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HARD DAY'S KNIGHT

Described as the 'most overdue knighthood of all time' by musical writer Sir Tim Rice, the honour was presented by the Duke of Cambridge

20th March 2018, 12:43 pm

THE Beatles' Ringo Starr finally received a knighthood at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace today.

Described as the "most overdue knighthood of all time" by musical writer Sir Tim Rice, the honour was presented by the Duke of Cambridge. Starr, 77, previously said: "It's great! It's an honour and a pleasure to be considered and acknowledged for my music and my charity work, both of which I love. Peace and love. Ringo."

Sir Paul McCartney was knighted in 1997 but Ringo was said to have given up all hope before a letter arrived from the Palace last year. A close family friend of Ringo said at the time: “It came as a bolt from the blue.

Source: By John Shammas/thesun.co.uk

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Ron Campbel was about 6 when he saw his first cartoon in a movie theater. He went home and started drawing.

And that was the beginning of the 78-year-old's art career.

Campbell kept drawing until his own pictures came alive on both television and in the movies. Some of those drawings even escalated into legendary status when The Beatles boarded their "Yellow Submarine."

That's some of his animation in The Beatles' 1968 feature film "Yellow Submarine." Those psychedelic images will be on exhibit this week in Lafayette and New Orleans.

Campbell is showing and selling his work at Gallery 912 in Lafayette on Tuesday and Wednesday, then at the Boyd Satellite Gallery in New Orleans from Friday through Sunday.

Even if you've never watched "Yellow Submarine," you've probably still seen Campbell's work in such classics as "Scooby Doo," "The Jetsons," "The Flintstones," "Yogi Bear," "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" and "The Smurfs."

Source: ROBIN MILLER | romiller@theadvocate.com

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Orange Amplification is helping to raise funds for the Salvation Army’s Strawberry Field campaign. This charitable cause aims to reopen the Strawberry Field site, immortalised in the Beatles song ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’.

As a child John Lennon famously used to jump over the wall in the Strawberry Field grounds, where he would play and listen to The Salvation Army band. Lennon grew up just a stone’s throw away from the site which has lain unused for 12 years.

The Salvation Army has owned Strawberry Field since the 1930’s and want to build a hub that offers training, skills and valuable work placements providing real employment prospects to young people with learning disabilities and help them to achieve their full potential. They also hope to open the world famous gates of Strawberry Field to the public for the first time in summer 2019. The tranquil gardens will promote the theme of peace and love and feature a new exhibition dedicated to the history of Strawberry Field, the song and Lennon’s early life.

Source: Andrew Braith/musictalkers.com

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Sandie Shaw believes John Lennon would still be alive if he had married her instead of Yoko Ono.

The 71-year-old retired singer had a huge crush on the late Beatles legend - who was murdered on December 8, 1980 - from a young age.

The two musicians would regularly cross paths during the swinging 60s in Britain but she was never able to progress their friendship to a romance, something she regrets.

Sandie - who has two children with Virgin Group co-founder Nik Powell and daughter Gracie Banks with fashion designer Jeff Banks - told the Daily Mirror newspaper: "I loved John and thought he should have married me. He'd be alive today if I had, I would have protected him and taken a bullet for him!"

The 'Puppet on a String' hitmaker - who is now married to third husband Tony Bedford - first met the 'I Am The Walrus' singer at a Beatles concert at The Royal Albert Hall by pretending to be his cousin.

Sandie - who received an MBE this year - recalled: "The Beatles were performing at the Royal Albert Hall so I rang up, saying 'I'm Sandra, John's cousin. I haven't seen him in ages, so I will pop in'.

Source: femalefirst.co.uk

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A true blend of the Beatles and opera

Emotionworks Cut Opera presents La Beatles Boheme, a series of opera fusion on the Melbourne CBD Flagstaff Carpark rooftop with a bar. The performances run over two weekends, from Saturday April 21 until Sunday April 29. Cover for extreme weather is supplied.

The rooftop location is a reference to the final rooftop performance of the Beatles. As with most of Cut Opera performances, opera and rock go side by side, telling the story of the four bohemians imagined as the Beatles. In the 90-minute performance takes Puccini’s La Boheme mixed with the best of the Beatles discography.

The show is to be directed by Julie Edwardson, an award-winning director with Opera Australia and the cast will feature both operatic and contemporary singers.

La Beatles Boheme is opens on the Flagstaff Carpark rooftop on Saturday April 21, tickets via Try Booking.

