Beatles News

PHOENIX -- When attending a concert, especially in a large arena, most of us would just be happy with a shout-out from our favorite rock star. But for one Phoenix couple, the Paul McCartney concert at US Airways Arena Tuesday was a night to remember. Adam Kowal and Andrea Copado have a wedding planned for Oct. 11. Copado read on the Internet that McCartney was ordained, and with their seats in the sixth row, they decided to make a sign that read, "You're ordained, we're engaged, please marry us tonight!" "We put together that poster and just hoped that he would acknowledge us and see our sign. We would have been happy," Kowal told News/Talk 92.3 KTAR's Mac & Gaydos Thursday.

"We were amazed when an usher came by and invited us to come backstage and meet him." In between his encores, McCartney stopped the concert and brought the couple on stage. As it turned out, McCartney is not actually ordained, but that didn't stop him from having them recite their vows in front of 10,000 people, followed by a big kiss. And as for that October wedding? "We're going to send him an invitation details

On August 19, 1964, I was woken up at my home in Los Angeles by the phone ringing at six in the morning. It was my editor in London calling to give me the assignment of a lifetime. He wanted me to fly up to San Francisco to cover - from start to finish - a hot British rock 'n' roll group making their first concert tour of North America. The Beatles had landed. That summer I was the 25-year-old West Coast correspondent of the Daily Express charged with chronicling the vagaries of Hollywood which ranged from the marriages of Elizabeth Taylor to the divorces of Marlon Brando and Cary Grant. Thrown in for good measure was an earthquake, a riot and a shipwreck. But The Beatles looked set to create a sensation to outstrip all these. After all only six months earlier they appeared on the country's most popular variety hour The Ed Sullivan Show and became an instant hit drawing 74 million viewers.

That said, I raced up to San Francisco with little conception that what I was to witness in 24 cities over the next five weeks would be one of the most amazing experienc details


After dealing with several decades’ worth of pedestrians clogging the crosswalk at Abbey Road, local officials are mulling over hiring a crossing guard to keep would-be Beatles from being mowed down by motorists. The BBC reports that the Westminster City Council recently met to discuss the possibility, quoting a representative who cautioned that no decisions have been made. “Local Abbey Road ward councillors raised their residents’ concerns about the number of tourists spilling into the road and traffic near the crossing at the height of the summer season, and put forward various suggestions, asking the city council to review pedestrian safety and crowd management,” he said. “However, no proposals have been agreed by the council, nor the review completed.” As we previously recalled, the Beatles shot the cover photo for their ‘Abbey Road’ LP in that crosswalk on Aug. 8, 1969, inspiring countless others who’ve posed for their own version of the image over the years. “I come here all the time and it&rsq details

Paul McCartney has revealed a previously-unseen picture of The Beatles from the band’s last ever official gig at Candlestick Park, San Francisco in 1966. The image shows the Fab Four walking across the grounds of the park, wearing sharp suits, with John, Paul and George each carrying their guitars, while Ringo walks ahead. They are flanked by police and officials, with floodlights illuminating their path across the stadium. McCartney released the image after playing to an audience of 50,000 at the same stadium on Thursday night for Farewell To Candlestic: The Final Concert. The show marked the final performance at the venue, which is closing after 54 years. Although The Beatles’ last ever concert was an impromptu show that took place on the rooftop of the Apple headquarters on Saville Row in 1969, their last official gig was held at Candlestick Park, and on Thursday night McCartney played the song the band had ended on, “Long Tall Sally” by details

The Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) will present starting Friday a pop-up exhibit of nine photos taken from the Beatles' first Seattle concert in 1964. The display, which will be found in MOHAI's Grand Atrium, commemmorates the 50th anniversary of the rock legends' Northwest leg of their visit, made during their first trip to the United States. Taken by Timothy Eagan, the images capture the Aug. 21, 1964 concert at the Seattle Center Coliseum. Eagan, who would later become a P-I staff photographer, was 19 years old when he took the photos. In addition to the pop-up exhibit, MOHAI will add 27 images to its online photo archives for public access. In all, 80 negatives were donated to MOHAI by Timothy Eagan's brother, Mike Eagan.

