brought to life by a cast of world-class aerialists, acrobats and dancers. Music Director Giles Martin, son of the legendary Beatles producer, Sir George Martin, has heightened LOVE’s listening experience with a completely remixed soundtrack, noting “The show is the closest anyone can get to being in the studio with the band.”

The show plays at a specially built theatre at the Mirage in Las Vegas and uDiscover Music caught up with two Cirque du Soleil members, actor Uys De Buisson and acrobat Sophia Singleton, to discuss how The Beatles’ music connects with the LOVE cast. You can watch it in full below, but to whet your appetite, scroll down to read a few choice extracts.

Source: Tim Peacock/udis details

After the innovative Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), you might have believed The Beatles would keep topping themselves with every project. Then the band released the Magical Mystery Tour TV film on Boxing Day ’67.

Almost immediately, fans began phoning the BBC to say how much they hated what they’d seen. Going by the BBC’s reaction index, Magical Mystery Tour had the worst rating in history (23 out of 100). Critics pounced on the film as well, describing it as “rubbish,” “piffle,” or worse.

With the lack of plot and a considerable dose of psychedelia, The Beatles acknowledged they might have asked too much of its holiday audience. However, the BBC had its share of blame as well — it had shown a color film in black-and-white.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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While The Beatles had several peaks together collectively, the band members didn’t always see it that way. Take Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which is often called the greatest album of all time. Neither George Harrison nor Ringo Starr had a great time making that record.

George described being bored by the “assembly process” the band went through during the Sgt. Pepper sessions. For his part, Ringo wasn’t thrilled about all the sitting-around the band did making the album. (He compared it to being a session musician.)

On “She’s Leaving Home,” Ringo didn’t even have a drum part to play. Overall, Sgt. Pepper was very much a Paul McCartney project. That hints at another reason Ringo didn’t enjoy making the album.

In an interview published in the Anthology project, Ringo said he generally preferred playing songs John Lennon wrote to those penned by Paul. It was a matter of the songwriters’ individual styles.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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Ringo, Paul, John — and Eric?! Perhaps no other band in history is quite as synonymous with the first names of its members as the Beatles. But at one point, George Harrison walked out on the band — and at the top of the list to replace him: Eric Clapton.

The guitarist first met the Fab Four when he was in the band the Yardbirds, who were a supporting act for one of their headlining shows in 1964.

That led to a connection so strong that straddled both the Beatles' professional and personal lives. Clapton didn’t just collaborate with the band as a whole, but he also played with each of the four members independently on their solo endeavors. On top of that, he became best friends with Harrison — and they even ended up sharing an ex-wife, Pattie Boyd.

Source: biography.com

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You’ll sometimes hear Beatles fans referring to a Fab Four record as “perfect.” Given the power of the songwriting, production, and individual performances, it’s not hard to understand what they mean. But from a technical standpoint, band’s recordings were far from perfect.

In some cases, The Beatles intentionally made a recording flawed. Geoff Emerick, the band’s longtime engineer, explained how it worked in the book Here, There and Everywhere. “When someone made a mistake and the others liked it, we’d often make it louder [during mixing] to accentuate it.”

On the Abbey Road album, you find an example of what Emerick was talking about on “Polythene Pam.” In the middle of that track, which was part of the Side Two medley, Paul McCartney made a mistake playing his bass part.

Source: cheatsheet.com

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