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"He had a habit of just giving his art away to people," Yoko Ono softly explained, in a phone interview with The Huffington Post. "He was pretty generous about that."

Yes, that humble "he" refers to John Lennon, the legendary singer, songwriter, musician and artist who inspired the world to imagine peace. As such, it's not a huge shock that he enjoyed giving away his drawings. "We had a big lawyers meeting and the whole time they were talking he was just scribbling something," Ono said. "The lawyers would come to John and say, 'What are you doing?' And he was making this beautiful, beautiful artwork. And the lawyer said, 'Well, can I have it?' And he said, 'Sure, sure.' That's just how John was."

Due to Lennon's aforementioned altruism, many of his works have wound their way into lucky hands throughout the world. Still, a precious supply resides with his artistic collaborator and great love, Yoko Ono. The 82-year-old multidisciplinary artist is presenting her treasure trove of sketches for the world to see, providing art lovers and Beatles-maniacs alike details

Abbey Road Studios is among the most famous recording studios in music history, and while music fans are no doubt familiar with the albums that came out of Abbey Road – the Beatles catalog, Dark Side of the Moon, The Bends, among many others – not many have actually seen the inside of the storied London studio itself. That is, until now.

For Inside Abbey Road, Google has teamed with the studio to present an in-depth, multimedia guided tour through the famed studios by combining the search engine's Google Maps technology with YouTube videos, interactive exhibits and more.

"Abbey Road Studios has been a hive of creativity and source of world-class recordings for more than 80 years," Giles Martin, producer and the son of longtime Beatles collaborator George Martin, said in a statement. "The artists using the studios have sold countless millions of records and have helped create popular culture as we know it today. It's an inspirational place and an honour for me to work there today. This collaboration with Google gives the outside world a great insight into th details

Ringo Starr snubs autobiography offers - Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Ringo Starr refuses to write an autobiography because publishers are only interested in his career with The Beatles.

The 74-year-old drummer has been approached to tell his story in a book on numerous occasions but has always refused because he doesn't want to pen a tome that primarily focuses on his time with The Fab Four and discounts his life and work after the band split in 1970.

Instead, Ringo prefers to tell tales of his life and share memories with his fans in his songs, starting with 2008 LP 'Liverpool 8'.

In an interview with Billboard magazine, Ringo said: "I've been invited to write it (an autobiography) by several publishing houses but I don't feel they're interested in my autobiography - they're only interested in the eight years I was in The Beatles. So for some reason it came to me, starting with 'Liverpool 8', I'm going to write snippets of my life on each album. One track on each is dedicated to memories of the past, incidents of the past. I do it instead of an autobiography."

Ringo has just released a new LP, 'Postcards From Paradi details

Sir Paul McCartney has issued an impassioned appeal for an end to the senseless slaughter of baby harp seals taking place off Canada's east coast. The Canadian government has authorized the killing of up to 468,000 harp, hooded and grey seals. The seals-almost all just a few weeks of age-are shot, clubbed and skinned for their fur despite dwindling global demand for seal products. Humane Society International is the only organization on the scene to bear witness to the 2015 commercial seal hunt.

McCartney said: "Canada's brutal commercial seal hunt has begun, and once again thousands of baby seals will be shot and bludgeoned to make fur products that nobody wants or needs. The European Union's trade ban on commercial seal hunt products has already helped save more than one million baby seals from a horrible fate. But we need to ensure the EU keeps this strong ban intact. That's why my friends at Humane Society International are once again setting out for the ice flows for the grim task of catching this horror on film. Their videos of the bloody seal slaughter provide the only vital details

It’s difficult to find an area of music that the Beatles didn’t influence, but their contribution to the progression of heavy metal is often overlooked. Perhaps best remembered for their psychedelic art-rock and flawless pop singles, the Fab Four could certainly let their hair down and fire off some headbangers, inspiring metal architects like Ozzy Osbourne and Gene Simmons. Plus their pioneering work with distortion, feedback, unorthodox lyrical topics, and death metal roars helped provide the building blocks of the genre.

So without further ado, in chronological order, here are nine Beatles songs that clearly helped pave the road to heavy metal.