The display will run through Sept. 1. Take a peek at a few of the featured photos, along with some other photos chronicling The Beatles' stay at the Edgewater during that same tour stop. Moreover, Seattle Center will host a Beatles Week starting Monday, including Beatles-themed activities at the Seattl details

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) --Traffic was so bad for Candlestick Park's last show that some fans heading to watch Paul McCartney actually gave up and went home without seeing him. There were people who say they felt like the traffic was worse than other events and that it felt like someone dropped the ball. McCartney put on an amazing show to send Candlestick Park out in style. Fans who did make it say they loved the show and that McCartney played about 40 songs. He waited about an hour to go on because the stadium was only half full at 8 p.m. due to traffic problems. There were still many people that didn't make it because they said they were stuck on the highway for hours. Those who made it in say it wasn't easy getting out, but say it was worth it because they loved the show.

"The show was epic and then we got back to our car about midnight, we did not move for two full hours. So it was two hours and 45 minutes to make the 20-minute drive from Candlestick to Redwood City," Whit details

The Beatles ended their disappointingly short set on Aug. 29, 1966, at Candlestick Park with a barely-audible-above-the-screams version of "Long Tall Sally." Just before the band hopped in an armored car on that day, John Lennon promised "We'll see you next year!" More than half a lifetime later (17,512 days to be exact), Paul McCartney returned to Candlestick for what will probably be the last major event at the 54-year-old concrete edifice. The Beatles never played a commercial show again, but McCartney arranged his schedule to send the stadium off, with a pre-demolition show that few in attendance will forget. The key word there is "in attendance." Some of the worst Bay Area event traffic in recent memory forced thousands of concertgoers to say goodbye to Candlestick from an idling car outside the stadium. McCartney did his best to accommodate the stragglers, starting at 9 p.m. and playing a nearly 2 1/2 hour show with more than 30 songs.

The set list was familiar to anyone who has seen the ex-Beatle in recent years. But McCartney seemed details

A DOCUMENTARY photographer from Faversham is ready to present his photos of John Lennon to Yoko Ono. John Stewart Farrier has now teamed up with Faversham’s Maihen Picture Framing Company, in West Street, to finalise the piece. The photos of John Lennon were taken almost 50 years ago by Mr Farrier and were previously unseen until a few years ago. There are twelve pictures of the former Beatle, the negatives of which were left undiscovered in a loft for around 45 years. Mr Farrier discovered them towards the end of 2011 and they went on display for the first time earlier this year at The Proud Gallery in Chelsea, London. He now intends to present the photographs to Lennon’s wife Yoko Ono at The Folkestone Triennial, where she will be featuring as an artist.

Mr Farrier has selected Maihen Picture Framing Company to frame his photographs for Yoko. He said: “Most of my photographic framing is prepared in London, but I was delighted to discover a real gem on my doorstep in Faversham. “Rachael Barrow offered infectious enthusiasm with great attention to de details

Collectors of Paul McCartney’s music may have to add a new format – a version of PlayStation or Xbox — to their stacks of LPs, tapes, CDs, DVDs and digital downloads. His next major project is the score for Destiny, the highly anticipated video game from Bungie and Activision, due on Sept. 9. For the last four years, on and off, Mr. McCartney has been working on the score for the game in a collaboration with Marty O’Donnell  – until recently Bungie’s house composer, responsible for the widely praised Halo soundtracks – and Mike Salvatori. He has also written a theme song for the game, which he plans to release as a single soon after the game is released, said Lev Chapelsky, the general manager of Blindlight, a Los Angeles company that puts musicians and game companies together.

Mr. McCartney’s involvement with the project began in 2010, when Mr. O’Donnell, already at work on t details

The Dream Weaver and Really Wanna Know You hitmaker will publish Dream Weaver: Music, Meditation, and My Friendship with George Harrison in October (14). A press release announcing the new book reads: "Dream Weaver is ultimately a story of a spiritual journey and Gary's lifelong friendship with George Harrison. At 33, Gary Wright was at the highest point in his career. His album, The Dream Weaver, had been on top of the charts for months with two hit singles - Dream Weaver and Love is Alive - and during the summer of '76, he was part of a massive arena tour with Peter Frampton and Yes. "Earlier, while still living in England, he recorded music with legendary musicians Eric Clapton, B.B King, and George Harrison, who would later become one of his best friends.

"In Dream Weaver: Music, Meditation, and My Friendship with George Harrison, Wright illuminates key moments in his journey and offers an insider's look at a tumultuous and revolutionary time in both the music and spiritual realms. Wright details how he formed the legendary rock group Spooky Tooth, and how his clo details

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