Source: By Holly Denison/beat.com.au

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“I had a lot of emotional abuse with my mother; she was schizophrenic,” said Kaya John as she discussed her book, “When Life Sends You Lemons, Make Lennonaid: What John Lennon’s Life Did For Mine” (Balboa Press, 192 pp., $14.99), a story of how The Beatles and, in particular, John Lennon saved her from a path of self-destruction due to, among other things, abusive parents.

“She went into a very dark period where her insane anger just overtook her, and I was the target for it,” continued John. “And on my father’s end, there was very violent sexual abuse and, of course, that’s coming to the forefront in our culture and our world right now in a lot of different areas. It’s interesting because it took me a lot of years to write this book, and the timing of it seems to be rather amazing considering how that’s surfacing.

“A lot of people like The Beatles (and) there’s been a lot of books written about The Beatles but I’ve never read a really serious, personal book, written by a Beatles fan (about) how they affected their life. How they transformed their life, what they learned from The Beatles. And in my case, they helped me surv details

Blast from the past - Sunday, March 18, 2018

In February 1968, members of the legendary rock band, The Beatles, arrived in Rishikesh for a "momentous" sojourn. A teenage rebel — a diehard Beatles fan himself — watched them with keen interest. Five decades later, he has compiled an account of their stay here, and maintains that the three-year period that marked their affair with India was particularly significant in the life of the band.
"This is when The Beatles reinvented themselves from being the world's most famous pop stars into pioneering musical artists, creating new parameters of contemporary music," says Ajoy Bose, who has written an exhaustive account of their journey in Across The Universe: The Beatles in India.

Musical note
Bose, a well-known journalist, finds it interesting that their growing relationship with India, "led by George Harrison, who was particularly into Indian music, culture and religion, went side by side with their experiments with narcotics and psychedelic drugs".

Source: The Tribune

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On March 24, a unique archive of photographs of the Beatles will go on sale and is expected to fetch at least $350,000 at auction. Photographer Mike Mitchell was just 18 when he shot the Beatles' first US concert in 1964, and the 413 negatives with full copyright are available to purchase. Mike's story of how the photographs came about is compelling.

"I was in a point in my life where I was learning that photography could take me anywhere," explains Mike, more than 50 years later. Because of the equipment that he had available, Mike shot in black and white without flash and used only available light.
Coming two days after The Beatles legendary appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Mitchell also attended the press conference before the gig at the Washington Coliseum, before photographing them again a month later at the Baltimore Civic Center. With virtually no restrictions, Mitchell shot with the intention of creating portraits rather than merely documenting the events and was able to move freely about the stage, producing an intimate encounter with a group that was bringing something completely different to popular culture.

Source: Andy Day /fstoppers.com

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1. The Beatles first fan was Irish. The Beatles Tune-In author Mark Lewisohn tracked down Pat Moran who was originally from a strict Irish Catholic home in Liverpool. In a letter written to Pat from 1960 Paul McCartney described her as the band's "number one fan." As Lewisohn suggests something in The Beatles story touched Pat deeply, her father wasn't such a fan sending his daughter to confession after committing the "sin" of chattering about The Beatles non-stop. She sent food parcels, gave them money and even arranged a holiday for the struggling musicians before losing touch when joining the Royal Air Force.

2. The notoriously private George Harrison came from an Irish Catholic family on his mother's side. Unusually for the time his grandparents never married. The Beatles Tune-In author suggests the secretive aspect to his family and their suspicion of "nosy neighbours" had a lasting effect on Harrison's attitude.

3. John Lennon's mother Julia survived an IRA bomb on 3rd May 1939. Julia Lennon worked as an usherette in the Trocadero cinema where one of two tear-gas bombs went off that night. There was no loss of life but fifteen patrons were treated in hospital.

Source: Richard Purden/irishpost.co.uk details

In February 1968, members of the legendary rock band, The Beatles, arrived in Rishikesh for a "momentous" sojourn. A teenage rebel -- a diehard Beatles fan himself -- watched them with keen interest. Five decades later, he has compiled an account of their stay here, and maintains that the three-year period that marked their affair with India was particularly significant in the life of the band.

"This is when The Beatles reinvented themselves from being the world's most famous pop stars into pioneering musical artists, creating new parameters of contemporary music," says Ajoy Bose, who has written an exhaustive account of their journey in "Across The Universe: The Beatles in India".

Bose, a well-known journalist, finds it interesting that their growing relationship with India, "led by George Harrison, who was particularly into Indian music, culture and religion, went side by side with their experiments with narcotics and psychedelic drugs".

Source: IANS/business-standard.com

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