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Unseen footage of the Beatles on the set of their 1965 movie Help! will soon go on sale after the 8mm film was unearthed after 50 years in storage.

Actor Leo McKern, who played the evil swami Clang in the Beatles' second feature-length film, shot the 8mm film while on the set of Help! The Beatles appear in 10 minutes of the footage, which has an asking price of approximately $45,000.

"This is footage taken in 1965 of people who at the time were the most famous people on earth at the pinnacle of their collective career," books dealer Neil Pearson, who is selling the footage, told Reuters.

McKern reportedly filmed the Beatles during the Help! "snow scenes" in the Austrian Alps, with the group tobogganing and messing around with their stunt doubles on set.

There is also footage of candid behind-the-scenes moments between band members, including Paul McCartney smoking a cigarette and taking photographs.

The 8mm reel contains footage of McKern playing with his then-10-year-old daughter Abigail on the Help! set, as well as the Beatles' then-wives and girlfriends on set, the Guardian reports. Leo McKern died in 2002. The "snow scenes" footage remained in the family's garage until Pearson unearth details

Last year, Stella McCartney launched her first millennial fragrance POP, a fresh and feminine scent that champions the notes of tuberose and sandalwood.

It was deemed more than just a fragrance, as the brand wanted to push a message across to the younger generation: ‘It is about a mindset rather than an individual woman,' they declared. 'Bold. Authentic. Irreverent.’

The campaign was equally impactful with millennial stars including Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon, the musician Grimes, animal activist Kenya Kiniski Jones, and actress and campaigner Amandla Stenberg taking centre stage. In an era where designer perfumes are declining in favour of niche fragrance houses, it was a clever move for McCartney to delve into a younger market, which amounts to over 13.8 million potential customers.

It was clearly a success though as today, McCartney is unveiling a sequel scent, POP Bluebell, from £44. The fragrance promises to be delicate yet distinctive with the British bluebell note bringing a depth and personality to the collection.

“As human beings, we’re always changing, and POP is evolving with its wearers," the British designer explained. "I really love these gir details

Angry John Lennon letter up for auction - Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Paul and Linda McCartney weren’t the only ones John Lennon had harsh words for in letter form.

An angry letter that Lennon wrote concerning the distribution of his and Yoko Ono’s experimental album “Unfinished Music No. 1: Two Virgins” is being auctioned off by Boston-based RR Auction.

In the handwritten piece of correspondence, addressed to Martin George of Rock Ink & Roll Ink, the rock icon expresses frustration with difficulty in getting the 1968 record out to the masses.

“Yoko and I got Two Virgins out in spite of being past owners of Apple [the Beatles’ record label]. We made it in May and they f–ked us about till November! Then E.M.I. (who have the real control) wrote warning letters to all their puppets around the world telling them not handle it in any way,” the letter reads.

The album was the first music released by Lennon following the breakup of the Beatles. E.M.I., Apple’s parent company, refused to distribute it due to the fully nude photo of John and Yoko that adorned its front and back.

 

By: Bryan Hood

Source: Page Six

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A collection of sixties memorabilia is being sold off by Welsh singer Mary Hopkin - one of the first artists to be signed to The Beatles’ Apple label.

The Pontardawe -born star, who shot to fame with 1968 UK number one single Those Were The Days, is auctioning off a collection of clothes she wore at the height of her fame, including designer stage dresses when she sang with the stars - and a rare Beatles poster from the cusp of the Fab Four’s superstardom.

The poster is advertising the Beatles’ August 1963 gig at The Pier Pavilion in Llandudno, North Wales, and is expected to auction for £400 to £800.

The same month the band went straight to number one with their second hit, “She Loves You”, marking the eruption of Beatlemania across the world.

The small concert in the north Welsh seaside town was priced at 4/6d, 6/6d and 8/6d, and was part of the Beatles’ tour of smaller venues around the UK. Auctioneer Ben Rogers Jones said: “It was right that the poster should be delivered to our auction rooms in Colwyn Bay, only three miles from the venue where The Beatles played that night.

Source: Wales Online

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The timing could not be better for the WAVE 3 News Abbey Road on the River to pay homage to the iconic and acclaimed album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The album was released by The Beatles 50 years ago in 1967, and is set for the much anticipated re-release on May 26, which coincides with the five-day festival, coming up May 25-29, 2017.

Sgt. Pepper, regarded as one of the first concept albums, is known for being one of the most influential and innovative albums of all time. It won four Grammy’s, and included hits like “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds,” “With a Little Help From My Friends,” and “A Day in the Life.”

The new, remixed special anniversary edition of the Sgt. Pepper album includes previously unreleased takes from their recording sessions.

More than 15 events will celebrate the groundbreaking album throughout the weekend, including 9 concerts, a presentation by internationally recognized Beatles expert Scott Freiman, and a “Pepper at 50” panel discussion with author Bruce Spizer, Beatle best friend and long-time aide Tony Bramwell, and “Beatle Brunch” Radio Host Joe Johnson.

