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This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the release of “Revolver,” the greatest album by The Beatles, the greatest band of the modern era. Its best song, “For No One,” the best composition by this era’s best songwriter, Paul McCartney, is a 122-second triumph. It starts suddenly. No instrumental introduction to get the ear ready for the melody or the mind ready for the lyrics. We awake in a flash: “Your day breaks / Your mind aches.

It’s a not uncommon trick, this jarring start; perfect for when the writer wants to set a tone from the jump. Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong uses it to establish the punk twitchiness of the melodic marvel “Basket Case.” Squeeze uses it to foreshadow the climactic theme of “Pulling Muscles (From the Shell).” Like McCartney, Kesha (!) uses it in “TiK ToK” to start the day (“Wake up in the morning / Feelin’ like P-Diddy”)&dmash;though, admittedly, to tell about a very different kind of day.

What sets “For No One” apart, though, is the sudden sorrow. The Beatles used a similar approach in Lennon’s superb “Help!” The instant exclamation “Help details

Another Beatles book? You’d be forgiven for thinking there couldn’t possibly be anything left to be written about the Fab Four. Every aspect of their career has been excavated and explored in print so many times. With the exception of Bob Dylan, surely no popular musicians have been subject to such extensive investigation.

However, this latest addition to the canon offers perspective on the band that is as interesting as it is infuriating. Interesting because it considers some of the major legal spats involving the band in their lifetime; infuriating because time after time in Stan Soocher’s obsessively detailed book, one is left with the feeling that as songwriters the Beatles may have had rare talent, but as businessmen they were naive to the point of stupidity.

The book’s strength lies in the ability of its author, an academic and entertainment business attorney, to apply his knowledge of the law to existing files and recently released documentation. Winnowing out irrelevances, he draws some of the remaining threads together into a clearly constructed narrative, which can be read as three simple sub-narratives: the business chaos during the Brian Epstein era; the rise in legal wranglin details

A photograph of the late Beatle George Harrison celebrating his 21st birthday in Los Angeles is expected to attract worldwide attention.

The 1964 colour image shows George, dressed in a blue shirt and grey trousers, opening a huge ‘key to the door’ to celebrate the milestone.

The back of the picture is captioned: ‘George Harrison of the Beatles. 21st birthday party in Los Angeles 1964’. A mystery man can be seen strumming a guitar behind the Liverpool musician.

The lot will go on sale with Suffolk auctioneers Martlesham on February 18 with a catalogue guide price of between £30-£50.

Auctioneer Chris Elmy said: “This picture has travelled a long way from Los Angeles and will, no doubt, continue its journey as there are collectors of Beatles memorabilia all over the world.”

By: Laura Tacey

Source: Liverpool Echo

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Why Ringo rules - Thursday, February 04, 2016

With the welcome news that Ringo Starr & His All Star Band are set to play Cross Insurance Center in Bangor on June 8, it’s a good time to assess some of Starr’s greatness. The Beatles would not have been the group we know today without him.

For starters, he completed the group. They truly became The Beatles when Ringo officially joined the band in August 1962, four years after John, Paul and George began playing together. When Ringo accepted the job, the chemical reaction synthesized by the coming together of those precise personalities created a form of divine magic that can never be duplicated.

Ringo: “Every time he (Pete Best, previous Beatles drummer) was sick, they would ask me to sit in.”

George Harrison: “I was the one responsible for getting Ringo in the group. Every time Ringo played with us, the band just really swung then. I did conspire to get Ringo in and talk to John and Paul until they came around to the idea.”

Paul McCartney: “We really started thinking that we needed THE great drummer in Liverpool. And the great drummer in our eyes was this guy called Ringo Starr.”

By: Mike Dow

Source: The Main Edge

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Whisper it quietly but music royalty Sir Paul McCartney may put in an appearance at this year's Concert At The Kings in All Cannings, near Devizes. There have been rumours that McCartney would take to the stage at Rock Against Cancer since it was first held five years ago. But this time co-organiser John 'Grubby' Callis believes it could happen. And as Grubby is McCartney's sound engineer he should know. He said on Friday: "He has the date and he has promised me that he will appear one year. This is our fifth anniversary so why not this year. But I doubt we will know until very near the time."

Last year McCartney did not make it to All Cannings to join the likes of Lindisfarne and Squeeze but Mr Callis revealed he had made a substantial donation to the event which raises money for a number of cancer charities and local good causes.

The first four concerts have raised a total of more than £112,000 and there are high hopes that this year's on May 21 will be even more successful. It has grown hugely since Mr Callis along with Kings Arms landlord Richard Baulu and Andy Scott guitarist with The Sweet came up with the idea.

By: Joanne Moore

Source: Gazette and Herald

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How do you like your Beatles? Mark Bryant’s second annual Beatlefest at the Spire this last Friday and Saturday served them up in four distinct flavors and no one went away hungry.

