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Beatles 50th Blog

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 8, 1970

Back in 1967.....

The band member known as The Quiet Beatle had his loud-and-clear say about hippies and the Haight-Ashbury in the Summer of Love.

Harrison is quoted saying he thought the Haight “would be something like King’s Road (in London), only more. Somehow I expected them to all own their own little shops. I expected them all to be nice and clean and friendly and happy.”

Instead, after touring the hippie ‘hood and encountering  a “wild band of jeering hippies” during an impromptu song sesh on nearby Hippie Hill in Golden Gate Park, Harrison declared hippies to be “hideous, spotty little teenagers.”

Harrison said, “I went there expecting it to be a brilliant place, with groovy gypsy people making works of art and paintings and carvings in little workshops. But it was full of horrible spotty drop-out kids on drugs, and it turned me right off the whole scene.”

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 7, 1970

Back in 1968

In an attempt to defuse the controversy surrounding John Lennon's comments that The Beatles were "more popular than Jesus", the group's manager Brian Epstein held a special press conference.

Despite suffering from glandular fever, in the morning he had cut short his holiday in Portmeirion, north Wales, and flown from England to the US.

Epstein was fearful that The Beatles' imminent US tour might have to be cancelled, as by this point public outcry had grown to the extent that 30 US radio stations had banned The Beatles' records.

The press conference was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Manhattan, New York. Epstein began by reading a statement approved by Lennon, before taking questions from the press.

The quote which John Lennon made to a London columnist nearly three months ago has been quoted and misrepresented entirely out of context of the article, which was in fact highly complimentary to Lennon as a person and was understood by him to be exclusive to the Evening Standard. It was not anticipated that it would be displayed out of context and in such a manner as it was in an American teenage magazine.

Lennon didn't mean to boast about the Beatles' fame. He meant to point out that the Beatles' effect appeared to be a more immediate one upon, certainly, the younger generation. John is deeply concerned and regrets that people with certain religious beliefs should have been offended.

Q: We're wondering whether you're going to change the itinerary of The Beatles to avoid areas where the radio stations are now burning their records and their pictures?

This is highly unlikely. I've spoken to many of the promoters this morning. When I leave here, I have a meeting with several of the promoters who are anxious that the concerts should not be cancelled, at all. Actually, if any of the promoters were so concerned and wish that the concerts be cancelled, I wouldn't, in fact, stand in their way.

 

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 6, 1970

Back on this day in 1963

Springfield Ballroom, Janvrin Rd., St. Saviour, Jersey, Channel Islands

These nights were played in Jersey, promoted by John Smith. The Beatle's five nights in the Channel Islands earned them £1,000.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 5, 1970

Back in 1967 on this date...

George Harrison attended a recording session by the Indian musician Alla Rakha in Los Angeles.

Afterwards Harrison, his wife Pattie plus Neil Aspinall and Alexis "Magic Alex" Mardas, went for a meal in the city's Olvera Street, accompanied by Derek Taylor and his family.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 4, 1970

Back in 1967 on this day.....

George Harrison, his wife Pattie, Neil Aspinall and Alexis "Magic Alex" Mardas went to see Ravi Shankar perform at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles.

 

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 3, 1970

Back on this date in 1968....

The Beatles recording "Hey Jude"

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 2, 1970

On this day in 1963.....

Playhouse Theatre, Manchester

Two more sessions for Pop Go The Beatles - editions 11 and 12 - broadcast in the BBC radio Light Programme on Tuesdays, August 27th and September 3rd between 5:00 and 5:29 pm. (The Beatles guests were Cyril Davie's Rhythm & Blues All-Stars featuring Long John Baldry, and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes.)

The recordings were made at the Playhouse Theatre in Manchester (without an audience, like all the shows in the series). They arrived at 12:00 noon for a rehearsal and then taped Program 11 between 1:30 and 4:00 and Program 12 from 4:00 to 6:00 pm.

In the eleventh show the Beatles performed "Twist and Shout". "Ohh! My Soul", "Don't Ever Change", "She Loves You", "Anna (Go to him)" and "A Shot of Rhythm and Blues".

For Program 12, the group taped "Lucille", "From Me To You", "I'll Get You", "Money (That's What I Want)", "Baby It's You", "There's a Place", "Honey Don't (John singing lead vocal) and "Roll Over Beethoven". "Lucille" and "Baby It's You" were omitted from the broadcast, however.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: August 1, 1970

On this very day.....
1970--John Lennon’s first wife, Cynthia, re-marries; her new husband is Roberto Bassanini.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: July 31, 1970

Back on this day in 1966

The Beatles started a five week run at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Yesterday...And Today', the group's 8th No.1 album.

The Beatles - A Day in The Life: July 30, 1970

Back on this day in 1965....

Saville Theatre, Shaftesbury Ave. London

Set to perform live on British television on August 1, their first such appearance in more than a year, the Beatles spent part of this day in private rehearsal on stage at the Saville Theatre, a central London venue leased by brian Epstein's NEMS Enterprises from April 1, 1965 until after his death.

While there, the group also gave two inteviews for BBC radio, principally discussing HELP!, premiered in London just the night before, July 29th. The first interview was with Dibbs Mather, a long and witty conversation which was, most unusually, distributed by the BBC's Transcription Service to the British Council which promoted British culture in foreign countries. Along with disc material, it was packaged simply titled The Beatles, sent to the British Council in New York and dispatched from there to specified US radio stations for local broacast.

The second interview was with British entertainer/comic actor Lance Percival, two minutes of which was broadcast the next day, between 12:00 noon and 12:29 pm, in his Light Programme records show Lance A Gogo.

 

Source: The Complete Beatles Chronicle, Mark Lewisohn