On Saturday, May 27 at 11:45 p. details

They might've come from Liverpool, but The Beatles certainly left their mark all over London. Here are some of our favourite London locations connected to the band: take a trip around the sights, and indulge in your very own Magical Mystery Tour of the capital.


1. Dodge the cars at Abbey Road Studios and crossing

Start your day at what's probably the most famous London Beatles landmark: Abbey Road.

The Fab Four didn't just record their Abbey Road album here; this was the location the band recorded nearly all their albums and singles from 1962 to 1970 at this famous address.
Take care if you stop for photos on that iconic pelican crossing: cars don't like stopping for the inevitable hoards of tourists all doing exactly the same thing...

2. Sample the delights at the Beatles Coffee Shop

If you've successfully swerved the traffic in the name of Instagram perfection, celebrate with a cup of coffee from The Beatles Coffee Shop at St John's Wood station.

By: Zoe Craig

Source: Londonist

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A new letter reveals the reason why the BBC banned The Beatles' psychedelic masterpiece 'A Day In The Life'.
The Fab Four will issue an expanded version of 'Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band' shortly, casting new light on one of the most vital documents of the psychedelic era.
Much mythology has crowded around the album, so it's always nice to uncover a fresh artefact, a new shard of light on such a vaunted release.
The Beatles official Facebook page shared a remarkable letter from the BBC, detailing its reasons for banning 'A Day In The Life'.
It explains: "We cannot avoid coming to the conclusion that the words "I'd love to turn you on", followed by that mounting montage of sound, could have a rather sinister meaning".
The letter continues: "The recording may have been made in innocence and good faith, but we must take account of the interpretation many young people would inevitably put upon it. "Turned on" is a phrase which can be used in many different circumstances, but it is currently much in-vogue in the jargon of drug addicts".

By: Robin Murray

Source: Clash Music

Read More &g details

If the Kennedy Center Honors is the venue’s biggest end-of-the-year party, the annual Spring Gala gives it a run for its money for live music.

Last year, a star-studded lineup of musicians — Leslie Odom Jr., Babyface, Valerie Simpson, Mary Wilson and BJ The Chicago Kid — turned out to salute the iconic music of the late Marvin Gaye.

On Monday night, this year’s ceremony delivered “Come Together: A Celebration of John Lennon,” saluting the genius behind so many Beatles hits, as well as a solo career that was tragically cut short.

“You’re wondering if we’re going to get to your favorite John Lennon song: ‘Norwegian Wood,’ ‘Strawberry Fields Forever,’ ‘Power to the People,’ ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,’ ‘Dear Prudence’? Sorry, we’re not doing any of those. Get over it,” emcee David Duchovny joked. “We would’ve loved to have played them all, but if you wanted to spend that much time sitting in a seat at the Kennedy Center, you’d be over in the Opera House watching ‘Madame Butterfly.’ … Your [butt] thanks us!”

The event kicked off w details

Turner prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller is to stage a haunting tribute to the Beatles’ manager, Brian Epstein, in the run-up to events in Liverpool marking 50 years since the release of the band’s groundbreaking album, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

The artist, who created the centenary commemoration of the lost soldiers of the Battle of the Somme last year and a controversial re-enactment of the Battle of Orgreave, has designed a series of posters that will go up around the city later this month. They will bear powerful slogans about Epstein’s devotion to the Beatles, some associating his sacrifices with those of a religious martyr.

“Rock music is a belief system, in a way, and Brian Epstein dedicated everything to the Beatles and to their success. His main concern was their well-being,” said Deller. “In terms of its characters and stories, the way we feel about rock’n’roll music since the Beatles is like religion, or at least an alternative belief system.”

When the city’s mayor, Joe Anderson, announced a carnival of arts that will begin on 25 May, the Merseyside statue of the band members – John Lennon, George Harrison, Pa details

It was 36 years ago today (May 7th, 1981) that George Harrison released his tribute to John Lennon, called "All Those Years Ago." The song is notable for being the first record since the Beatles' 1970 breakup to feature all three surviving group members, George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr.

According to several sources, the song was originally taped the year before for inclusion on Ringo's 1981 Stop And Smell The Roses album. Harrison had written the song with different lyrics for him to sing, with the song's basic track featuring himself on guitar and Ringo on drums. The song was left off the album, and after Lennon's murder in 1980, Harrison revamped the song into a tribute to his late bandmate.

In early 1981, Harrison, Paul and Linda McCartney, and Wings co-founder Denny Laine recorded the song's distinctive backing vocals at Harrison's home studio Friar Park. The vocal sessions were supervised by legendary Beatles producer George Martin and engineer Geoff Emerick, who at the time were recording with McCartney for hisTug Of War album.

Denny Laine who had known the Beatles intimately since touring with them in the mid-'60s while still in the Moody Blues, says that there was no difference b details

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