Beatles News

If only, even for one day, you could blink yourself back in time — to when you felt freest, when you felt boldest, when the sheer power of youth made you certain you'd succeed

. More than half a century ago, as the Beatles took the world by storm, a group of teenage girls made a pact. They would find a way to meet their idols, face to face, when the band arrived in L.A.

Who cared that theirs was a dream shared by a million screaming, bawling fans? These girls didn't cry. They plotted and succeeded, pulling off a caper so audacious that Life magazine pinpointed it as the moment when "Beatlemania reached its apogee."

Who wouldn't want to try to relive that glory?

And so even though one of their crew, Sue Candiotti, said she couldn't make it, Paula (Glosser) McNair, 67, flew in from Salt Lake City, and Californians Kay (Zar) Crow, 66, and Michele "Mikki" Tummino, 67, made their way south, determined to recapture the thrill of their wild quest.

Crow remembers its start, lying in her bedroom in 1964, listening to her little gray Zenith transistor radio, hearing "I wanna hold your hand..." In seconds, the Hamilton High 15-year-old was dialing a friend on her turquoise Princess phone, conv details

Much of what the average rock aficionado knows about the break up of the Beatles comes from either Jann Wenner’s interviews with John Lennon or from casual attention during those years to news reports about the legal hassles the Fabs endured while extricating themselves from their partnership in Apple. Like any break up, personal or professional, (and this was both the severing of an indescribably successful musical collaboration and the splintering of friends who’d been almost inseparable since childhood), the Beatles’ demise was messy and hurtful for all involved.

Tom Doyle’s superb book Man on the Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970’s fell into my hands as a birthday present from my beloved sister a few days ago and I dropped my usual reading to devour it, both because I wanted to make sure my sister knew I appreciated her thoughtfulness and because I will read anything written with something approaching competence about The Beatles generally and Paul McCartney specifically. Hell, I even read the incompetent stuff.

This book is as good as any I’ve ever read on these subjects. Kudos to Tom Doyle and to my sister Janis.

Doyle is a good journalist as well as a good writer details

The Beatles Symposium returns with a powerful lineup of experts on the Fab Four, according to organizers of the Beatles at the Ridge Festival. The symposium helps kick off the annual music festival in downtown Walnut Ridge Sept. 18-19.

Among the highlights at this year’s symposium will be an on-air presentation from Beatles experts Richard Buskin and Robert Rodriguez. They produce a popular podcast, “Things We Said Today,” which they will do live at the symposium.

Another recent addition is vendor Bud Loveall, who is bringing his Beatles Shop from Austin, Texas. Loveall is noted for his supply of Beatles memorabilia, T-shirts, books and other items.

Symposium headliners include Ivor Davis, who traveled with the Beatles on their North American tour in 1964, and Seth Swirsky, the filmmaker who created the movie “Beatles Stories.”

Davis was the only journalist to join the Beatles for all 34 days of their first American tour, and he was also the only newspaper writer invited to accompany the Beatles for the “Rock and Roll Summit,” when the band finally met Elvis Presley in Los Angeles in 1965.

In 2014, Davis broke his long silence and shared the &ldqu details

OK, so the real Fab Four never performed in Edmonton.

However, wax versions of John, Paul, George and Ringo did briefly touch down at the airport.

“The Beatles! Travelling second class?” read the headline on a story about the Beatles arriving at 11:55 p.m. aboard an Air Canada flight from Vancouver to Toronto.

“The mop-topped singers claimed row five, economy section of the flight. What’s more, there were no screaming, crying masses to greet them — only a handful of newsmen and photographers. They were the Beatles from Victoria’s London Wax Museum — John, Paul, George and Ringo in life-size wax images.”

The wax figures were en route to the Montreal Ville Marie Wax Museum, where they were to be displayed for an indefinite period.

The real Beatles were in Toronto, where they had picked up $100,000 for two brief shows for 36,000 wildly cheering teenagers.

How did the other passengers take to travelling with the fake Fab Four? “It’s all right,” quipped one, “as long as they do not start talking back.” Edmonton was swept up in Beatlemania that summer.

“You could tell by the hair,” the Jour details

While the youth of today may know him better as the old guy from that Rihanna video, there are plenty of fans from other generations that would be excited to see Paul McCartney live — and they're in luck.

Macca will be continuing his world travels on the "Out There" tour this fall, and he has now confirmed a Toronto date at the Air Canada Centre on October 17.

"I am pleased to welcome Sir Paul McCartney to perform in our city," said Toronto Mayor John Tory in a press release. ‎"One of my first acts as Mayor was to get to work on making Toronto a more music friendly city, and hosting an artist like Sir Paul McCartney is another example of how growing the music culture in Toronto is delivering results. Music not only creates jobs, it attracts investment, and I will continue to focus on making music an integral part of the cultural and economic fabric of our city."

McCartney will be performing hits from across his decades-spanning career, including beloved hits from his work with the Beatles and Wings, as well as solo material. The press release also notes that attendees can expect "massive screens, lasers, fireworks, unique video content and, of course, the best songs in the world."