First up Friday night were the inimitable local favorites, 3rd Left, who offered a variety of Lennon-McCartney tunes – and one Wing’s hit, raw.

That is not to say their music was undercooked but, rather, as fresh as possible and a packed house that was decidedly older than their usual fans went wild for every serving.

“That reaction was well deserved,” Bryant told the Old Colony this week, as he began to assess the weekend’s mania. “They always step it up, but when things are on the line that’s the band you want.”

Bryan recalled how last year after 3rd Left’s show an “older gentlemen” approached him and said that the band’s passionate performance had literally brought tears to his eyes.

This past Friday a packed house was a bit emotional as well, on their feet for almost every song the local band played, from their opening saxophone-guitar “Blackbird” duet, through spectacular renditions of “While My Guitar Gently We details

"Thank you, NME, for this great honour. I accept this as your encouragement for me to keep making my 'Sound of Music'." That’s what Yoko Ono – icon, artist, activist and musician – said of the ‘Lifetime Inspiration Award’ she will pick up the NME Awards with Austin, Texas on February 17. The ceremony will be held the at O2 Academy in Brixton and will see Ono, who turns 83 the day after the event, thanked for the massive impact she’s had on pop culture in the last 50 years, from pioneering contemporary art to inspiring John Lennon, whom she married in 1969. Here are eleven times Yoko Ono helped to shape the face of popular culture forever. 

Grapefruit

Ono’s 1964 art-book Grapefruit is full of instructions and aphorisms such as: “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is a reality.” The messages within the book seem simple, but her real talent lies in the clarity required to achieve that simplicity. When you consider the 140-character nature of Twitter (which Ono’s pretty excellent at), you can see how ahead of her time she was. 

‘Bed-In’

In 1969, Ono and Lennon staged two identical protes details

It's not just budding pop stars Adele has inspired with incredible third album 25, even music legends are following her lead. I can reveal that Paul McCartney is working on new material with producer Greg Kurstin, the mastermind behind her now-iconic single Hello. The Beatles star has songs ready for a new album and, having been so impressed by Adele’s comeback, called on Greg to help him hone them.

A music insider revealed: “Paul loved what Greg did with Adele and knows he can add something special to his record. “He is really embracing the pop direction of his last album and wants to continue in that vein with his new stuff.

“It’s a huge coup as Greg is without doubt the most sought-after producer at the moment. “He was going to produce Paul’s full album but is going to work on a couple of tracks first and they will take it from there.” Last year Adele admitted that without Greg, record-breaking album 25 may never have seen the light of day.

Discussing the moment they came up with Hello during a session in 2013, she said: “This song was a massive breakthrough for me with my writing because it had been pretty slow up to this point.

Source: Th details

THE Beatles may never have made it to Clacton but that doesn’t mean they didn’t leave their mark on the resort. Thirty years after A Hard’s Day’s Night was screened at the now long-lost Odeon, in West Avenue, fan and musician Karl Johnson found himself in a time-warp dating back to the Fab Four’s heyday.

“It was a little disused hotel bedroom at the top of either the Criterion on Pier restaurant, facing the sea, and it was covered from top to bottom in Beatles wallpaper,” said Karl. “There had been a rumour that the Beatles were almost booked to appear at the Princes Theatre in 1964 and this wallpaper had been there since then. “Most of it was still intact, stuck on to the crumbling walls of this Victorian room. “I went there with my dad and we stripped it all off because they were refurbishing it. “It seemed to still be in good condition but once it was removed from the walls the brittle paper just crumbled apart. “We had a hell of a job getting it off the wall. Some of it wouldn’t come off and some of it was damp.”

Dad Derek was an antiques dealer. They saved what they could and mounted it onto cards before sending it off for a details

Get ready for the British Invasion at Henry Ford Museum. Beginning April 30, 2016, The Magical History Tour: A Beatles Memorabilia Exhibition will take visitors on an unprecedented journey of the Fab Four’s ground-breaking career that’s not to be missed. The Magical History Tour offers guests the opportunity to retrace the steps of the Beatles and the way in which they changed the music industry and influenced American pop culture with the best private collection ever assembled, that highlights their formatives years in Liverpool and Hamburg, the screaming fans across the world and goes into the studio for the creation of some of the most innovative music in history.

Fans and visitors will experience the exhibition in a fast-forward journey from birth to fame to breakup and beyond. The robust multi-sensory galleries include:

Beginnings, Influence and Life in Liverpool: Guests will be immersed in the atmosphere of late 50s/early 60s Liverpool. Part of the very stage that supported some of the band’s early shows is on display, as well as instruments, personal letters and photographs, and various documents detailing the growing fame of the Fab Four. These artifacts are incredibly rare, as they com details

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