1. “Twist And Shout,” from Please Please Me (1963)

A rock vocal to end all rock vocals, John’s performance on “Twist And Shout” is made all the more remarkable when you realize he was suffering from a terrible cold. On top of that, The Beatles were booked to record their first album in a single day, so by the time Lennon got this (his final track), he larynx was pretty details

Were you upset by the breakup of the Beatles back in the day? So was Ringo Starr.

The Fab Four drummer told the Times of London that he often spent the 1970s and '80s in a boozy haze.

“I was drunk,” he said. "Some of those years are absolutely gone.”

Starr, 74, explained to the paper that the group's split affected him for a long time. “I was mad,” he said. “For 20 years. I had breaks in between of not being.”

This isn't the first time the famous mop-topped performer has opened up about his alcoholism in the wake of the breakup. After entering rehab with wife Barbara Bach in 1988, he later told People magazine that the band's dissolution left him "absolutely lost." Drinking helped keep him that way.

"It got progressively worse, and the blackouts got worse, and I didn't know where I'd been, what I'd done," he told the magazine. "I knew I had the problem for years. But it plays tricks with your head. Very cunning and baffling is alcohol."

By: Ron Dicker

Source: the Huffington Po details

1965: Music's greatest year ever? - Sunday, April 12, 2015

Here in the media-saturated 2010s, we get to relive the events of the momentous 1960s in an inexorable year-by-year march.

Last year, the Beatles re-invaded America. Next year, 50th-anniversary journalism will see to it that the miniskirt and Star Trek are born again. In 2017, we'll be tripping on a Summer of Love rehash.

This year, there's a lot on our plate - 1965 was a turning point in American history. As depicted in Ava DuVernay's Selma, it was the year the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s civil rights march to Montgomery, Ala., spurred Lyndon Johnson's signing of the Voting Rights Act into law.
In Nixonland, historian Rick Perlstein showed how it was also the year that reaction to the Watts riots in Los Angeles helped create the culture-war divide that still defines American political discourse.

And as socio-political tumult grew, pop music stretched itself in response. With rock and roll then a decade old - the Elvis Presley youthquake detonated in 1955 - the music was growing more sophisticated in its rebelliousness.

Was it th details

In a ceremony last year at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the Beatles’ original manager, Brian Epstein, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The honor was well deserved. Epstein’s early oversight of what many consider to be the most popular musical act of the 20th century led some to call him the fifth Beatle. Some of the strategies he used to propel the Beatles to prominence (while also probably costing them a fortune in lost potential revenue) would be ill suited to today’s world of digital streaming, music piracy and YouTube, which makes Epstein a case study in how much music management has changed since the early 1960s.

Epstein was born in Liverpool in 1934 to Harry and Queen details

In a nondescript building tucked away on a quiet street in west London, Stella McCartney and her team are comparing the properties of a real leather shoe with the various non-leather swatches being considered for her brand’s winter 2015 shoe collection.

Women of differing ages, ethnicities and body types come in and out of the room with a constant flow of new ideas while McCartney acts as a kind of real-time editor, deciding what colours, materials and shapes feel right for the upcoming season.

An assistant is frantically taking notes to capture her feedback while snapping digital photos of the things that catch her eye.

McCartney does not use any animal products — no leather, no fur, no skins, no feathers.

“We always have this conversation about our non-leathers. We are, of course, the most ethical and loving company in the fashion industry,” she says half-joking, almost mocking herself, “but at this stage I always have to apologise to my designers and creative team for the limitations [this creates].”

Her busi details

When ‘Ravi Shankar: A Life In Music’, is unveiled at the Grammy Museum here, on April 29, it would mark the first exhibition in the United States to celebrate India’s most esteemed musician, who died on December 11, 2012, at La Jolla in San Diego, California.The date, April 29, would also be the renowned sitar player and Beatles’ inspiration Ravi Shankar’s 95th birthday.Through a collection of sitars, artifacts and rare photographs from the Shankar family, the exhibit will provide visitors with a one-of-a-kind glimpse into the Grammy-winning world music icon’s early life, the roots of his musicality and his vast impact on Western music, according to a press release.“Ravi Shankar is as synonymous to world music as Elvis Presley is to rock and roll,” said Bob Santelli, Executive Director of the Grammy Museum, in a statetement. “Through his decades of world concert performances and the relationships he built with Western artists such as Yehudi Menuhin, Philip Glass, John Coltrane, and The Beatles, Shankar was instrumental in introdu details

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