It’s a been a booming era for rediscovered Beatles photos, from the famous lost Beatles photographs taken by their tour manager to Linda McCartney’s tender portraits to Harry Benson’s luminous black-and-white photos of the Fab Four.

On this day in 1969, two days after their final recording session, the Beatles gathered at Tittenhurst Park, where John Lennon and Yoko Ono resided, for a photo shoot they didn’t realize would be their last — an instance of those bittersweet “unknown lasts” that wedge themselves between our lived experience and our memory, sometimes violently and other times with the tender wistfulness of nostalgia.

The cast of characters on that fateful August 22, captured by photographers Ethan Russell and Monte Fresco and Beatles assistant Mal Evans, included the Fab Four, Yoko Ono, a very pregnant Linda McCarney (a photographer herself), Apple Corps’ press officer Derek Taylor, Paul McCartney’s sheepdog Martha, and two donkeys Lennon and Ono kept on the property.

"Linda shot some 16mm footage on my camera. That turned out to be the last film taken.” ~ Paul McCartney

"It was just a photo session. I wasn’t there think details

A Minneapolis Tribune summer intern shared John Lennon’s potato chips in a Minneapolis hotel in August 1965 -- 50 years ago -- after posing as a hotel waitress, and got a front-page story out of it.

Holly (previously Susan) Stocking, now a retired professor of journalism at Indiana University, was a reporting intern at the Minneapolis Tribune in the summer of 1965 when the Beatles came to visit. Their one and only concert in Minnesota was on August 21, 1965 – 50 years ago. Stocking dressed up as a waitress at the hotel where the band was staying, in hopes of getting access to the band. Here is the story of her encounter – and how John Lennon took pity on a fledgling reporter, enabling her to get a page-one story, transcribed word-for-word below.

Monday, August 23, 1965

By Susan Stocking, Minneapolis Tribune Staff Writer

I didn’t faint, I didn’t scream. I didn’t even squeal. I ate potato chips. In a room with Beatles Ringo Starr, George Harrison and John Lennon – and all I did was munch potato chips! And nervously slop coffee in their saucers. “Half up,” said Lennon, sprawling on the blue spread of a bed in Room 528 of the Leamington Motor Inn. details

The Pacific National Exhibition (PNE) is banking on a priceless collection of Beatles memorabilia – most of it never before shown to the public – to boost what has been sagging attendance for its annual summer fair.

“The collection is probably worth about $100 million but it’s hard to put a price on it,” PNE spokeswoman Laura Ballance told Business in Vancouver.

“Jim Pattison bought John Lennon’s Rolls Royce in the 1980s for $2.5 million and that’s in our display of more than 200 items – many of them never seen before on display. Who knows what that car would sell for at auction today.”

The 105th annual Fair at the PNE opens August 22, which will be the 51st anniversary of the Beatles’ 1964 concert at Empire Stadium on the PNE grounds.

Five avid collectors of Beatles memorabilia recently came together and decided to pool their collections to start showing them in museums. The PNE was in discussions with that quintet’s exhibit company and it was agreed that the Fair at the PNE  could be the first place where the items would be shown, Ballance said.

The items, which are part of an exhibit named the Magical Mystery details

Know Your NME - Thursday, August 20, 2015

THE NME, once the Accordion Times and Musical Express, then the New Musical Express, is changing. The weekly publication, which currently sells about 15,000 copies, will be distributed free at train stations, shops and student unions around the country. Its content will expand to cover film, fashion, TV, politics and gaming.

Few believe that that it will last long, even if it outlived its rivals Sounds and Melody Maker. The title, once full of critical reviews and good writing, is likely to become another freesheet repository for slick self-serving PR handouts.

It is just one more indication that the world of popular music, always a battle between those who want to make music and those who just want to make money, has suffered another setback.

Today, when bands so often seem to be created by a team of smooth marketing people or cynically put together to win the latest TV talent show, it’s hard to believe just how many bands and groups there were in the late 1950s and ’60s scrabbling to make music and, if truth be told, to make it big in what would become the world of rock ’n’ roll.

Back in July ’57 a skiffle group called The Quarry Men entertained at St Peter’s details

Fan, secretary, family friend - Thursday, August 20, 2015

Freda Kelly’s father was “old school,” she says, and so was John Lennon’s Aunt Mimi. More below about the other Beatle parents, but Mary Elizabeth Smith, who raised Lennon in middle-class gentility, indeed had a stern reputation. Still, she generally smiled for the camera, while Freda’s dad had the look of a friendly Irish farmer or Christian Brother.

He didn’t think much, though, of the leather-clad rockers known as the Beatles. “He’d approve of anybody with a suit and tie,” recalled his daughter.

We learn all of this from an absolute gem of a documentary, “Good Ol’ Freda,” which has been shown at venues all over America and is now available via livestreaming or disc on Netflix.

In 1961, the secretary of the Beatles fan club acquired a boyfriend and passed on her job to Freda Kelly, a fellow Liverpool teenager and regular at the group’s lunchtime gigs at the Cavern Club. She hung out with them there in the band room and she’d telephone Paul McCartney at home to request a song for a friend’s birthday the next day or approach him for money owed on postage.

The 16-year-old had left school and was working in a details

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